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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: TRANSCRIPT Release No. 0235.05 TEXAS MAD COW
Date: June 30, 2005 at 8:53 am PST

In Reply to: TRANSCRIPT Release No. 0235.05 TEXAS MAD COW posted by TSS on June 29, 2005 at 9:33 pm:

Greetings,


>>>Based on information we have received from the owner, the cow was born and raised in a herd in Texas and was approximately 12 years old.<<<


>>>We are also interested in any of this animal's offspring that were born within the last 2 years.<<<


>>>"The source herd is now under a hold order as we identify animals of interest within the herd. Consistent with OIE guidelines, animals of interest would include any other animals that were born the same year as this animal, as well as any born the year before and the year after.<<<


>>>Given the animal's age, we believe it was most likely infected by consuming feed prior to the implementation of the ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in 1997. <<<


o.k., let me get this straight.

they figure the cow is 12 years old.

they figure the cow consumbed tainted ruminant feed BEFORE the partial and voluntary 8/4/97 feed ban that most did not adhere too and others simply did not know about.

could be the cow and it's cohorts and or offsprings consumbed this tainted feed way back to early 1990, years and years before this feed ban.

WHY then are they only going back just a year or two for traceback of offspring and cohorts and feed this animal consumbed, and all other animals that consumbed this same product?


>>>"Experience worldwide has shown us that it is highly unusual to find BSE in more than one animal in a herd or in an affected animal's offspring<<<


A BSE case born in May 2002
BSE has been diagnosed in a Holstein Friesian cross cow, born on 1 May
2002. The case was identified under the current compulsory testing
programme for all animals born after 31 July 1996 slaughtered as cohorts of
confirmed BSE cases. This animal was included in the cohort of the BSE
case born on 3 October 2001 on the same farm and confirmed on 1 March
2005. This case born on 1 May 2002 was born on the same farm in Dyfed
and it remained on this farm until it was submitted for slaughter on 12 May
2005. Disease was officially confirmed on 27 May 2005. The animal was
aged 36 months at slaughter.
This is the most recently born case of BSE confirmed in the UK. The previous
most recent case was the related case born on 3 October 2001.
Another case born on the same farm on 28 September 2001 has been
confirmed on 27 May 2005 in the same cohort. This is the first time that the
UK has confirmed three cases born after July 1996 with the same farm of
origin. Defra will be following up detailed epidemiological analysis of this
case.
This case is being drawn to the attention of SEAC and Professor William Hill.
Professor Hill is currently carrying out an independent assessment of the
possible causes of BSE cases born after the reinforced feed ban of August
1996 (BARBs) at the request of Defra.

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/controls-eradication/barbinfo/01-05-2002.pdf

TSS


----- Original Message -----
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To:
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 10:49 PM
Subject: Statement by USDA Chief Veterinarian John Clifford Regarding the Epidemiological Investigation Into the Recently Confirmed BSE Case


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Statement by USDA Chief Veterinarian John Clifford Regarding the Epidemiological Investigation Into the Recently Confirmed BSE Case

June 29, 2005

"DNA test results have confirmed that we have identified the source herd of the animal determined last week to be positive for BSE. Based on information we have received from the owner, the cow was born and raised in a herd in Texas and was approximately 12 years old. It was sent to a 3D/4D pet food plant in Texas and was selected for sampling on arrival.

"The source herd is now under a hold order as we identify animals of interest within the herd. Consistent with OIE guidelines, animals of interest would include any other animals that were born the same year as this animal, as well as any born the year before and the year after. If the age of the animal cannot be pinpointed, then we may expand our inquiry to include all animals in this herd before the feed ban went into place in 1997. We are also interested in any of this animal's offspring that were born within the last 2 years.

"Experience worldwide has shown us that it is highly unusual to find BSE in more than one animal in a herd or in an affected animal's offspring. Nevertheless, all animals of interest will be tested for BSE.

"We are also working with the Food and Drug Administration in an effort to determine the feed history in this herd. Given the animal's age, we believe it was most likely infected by consuming feed prior to the implementation of the ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in 1997.

"I emphasize that this animal did not enter the human food chain. The plant at which this animal was sampled is a 3D/4D pet food plant that does not handle animals for human consumption and, in this case, did not use the animal in the production of pet food. The animal remains were incinerated.

"The testing and traceback efforts may yield further information as to how this animal became infected. The safety of our food supply is not in question. I am very confident that our interlocking safeguards are effective, and this case is evidence of that. USDA bans non-ambulatory cattle from the food supply. USDA bans animal parts that could carry BSE from the food supply. USDA bans slaughter techniques that could introduce BSE into the food supply. These safeguards ensure that American beef is among the safest in the world."

#
USDA News
oc.news@usda.gov
202 720-4623


Bovine Spongiform

Encephalopathy

(BSE) EPI Report

Origin of the animal

. The BSE positive cow was born and raised in a

herd in Texas and was approximately 12 years

old, according to information obtained from the

owner. It was sent to a 3D/4D pet food plant in

Texas and was selected for sampling on arrival.

. The animal was non-ambulatory and did not enter

the human food or animal feed chain. The

remains of the animal were incinerated.

Epidemiological Investigation

. USDA will be working closely with the Texas

Animal Health Commission and the herd owner to

begin tracing any animals of interest for testing.

The source herd is now under a hold order as we

identify animals of interest within the herd.

. Animals of interest would include any other

animals that were born the same year as this

animal, as well as any born the year before and

the year after. Animals of interest would also

include any of this animal's offspring that were

born within the last 2 years.

. If the age of the animal cannot be pinpointed,

then USDA will expand the inquiry to include all

animals in this herd before the feed ban went into

place in 1997.

. USDA will also work with the Food and Drug

Administration in an effort to determine the feed

history in this herd. Given the animal's age, it

was most likely infected by consuming feed prior

to the implementation of the

ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in 1997.

Timeline

. The animal was tested for BSE on Nov. 19,

2004, as part of USDA's intensive surveillance

effort.

. Initial test results from a BSE ELISA rapid test

were inconclusive. The sample was then sent to

USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories

(NVSL) for further testing. Two

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) tests were

conducted and both were negative for BSE.

. At the recommendation of the Inspector General,

the animal was retested with a second

confirmatory test, the Western blot. The results

announced on June 10, 2005 were reactive.

. Additional testing by the United Kingdom's

reference laboratory in Weybridge, England and

NVSL confirmed on June 24, 2005 that the

animal was BSE positive but that the level of

infection was low.

. Due to the fact that this animal was sampled at

the same time as four other animals and parts of

the carcass were stored together, USDA made

the decision to conduct DNA confirmatory testing

before announcing the state of origin.

. DNA testing has now verified that USDA correctly

identified the positive animal.

Factsheet

Veterinary Services June 2005

APHIS

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination

in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national

origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation,

or marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to

all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative

means for communication of program information (Braille, large

print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at

(202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD).

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of

Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence

Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964

(voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and

employer.

Safeguarding American Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service . United States Department of Agriculture .

TSS


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