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From: TSS ()
Subject: MORE TEXAS Mad cows undetected thus far ? (Texas madcow for petfood or human food?)
Date: July 10, 2005 at 8:39 am PST

Mad cow undetected thus far

Posted on Sun, Jul. 10, 2005


By Barry Shlachter

Star-Telegram Staff Writer


No sign of mad cow disease was detected in 29 cattle from the Texas herd that produced the nation's second case of the fatal brain-wasting disease, the Agriculture Department said Saturday.

Thirty-eight other Texas cattle from the same herd have been killed for testing, and an unknown number of additional livestock are being traced, spokesman Jim Rogers said.

Brain tissue samples from the 38 were sent Friday to the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, for the same Bio-Rad rapid test to determine signs of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE, Rogers said. Results are pending.

Non-negative results from the rapid test are considered inconclusive because the test frequently yields false positives.

But an inconclusive result will prompt a pair of confirmatory tests -- the Western blot, and immunohistochemistry, or IHC -- both considered more reliable. In the case of an inconclusive result, samples would also be sent to the Veterinary Laboratories Agency in Weybridge, England, for simultaneous confirmatory testing.

Last month, the government added the Western blot as a mandatory test after a routine IHC test on the infected Texas cow at Ames was negative.

The case was confirmed only because researchers used the animal's samples to try a new rapid IHC test, which was positive. The department's inspector general, Phyllis Fong, then ordered the Western blot and further testing in England.

The tests on the first 29 were conducted at the Iowa laboratory, not at Texas A&M University, as the Star-Telegram reported Saturday.

The Agriculture Department has not disclosed the name or location of the herd's ranch, widely believed to be a cattle-breeding operation in East Texas. The infected cow was sold at auction Nov. 11 after it had problems delivering its last calf, Rogers said.

Scientists believe that the fatal disease is spread to livestock by feed contaminated with BSE-laden proteins known as prions, passed from rendered parts of cattle. Such ruminant-to-ruminant feed was banned in 1997. Researchers are trying to determine whether there is a spontaneously occurring strain of the disease.

The department has said that samples from the Texas cow showed BSE more akin to that found in France and unlike what was commonly discovered by the British.

All dead and high-risk livestock, including "downer" animals -- those that are alive but cannot walk -- and those showing neurological problems, are removed before entering the food supply. After the animals are killed, samples are sent for testing.

In the Texas case, the 12-year-old cow was discovered dead on arrival on Nov. 15 at a Waco slaughterhouse, H&B Packing. It was then shipped across town to Champion Pet Food. Samples were sent to A&M for the rapid test. The carcass was later sent to College Station and incinerated.

Champion co-owner Rick Bauer said all dead and downer cattle that reach his dog food plant are tested for BSE.

Humans can contract a version of the disease, known as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob, by eating BSE-tainted meat. Of the 153 confirmed cases, most were in Europe. The only victim in the United States was a person who lived in Britain when contaminated beef was available.

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or vCJD, reportedly affects about one person per million per year. In the United States this translates to 250 to 300 new cases per year, according to the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Foundation in Akron, Ohio.

The disease is extremely difficult to diagnose. About 85 percent of all cases fall into one of two categories -- classical and sporadic. The remaining 15 percent are familial, or inherited.

The foundation has also reported a few cases of transmission during medical procedures, with contaminated surgical equipment or instruments suspected as the mechanism of transmission. These cases are referred to as iatrogenic or acquired CJD.

Differentiating these types from the variant disease associated with contaminated beef requires testing after death.

http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/nation/12100440.htm

Greetings,

APPARENTLY OLD ron et al at USDA/APHIS just cannot seem to tell the complete truth about anything anymore, when it comes to these Tejas mad cows. I seem to be a bit confused and concerned about more of his confusion about this cow. let alone why it took them some 8 months to confirm this cow to the public with the proper testing protocol, then took only a few days to locate and test some 29 cows for BSE/TSE. 8 months to get one cow tested correctly and then they test 29 and come up negative in about 2 days? they should be using WB on all these 'cows of interest'. mooving on here, i find interest in the fact that this mad cow they claim was going straight to the pet food plant, in reality, was on it's way to a slaughtering plant, apparently for human consumption, BEFORE going to the pet food plant at Champion in Waco, it went to H&B Packing in Waco, where there it was downed and then sent to the pet food plant. H&B Packing is for human consumption, poultry and red meat slaughter. NOPE, old ron et al did not tell you that did they. IF this downed cow would have shown up at H&B Packing the day before as a sub-clinical BSE/TSE animal, it would have gone right in the human food chain.

ALL COWS AND OTHER ANIMALS FOR HUMAN AND ANIMAL CONSUMPTION MUST BE TESTED FOR BSE/TSE

(not just tested, but tested correctly, with proper and most sensitive protocols for BSE/TSE, and a sworn oath to tell the truth)

ron and johanns gotta go for there roll in this continued cover up of mad cows and the exposure of millions both in the USA and abroad to the USA North American BSE/TSE mad cow agent... TSS

Transcript

Release No. 0235.05
Contact:
Jim Rogers (202) 670-4755


TRANSCRIPT OF TELE-NEWS CONFERENCE WITH DR. JOHN CLIFFORD, CHIEF VETERINARY OFFICER, ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DR. STEPHEN SUNDLOF, DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR VETERINARY MEDICINE, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION AND DR. BOB HILLMAN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, TEXAS ANIMAL HEALTH COMMISSION IN WASHINGTON, DC ON JUNE 29, 2005

snip...

