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From: TSS ()
Subject: Imported Ukrainian canned beef Recall Notification Report 038-2004 and mad cow disease
Date: May 18, 2005 at 7:18 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Imported Ukrainian canned beef Recall Notification Report 038-2004 and mad cow disease
Date: Wed, 18 May 2005 21:11:25 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: BSE-L


Recall Notification Report 038-2004

Product(s) Recalled:
Imported Ukrainian canned beef, pork, and poultry products.

Production Dates/Identifying Codes:
Produced July 2004. The products being detained are various weight cans
(product labels

are printed in Cyrillic):

* "Pork Stew, Pork Stew in its own Juice."
* "Liver Spread, Liver Spread in Oil."
* "Liver Spread, Liver Spread in Pork Fat."
* "Chicken Meat, Baby Chicken Meat."
* "Kasha, Rice with Beef."
* "Kasha, Buckwheat with Beef."
* "Beef Stew, Beef Stew in its Own Sauce."


Problem/Reason for Recall:
The products were imported from the Ukraine, which is ineligible to
export to the United States.

How/When Discovered:
On October 6, 2004 the Recall Management Staff was notified by OPEER
that the Florida Department of Agriculture had observed, photographed
and held product at Odessa International Foods in Boca Raton, Florida.
The Importer of Record was later identified as New World Amazing
International, Inc.

Federal Establishment:
Not Applicable
New World Amazing International, Inc.
708-710 Armstrong Drive
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089

Consumer Contact:
Milana Grosfiler, Manager, (847) 537-1337

Media Contact:
Milana Grosfiler, Manager, (847) 537-1337

Quantity Recalled:
Undetermined amount

Distribution:
Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Recall Classification:
Class I

Recall Notification Level:
Retail

Press Release:
USDA Detains Canned Meat and Poultry Products From Ukraine

(includes photos)

Direct Notification Means:
The firm has notified its customers orally and will follow-up in writing.

FSIS Follow-up Activities:
: Effectiveness checks by the FSIS, Office of Program Evaluation,
Enforcement and Review (OPEER).

Other Agencies Involved:
None

FSIS Contacts:

* Compliance/Recall Coordinator: (630) 620-7474
* Recall Management Staff: (202) 690-6389
* Media Inquiries: (202) 720-9113
* Congressional Inquiries: (202) 720-3897
* Consumer Inquiries: 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854); TTY,
1-800-256-7072
* Web Site: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/
(FSIS Main Page) or
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/
(Recall
Information)


Date of Recall Meeting:
October 06, 2004

Recall Case Number:
038-2004

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fsis_Recalls/RNR_038_2004/index.asp


USDA Detains Canned Meat and Poultry Products From Ukraine

Recall Release CLASS I RECALL
FSIS-RC-038-2004 HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Congressional and Public Affairs
(202) 720-9113; FAX: (202) 690-0460
Matt Baun

WASHINGTON, Oct. 6, 2004 - USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service
today announced that it is detaining an undetermined amount of canned
meat and poultry products that entered the country from Ukraine. Ukraine
is not eligible to export meat, poultry or egg products into the U.S.
New World Amazing International Inc., a Buffalo Grove, Ill., importing
firm, is also voluntarily recalling the product.

The products being detained and recalled are various weight cans of:

Note: the following product labels are printed in Cyrillic. Photographs
of these labels

can be viewed on the FSIS Web site at www.fsis.usda.gov

* "Pork Stew, Pork Stew in its own Juice."
* "Liver Spread, Liver Spread in Oil."
* "Liver Spread, Liver Spread in Pork Fat."
* "Chicken Meat, Baby Chicken Meat."
* "Kasha, Rice with Beef."
* "Kasha, Buckwheat with Beef."
* "Beef Stew, Beef Stew in its Own Juice."


FSIS has received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of
this product. However, these products could present a health hazard to
consumers because Ukraine is not among the countries that are approved
to export meat and poultry into the U.S. As such, these products have
not been inspected by FSIS. Anyone concerned about an illness should
contact a physician.

FSIS has taken immediate steps to remove this product from commerce and
continues to investigate whether any unlawful actions have occurred.
Consumers who have purchased any meat or poultry product imported from
Ukraine are urged not to eat it but to return it to the place of purchase.

The products were distributed to Eastern European specialty food and
gourmet markets in Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio
and Wisconsin.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall may call Milana
Grosfiler, company manager, at (847) 537-1337.

