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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: Transcript Ag. Secretary Mike Johanns and Dr. John Clifford, Regarding further analysis of BSE Inconclusive Test Results
Date: June 13, 2005 at 9:23 am PST

Original Message -----
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To:
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2005 5:09 PM
Subject: Re: Transcript of Tele-News Conference with Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns and Dr. John Clifford, Regarding further analysis of BSE Inconclusive Test Results


> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################
>
> Release No. 0207.05
> Contact:
> USDA Press Office (202)720-4623
>
>
> Transcript of Tele-News Conference with Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns
> and Dr. John Clifford, Chief Veterinary Officer, Animal Plant Health
> Inspection Service Regarding further analysis of BSE Inconclusive Test
> Results Washington, D.C.
> June 10, 2005
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> DR. CLIFFORD: "Thank you, Mr. Secretary.
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&con
> tentid=2005/06/0207.xml
>
>
> >>>"In addition, there are definite differences between these two tests. The
> IHC is internationally recognized, and why we chose that for our enhanced
> surveillance program is because that particular test does two things. It
> allows you to visualize the anatomic location where the lesions are most
> likely to be found which is the obex. At the same time it uses a staining
> technique on the prions, on abnormal prions in the tissue in that location.
> ...<<<
>
>
> ANOTHER reason is by only looking at one portion of the brain, you miss the
> rest of the brain that could be potentally infected. kinda like a 1 in 10
> chance of finding
> something. but this is par for the course with these folks....TSS
>
>
> USDA 2003
>
> We have to be careful that we don't get so set in the way we do things that
> we
> forget to look for different emerging variations of disease. We've gotten
> away from collecting the whole brain in our systems. We're using the brain
> stem and we're looking in only one area. In Norway, they were doing a
> project and looking at cases of Scrapie, and they found this where they did
> not find lesions or PRP in the area of the obex. They found it in the
> cerebellum and the cerebrum. It's a good lesson for us. Ames had to go
> back and change the procedure for looking at Scrapie samples. In the USDA,
> we had routinely looked at all the sections of the brain, and then we got
> away from it. They've recently gone back.
> Dr. Keller: Tissues are routinely tested, based on which tissue provides an
> 'official' test result as recognized by APHIS
> .
>
> Dr. Detwiler: That's on the slaughter. But on the clinical cases, aren't
> they still asking for the brain? But even on the slaughter, they're looking
> only at the brainstem. We may be missing certain things if we confine
> ourselves to one area.
>
>
> snip.............
>
>
> Dr. Detwiler: It seems a good idea, but I'm not aware of it.
> Another important thing to get across to the public is that the negatives
> do not guarantee absence of infectivity. The animal could be early in the
> disease and the incubation period. Even sample collection is so important.
> If you're not collecting the right area of the brain in sheep, or if
> collecting lymphoreticular tissue, and you don't get a good biopsy, you
> could miss the area with the PRP in it and come up with a negative test.
> There's a new, unusual form of Scrapie that's been detected in Norway. We
> have to be careful that we don't get so set in the way we do things that we
> forget to look for different emerging variations of disease. We've gotten
> away from collecting the whole brain in our systems. We're using the brain
> stem and we're looking in only one area. In Norway, they were doing a
> project and looking at cases of Scrapie, and they found this where they did
> not find lesions or PRP in the area of the obex. They found it in the
> cerebellum and the cerebrum. It's a good lesson for us. Ames had to go
> back and change the procedure for looking at Scrapie samples. In the USDA,
> we had routinely looked at all the sections of the brain, and then we got
> away from it. They've recently gone back.
>
> Dr. Keller: Tissues are routinely tested, based on which tissue provides an
> 'official' test result as recognized by APHIS
> .
>
> Dr. Detwiler: That's on the slaughter. But on the clinical cases, aren't
> they still asking for the brain? But even on the slaughter, they're looking
> only at the brainstem. We may be missing certain things if we confine
> ourselves to one area.
>
>
> snip...
>
>
> FULL TEXT;
>
>
> Completely Edited Version
> PRION ROUNDTABLE
>
>
> Accomplished this day, Wednesday, December 11, 2003, Denver, Colorado
>
>
> http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/94543.html
>
>
> TSS
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
> To:
> Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2005 3:33 PM
> Subject: Re: Transcript of Tele-News Conference with Agriculture Secretary
> Mike Johanns and Dr. John Clifford, Regarding further analysis of BSE
> Inconclusive Test Results
>





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