"DNA test results have confirmed that we have identified the source herd of the animal determined last week to be positive for BSE. Based on information we have received from the owner, the cow was born and raised in a herd in Texas and was approximately 12 years old. It was sent to a 3D/4D pet food plant in Texas and was selected for sampling on arrival.

snip...

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usdahome?contentidonly=true&contentid=2005/06/0235.xml

13054 --- H&B Packing Co, Inc. --- 702 Forrest Street --- Waco, TX 76704 --- Slaughter/Cutting --- Red Meat and Poultry

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OFO/export/lsoafric.htm

Bauer, 48, whose family also runs Waco's H&B Packing and has been in the packing plant business since 1949, said anyone in the industry understands the need for increased scrutiny for everything from E. coli to salmonella.

http://www.spcnetwork.com/mii/2005/050638.htm

Food Safety and Inspection Service
United States Department of Agriculture
Washington, D.C. 20250-3700


Pathogen Reduction/HACCP & HACCP Implementation

December 8, 2000

USDA Food Safety And Inspection Service
Quarterly Regulatory And Enforcement Report

July 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


snip...

Table 5. Administrative Actions: Large HACCP Plants
(7/1/00 - 9/30/00)


Basis for Action Appeals and Actions
E.coli SSOP HACCP Other


snip...


H&B Packing Co, Inc.,
13054
Waco, TX 2/2/00 X X Remains in abeyance. Plant previously received a notice of intended enforcement.


snip...


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-3a.htm

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-4a.htm


H&B Packing co,

Inc.,

13054

Waco, TX

X X On 12/15/99 a notice of intended enforcement was issued

based on the plantís failure to meet the Salmonella

performance standard on three consecutive series of FSIS

conducted tests. Decision regarding enforcement pending.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep99-4.pdf


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-4.pdf


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-3.pdf


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-2.pdf


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/haccp/enfrep00-1.pdf


OTHER? OTHER, RIGHT!, reminds me of the infamous 'non species coding system' where anything goes...TSS


2001 H&B Packing anymore mad cows at H&B Packing ???


The frightened cow escaped from H&B Packing Co. across the Brazos River.

'Apparently, one of the gates was left open,' David Bauer, vice president of H&B, said.

'It must have crossed over the interstate and then came to Baylor. We've never had one go to college before,' Bauer said.

Waco animal control officer Bill Vieregge said, 'We got a call, about 12:20 p.m., about a loose cow at the Summer Palace restaurant. Then we had another report that it had gone under the underpass on the interstate and was at the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.'

Jennie Holland, a Double Oak junior, was working at the Wiethorn Visitors Center and saw the cow dodging cars and trucks in front of the Jesse H. Jones Library. Cars were swerving and stopping,' Holland said.

The cow wandered aimlessly on campus porches before sowing its oats and charging students.

Shay Pierce, a Houston sophomore, was studying for a test and looked out the window to see the cow kicking and running.

'I was in the lobby of the computer science building and heard laughter in the hallway. I looked at the music building and saw it running toward some girls. It tried to head butt them,' Pierce said.

http://www.baylor.edu/lariat/news.php?action=story&story=16162

wonder if there was a chance they tested this cow for BSE/TSE, or if it went into the food chain?

BSE Symptoms in Cattle

Changes in temperament such as nervousness or aggression
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PPT/BSE_Overview_Awareness_Alt/index.asp

NON SPECIES CODING SYSTEM AND BSE/TSE

Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From ...
TSS) > The data do not provide a species of origin code for these ... more of
the USA infamous 'non-species coding system', wonder how many of these species ...
www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html - 56k - Cached - Similar pages

Docket Management Docket: 96N-0417 - Current Good Manufacturing ...
... and other glands. with the infamous NSCS non species coding system. this ...
[TSS] CJD Watch, my Mom died from hvCJD and we are tracking CJD world-wide. ...
www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ dailys/03/Mar03/031403/96N-0417-EC-2.htm - 61k - Cached - Similar pages
[ More results from www.fda.gov ]

Forums - WHAT ABOUT ANIMAL PROTEINS IN THE USA AND THE 8/4/97 FEED ...
are? some more of that non-species coding i imagine? that non-species coding
system comes in real handy i would imagine on both exports, imports and even ...
www.prwatch.org/forum/archive/index.php/t-1378.html - 27k - Cached - Similar pages

Human Animal TSEs NORTH AMERICA Subject: The Pathological Protein ...
TSS). > The data do not provide a species of origin code for these > ... more on
non-species coding system and TSEs and potential 'suitcase bombs' ...
www.agobservatory.org/library.cfm?refID=30390 - 198k - Cached - Similar pages

still disgusted in 2005 in Bacliff, Texas ...TSS




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