Consumers with food safety questions can phone the toll-free USDA Meat
and Poultry Hotline at l-888-MPHotline. The hotline can be reached from
l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday, and recorded
food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.
Product label photos:

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable
probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse
health consequences or death.
Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote
probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.
Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not
cause adverse health consequences.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_038_2004_Release/index.asp

[4]
Date: Tues 12 Dec 2000
From: Marjorie P. Pollack
Source: The St. Petersburg Times


MOSCOW - With jitters over mad cow disease sweeping Europe, Russians were
jarred this week when the fatal disease appeared to have struck close to
home. Ukraine's Emergency Situations Ministry (ESM) announced Thursday [7
Dec 2000?] that 2 cows infected with BSE had died in the village of Simonov
in the Rovno region. Ukraine is Russia's main supplier of beef, providing
about 70 percent of the market, according to the Russian Meat Union.

An employee with the Rovno regional headquarters of the ESM, Col. Viktor
Simonyuk, said that it was unclear how the cows had become infected. "We
are currently trying to find a reason for what happened," said
Simonyuk. "We must introduce quarantines, vaccines and screen all cows for
the presence of the dangerous disease."

However, other Ukrainian authorities questioned the ESM's assessment,
saying the region did not even have the resources needed to detect the
disease. "Our [ESM] has got something wrong," said Alexander Kostuk, the
head doctor at the Rovno veterinarian department. Valentina Titorenko, a
deputy head at the Agriculture Ministry, added that "2 cows did indeed die
from a form of rabies, but this was the normal kind, the kind that affects
foxes and dogs."

While fears about mad cow disease have wreaked havoc on European food
markets, there have been no recorded cases of it in Russia. Russian
officials said that it is very difficult to find out whether the disease
has crossed into Russia. "It's just that many Russian and Ukrainian vets
do not have the means to diagnose BSE," said Viktor Yatskin at the Russian
Meat Union. European experts believe that there is a link between the
disease and the use of ground bone in animal feed, of which Russia imported
117 967 tons last year, according to State Customs Committee data. Russian
Meat Union chairman Musheg Mamikonyan said the feed is mostly used for
pigs, while cattle are fed hay or pasture grass. Yatskin disagreed. "In
Russia, bone powder has traditionally been used to feed all animals," he
said.

[This situation appears to be rife with speculation, as this report lacks
enough specifics to convince me one way or another. If there is any
disagreement over the causative agent, I would definitively NOT favor the
guy who wants to vaccinate his way out of this situation. There is no
substitute for getting an accurate diagnosis, and we would certainly like
to get one. - Mod.PC]

******

http://www.fas.org/ahead/disease/tse/2000/dis-tse-001218-apjap.htm
http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:6yLYzJLwVR4J:www.fas.org/ahead/disease/tse/2000/dis-tse-001218-apjap.htm+ukraine+bse&hl=en


General news


Possible case of BSE in Ukraine

Ukraine news agency sources have reported that laboratory tests have
confirmed a case of mad cow disease in the country.13 The report is
attributed to the Ukrainian Emergencies Ministry, and says that the cow
died on a private farm in the village of Ostrovsk, Zarichynskyy
District, Rivne Region.

A news report in December 2000 stated that Ukraine had two cases of BSE,
but this was later denied by officials. A further case was reported by
Pravda in September 2001 but was never confirmed.

An article in the Russian Journal in June warned that, following reports
of BSE in cattle in Poland, it would not be long before the disease
arrived in Russia.14 The article said that Russian beef producers have
warned that poor controls at customs and in local meat production are
putting Russian livestock at risk.

http://www.priondata.org/components/July2002.doc.

http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:CKUiY7eI2EUJ:www.priondata.org/components/July2002.doc+ukraine+bse&hl=en


Ukraine is situated in the south-eastern part of Central Europe and has
its own territory, government, national emblem, flag and anthem. It
borders on Russia, Byelorussia, Moldova, Slovakia, Roumania, Hungary and
Poland on land and Russia, Georgia, Bulgaria, Roumania and Turkey on sea.

http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:b0_KZxTbi2IJ:www.priondata.org/components/June2002.doc+ukraine+bse&hl=en

http://www.ukraine.org/


i dont think they even submitted a BSE GBR risk assessment,
but the countries around them have;

Opinion of the
Scientific Steering Committee
on the
GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF
BOVINE SPONGIFORM
ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR) in
HUNGARY
Adopted on 30/03/2001

snip...

THE ANALYSIS
Hungary was exposed to high external challenge from 1980-1993 and very high
since 1994.

snip...

It is concluded that it is likely but not confirmed that one or several
cattle that are
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE agent are currently
present in
the domestic herd of Hungary (GBR III).
Given the extremely unstable system and the fact that the BSE-agent is
likely to be
already present in the country due to live cattle and MBM imports, it is
assumed
that the GBR is increasing.

snip...

