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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: INTERVIEW - Mad Cow DNA May Offer Clues to Latest US Case
Date: June 19, 2005 at 8:43 pm PST

In Reply to: INTERVIEW - Mad Cow DNA May Offer Clues to Latest US Case posted by TSS on June 19, 2005 at 8:31 pm:


----- Original Message -----
From: "Galyean, Michael"
To:
Cc:
Sent: Saturday, May 28, 2005 3:34 PM
Subject: FW: Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (ANIMALSCI Feedback Form)


Dr. Novakofski:

I recevied the following message and comments regarding your recent paper on prion biology published in the Journal of Animal Science. I hope you will take the time to look over the comments and respond to Mr. Singeltary.

Regards,

Michael Galyean
Editor-in-Chief
Journal of Animal Science

________________________________

From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [mailto:flounder9@verizon.net]
Sent: Thu 5/26/2005 9:20 AM
To: Amanda Kolling
Cc: Galyean, Michael
Subject: Re: Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (ANIMALSCI Feedback Form)


I have forwarded this to Dr. Michael Gaylean as suggested.
thank you........

please note new email address flounder9@verizon.net

any questions or follow ups, please do not hesitate to write...

thank you,

kindest regards,
Terry S. Singeltary Sr.

----- Original Message -----
From: Amanda Kolling
To: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Sent: Thursday, May 26, 2005 8:11 AM
Subject: RE: Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (ANIMALSCI Feedback Form)


Dear Mr. Singeltary,

Thank you for your comments. Contrary to a previous e-mail sent to you by an employee of HighWire, the Journal of Animal Science does accept Letters to the Editor. If you are interested in submitting this as a letter to the editor, I urge you to contact our editor-in-chief, Dr. Michael Gaylean at michael.galyean@ttu.edu.

