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From: Johnathan (69.47.243.40)
Subject:         Re: Soy's aluminum content and Alzheimer's
Date: May 27, 2011 at 6:51 pm PST

In Reply to: Re: Soy's aluminum content and Alzheimer's posted by Jeff Novick, MS, RD, LD, LN on April 8, 2009 at 7:32 am:

I don't know what Jeff's agenda, but soy is most definitely a health food. Soy beans are nutritious and healthful and may have some unique benefits. It's a legume, jusy like peanuts or almonds.As to all the things that are bad about consuming, say, cow's milk, whole books could be written. Every beginning nursing student quickly learns that, for example, giving cow's milk to babies is implicated in their getting type 1 diabetes later. It's recently been implicated in Alzheimer's.

I don't know why this sudden wave of anti-soy campaigns are comming from pn vegsource.com too. Mercola and Weston A Price with their financial ties to the meat and dairy industries have suckered a lot of people in believing their gibber jabber. I know these scare-mongering, misinformation, and propaganda surrounding having no soy consumption really needs to stop. And listening to charlatan like this one looks bad.

Generations of Asians, not just the Japanese, have regularly consumed soy without fertility disorders, and Asian countries have produced very healthy, highly functioning children for centuries. The Japanese, who are the healthiest ethnic group world-wide, eat a lot of soy in one day. To say they limit their soy intake is silly and wrong fout out. But they live the longest.

Generations of Asians, not just the Japanese, have regularly consumed soy without fertility disorders, and Asian countries have produced very healthy, highly functioning children for centuries.

There is no conclusive or convincing evidence that soy consumption is linked to endocrine disruption, breast cancer, hormone imbalances, troubles with menopausal women, tissue proliferation, negatively Affecting the thyroid, low sperm count in men, etc. Phytoestrogens don't always mimic estrogens. In some tissues they actually block the action of estrogen.In women phytoestrogens seem to be able to help both with women who have too much or too little estrogen by acting as precursor in the latter situation and by competing for binding sites in the former.


Most studies that cites soy implicated as having adverse effects were conducted on animals like mice or rabbits. most of them are based on small-scale, preliminary, cross-sectional, uncontrolled studies, or short-term studies, not randomized controlled studies. Humans metabolize soy a lot differently than do animals. That is why horses canot be fed soy, or else they'd die. Studies like these mean nothing overall in relation to human health because I said that humans metabolize soy very differently. They do not tell the whole story and are based on big, noticeable limitations. These study also did not determine directly what other foods, medications, supplements, existing medical conditions, activities or environmental factors may have directly affected the the test subjects.


Clinical studies show no effects of soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men: results from meta analysis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19524224

Meta-analysis of the effects of soy protein containing isoflavones on the pid profile. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15699227

Soy consumption and prostate cancer risk in men: a revisit of a meta-analysis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19211820

Soy intake and risk of endocrine-related gynaecological cancer: a meta-analysis. BJOG. 2009 Dec;116(13):1697-705. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19775307

Soy isoflavone intake increases bone mineral density in the spine of menopausal women: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18063230


Soy intake may be associated with a small reduction in breast cancer risk.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16595782

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