Best regards,

Amanda Kolling
Technical Editor,
Journal of Animal Science


At 09:11 AM 5/17/2005 -0700, Terry S. Singeltary Sr. wrote:
>------------------------------------------------------------
>Comments sent via JAS Feedback Page
>------------------------------------------------------------
> NAME: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
> EMAIL: flounder@wt.net
> IP ADDRESS: 216.119.139.23
> HOSTNAME: pool139-23.dial-p1.hou.wt.net
> PREVIOUS PAGE: http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/abstract/83/6/1455
> BROWSER: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Win98; en-US; rv:1.0.2)
> Gecko/20030208 Netscape/7.02
> PROMOTIONAL USE: Granted
>------------------------------------------------------------
>COMMENTS:
>J. Anim. Sci. 2005. 83:1455-1476
>© 2005 American Society of Animal Science
>SPECIAL TOPICS
>Prion biology relevant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy1
>J. Novakofski*,2, M. S. Brewer{dagger}, N.
>Mateus-Pinilla{ddagger}, J. Killefer* and R. H. McCusker*
>
>* Departments of Animal Sciences and {dagger} Food
>Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at
>Urbana­Champaign 61801-4737; and {ddagger} Illinois
>Natural History Survey, Center for Wildlife and Plant
>Ecology, Champaign, IL 61820
>
>2 Correspondence: 1503 South Maryland Dr. (phone:
>217-333-6181; e-mail: Jnova@uiuc.edu).
>
>Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and chronic
>wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk are a threat to
>agriculture and natural resources, as well as a human
>health concern. Both diseases are transmissible
>spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), or prion diseases,
>caused by autocatalytic conversion of endogenously
>encoded prion protein (PrP) to an abnormal, neurotoxic
>conformation designated PrPsc. Most mammalian species
>are susceptible to TSE, which, despite a range of
>species-linked names, is caused by a single highly
>conserved protein, with no apparent normal function. In
>the simplest sense, TSE transmission can occur because
>PrPsc is resistant to both endogenous and environmental
>proteinases, although many details remain unclear.
>Questions about the transmission of TSE are central to
>practical issues such as livestock testing, access to
>international livestock markets, and wildlife
>management strategies, as well as intangible issues
>such as consumer confidence in the safety of the meat
>supply. The majority of BSE cases seem to have been
>transmitted by feed containing meat and bone meal from
>infected animals. In the United Kingdom, there was a
>dramatic decrease in BSE cases after neural tissue and,
>later, all ruminant tissues were banned from ruminant
>feed. However, probably because of heightened awareness
>and widespread testing, there is growing evidence that
>new variants of BSE are arising "spontaneously,"
>suggesting ongoing surveillance will continue to find
>infected animals. Interspecies transmission is
>inefficient and depends on exposure, sequence homology,
>TSE donor strain, genetic polymorphism of the host, and
>architecture of the visceral nerves if exposure is by
>an oral route. Considering the low probability of
>interspecies transmission, the low efficiency of oral
>transmission, and the low prion levels in nonnervous
>tissues, consumption of conventional animal products
>represents minimal risk. However, detection of rare
>events is challenging, and TSE literature is
>characterized by subsequently unsupported claims of
>species barriers or absolute tissue safety. This review
>presents an overview of TSE and summarizes recent
>research on pathogenesis and transmission.
>
>Key Words: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy . Chronic
>Wasting Disease . Prion
>
>http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/abstract/83/6/1455
>
> >there is growing evidence that new variants of BSE are
>arising "spontaneously,"
>
>
>THERE is NO evidence of a 'spontaneous' TSE anywhere that
>is infectious and shows the pathology of any natural TSE.
>if i have missed something, could someone please site this
>science to me please.
>
>
> >Considering the low probability of interspecies
>transmission, the low efficiency of oral transmission,
>and the low prion levels in nonnervous tissues,
>consumption of conventional animal products represents
>minimal risk.
>
>
>I DISAGREE with all of the above. all one has to do is
>read transmission
>studies. scrapie infected sheep and goats, CWD infected
>deer and
>elk (who knows how many strains) and undocumented TSEs
>in the
>USA bovine have been rendered and fed to animals for
>humna/animal
>consumption for decades. it's only a pipe dream that
>none of this
>was infectious. to think of a 'spontaneous' TSE as just
>popping
>up from nowhere, is like believing in Santa Claus. remember
>the USA scrapie research in Mission, Texas. IT did NOT look
>like BSE...
>
>
>1: J Infect Dis 1980 Aug;142(2):205-8
>
> Oral transmission of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob
>disease, and scrapie to nonhuman primates.
>
> Gibbs CJ Jr, Amyx HL, Bacote A, Masters CL,
>Gajdusek DC.
>
> Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of humans and
>scrapie disease of sheep and goats were transmitted to
>squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that were exposed
>to the infectious agents only by their nonforced
>consumption of known infectious tissues. The
>asymptomatic incubation period in the one monkey
>exposed to the virus of kuru was 36 months; that in the
>two monkeys exposed to the virus of Creutzfeldt-Jakob
>disease was 23 and 27 months, respectively; and that in
>the two monkeys exposed to the virus of scrapie was 25
>and 32 months, respectively. Careful physical
>examination of the buccal cavities of all of the
>monkeys failed to reveal signs or oral lesions. One
>additional monkey similarly exposed to kuru has
>remained asymptomatic during the 39 months that it has
>been under observation.
>
>PMID: 6997404
>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=6997404&dopt=Abstract
>
>
>3. You will recall that the advice provided by
>Professor Smith in
>1993 and by Dr. Gore this month used the sub-population
>of dairy
>farm workers who had had a case of BSE on their farms -
>63,000, which is approximately half the number of dairy
>farm
>workers - as a denominator. If the above sums are
>repeated using
>this denominator population, taking an annual incidence
>in the general
>population of 1 per million the observed rate in this
>sub-population
>is 10 TIMES, and taking an annual incidence of 0.7 per
>million,
>IT IS 15 TIMES (THE ''WORST CASE'' SCENARIO) than
>that in the general population...
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/01/31004001.pdf
>
>
>It was, however, performed in the USA in 1979, when it
>was shown that
>cattle inoculated with the scrapie agent endemic in the
>flock of Suffolk
>sheep at the United States Department of Agriculture in
>Mission, Texas,
>developed a TSE quite unlike BSE. 32 <
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820543
>
>The findings of the initial transmission, though not of
>the clinical or
>neurohistological examination, were communicated in
>October 1988 to Dr
>Watson, Director of the CVL, following a visit by Dr
>Wrathall, one of
>the project leaders in the Pathology Department of the
>CVL, to the
>United States Department of Agriculture. 33
>
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820546
>
>
>The results were not published at this point, since the
>attempted
>transmission to mice from the experimental cow brain
>had been
>inconclusive. The results of the clinical and
>histological differences
>between scrapie-affected sheep and cattle were
>published in 1995.
>Similar studies in which cattle were inoculated
>intracerebrally with
>scrapie inocula derived from a number of
>scrapie-affected sheep of
>different breeds and from different States, were
>carried out at the US
>National Animal Disease Centre. 34
>
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820549
>
>
>The results, published in 1994, showed that this source
>of scrapie
>agent, though pathogenic for cattle, did not produce
>the same clinical
>signs of brain lesions characteristic of BSE.
>
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm
>
>
>Visit to USA ... info on BSE and Scrapie
>
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1988/10/00001001.pdf
>
>
>HOUND STUDY
>
>AS implied in the Inset 25 we must not _ASSUME_ that
>transmission of BSE to other species will invariably
>present pathology typical of a scrapie-like disease.
>
>snip...
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/01/04004001.pdf
>
>
>In Confidence - Perceptions of unconventional slow
>virus diseases
>of animals in the USA - APRIL-MAY 1989 - G A H Wells
>
>
>http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf
>
>WHY is USA insisting _now_ not to use WB, when on the
>1st _confirmed_
>case Dec. 23, 2003
>USA mad cow, WB was used ???
>
>maybe this is the reason ;
>
>JAPAN BSE # 8 & 9 cow
>
>8. 6/10/2003 Holstein Steer 13/10/2001 23 mths
>No clinical signs WB+, IHC-, HP-
>
>
>9. 4/11/2003 Holstein Steer 13/1/2002
>21 mths No clinical signs WB+, IHC-, HP-
>
>===========
>
>More information on the first 11 Japanese BSE-cases can
>be found on the

>website of the Japanese Embassy in the US:
>
>http://www.us.emb-japan.go.jp/english/html/fafacts/bse/bse.htm
>
>
>IN fact, the new strain of TSE in cattle BaSE, does not
>look like nvCJD in humans, but very similar
>to the sporadic CJD;
>
>
>BASE in cattle in Italy of Identification of a second
>bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy: Molecular
>similarities with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
>
>http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0305777101v1
>
>
>Adaptation of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy
>agent to primates and comparison with Creutzfeldt-
>Jakob disease: Implications for human health THE
>findings from Corinne Ida Lasmézas*, [dagger] ,
>Jean-Guy Fournier*, Virginie Nouvel*, Hermann Boe*,
>Domíníque Marcé*, François Lamoury*, Nicolas Kopp
>[Dagger ] , Jean-Jacques Hauw§, James Ironside¶, Moira
>Bruce [||] , Dominique Dormont*, and Jean-Philippe
>Deslys* et al, that The agent responsible for French
>iatrogenic growth hormone-linked CJD taken as a control
>is very different from vCJD but is similar to that
>found in one case of sporadic CJD and one sheep scrapie
>isolate;
>
>
>http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/041490898v1
>
>
>Characterization of two distinct prion strains derived
>from bovine spongiform encephalopathy transmissions to
>inbred mice
>
>
> http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/8/2471
>
>
>USA BSE GBR III
>
>http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/574/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_annex_en1.pdf
>
>http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt
>
>https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/0/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08d?OpenDocument
>
>https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed
>
>
>Terry S. Singeltary SR.
>P.O. Box 42
>Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

La Vonne Gallo
HighWire Press
1454 Page Mill Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304
fax: 650.725.9335
lgallo@highwire.stanford.edu

~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




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