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out187_en.pdf


Opinion of the
Scientific Steering Committee
on the
GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF
BOVINE SPONGIFORM
ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR) in
POLAND
Adopted on 30/03/2001

snip...

THE ANALYSIS
Poland was exposed to a very low challenge between 1980-86, a very high
external challenge between 1987-90 and an extremely high external challenge
since 1991, mainly due to massive imports of MBM from BSE affected countries
(in the range of 1,700,000 tonnes in total, mainly from DE: around 1,000,000
tonnes in total). High imports of cattle are also recorded for the
period since 1988.
The BSE/cattle system of Poland was and is very unstable since 1980.
Feeding MBM to cattle was legally possible until March 1997 and is
likely to have
occurred, even if it was uncommon practice. The efficiency of the
feed-ban cannot
be assessed, as feed controls were apparently not carried out. Rendering
is and was
common practice in Poland. Material includes ruminant material,
including SRM,
condemned material, and a limited proportion of fallen stock. The rendering
processes used were adequate for reducing BSE-infectivity since a long time.
There is no SRM ban. Cross contamination is most probable (no specified feed
lines, no controls described). BSE is notifiable since 1997 and
surveillance was
nearly non existent until 1997. Since 1977, passive surveillance does
not fulfil OIE
requirements. Active surveillance has started in 2001.
It is concluded that it is likely but not confirmed that one or several
cattle that are
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE agent are currently
present in
the domestic herd of Poland (GBR III).
Given the very unstable system and the fact that the BSE-agent is likely
to be
already present in the country, it is assumed that the GBR is increasing.

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out200_en.pdf

Report on the assessment of the Geographical BSE-risk of Slovak Republic
March 2001
Report on
the Assessment of
the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the
SLOVAK REPUBLIC
MARCH ARCH 2001

snip...

5. CONCLUSION ON THE GEOGRAPHICAL BSE-RISK
5.1 The current GBR as function of the past stability and challenge
• The current geographical BSE-risk (GBR) level is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that
domestic cattle are (clinically or pre-clinically) infected with the
BSE-agent.
5.2 The expected development of the GBR as a function of the past and
present stability and challenge
• As long as the system remains neutrally stable, the probability of
cattle to be (pre-clinically
or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent will remain as it is, as long
as no further external
challenge occurs.
• Any further external challenge would again increase the GBR.
• If the stability is improved and this improvement is confirmed by
favourable control results
on feeding, rendering and SRMs, the GBR will decrease over time.

snip...

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out202_en.pdf

Opinion of the
Scientific Steering Committee
on the
GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF
BOVINE SPONGIFORM
ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR) in
Slovenia
Adopted by the SSC on 13 September 2002

snip...

CONCLUSION ON THE CURRENT GBR
The BSE-agent was potentially imported into the country via infected MBM
in the mid 90s when
MBM imports peaked. This MBM reached cattle via feed. It can be expected
that the 1997 birth
cohort had a much lower chance to be infected because MBM imports
decreased dramatically and
the first feed ban was introduced. Although the rendering system was
able to reduce BSE
infectivity since 1992, some recycling and propagation may have occurred
because SRM were not
removed and therefore rendered.
The first domestic BSE-case in Slovenia was identified in November 2001
and a second case was
confirmed in January 2002. It is therefore confirmed (GBR III) that
domestic cattle in Slovenia
are (clinically or pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent at a low
incidence.

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out285_en.pdf

Report on the assessment of the Geographical BSE-risk of Romania 11/05/2001
FINAL INAL REPORT EPORT
ON THE ASSESSMENT SSESSMENT
OF THE
GEOGRAPHICAL EOGRAPHICAL BSE R RISK OF
ISK ROMANIA OMANIA
MAY AY 2001

snip...

5. CONCLUSION ON THE GEOGRAPHICAL BSE-RISK
5.1 The current GBR as function of the past stability and challenge
• The current geographical BSE-risk (GBR) level is III, i.e. it is
likely but not
confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or pre-clinically)
infected with the
BSE-agent.

snip...

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out213_en.pdf

- 1 -
Opinion of the
Scientific Steering Committee
on the
GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF
BOVINE SPONGIFORM
ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR) in
Turkey
Adopted by the SSC on 27 June 2002

snip...

CONCLUSION ON THE CURRENT GBR
The very unstable BSE/cattle system of Turkey was exposed to a high and
very high external
challenge since the early 80s. It is therefore likely that the BSE agent
was introduced into the
country and recycled and amplified. As the system is still regarded to
be unstable it is concluded
that it is likely but not confirmed that one or several domestic cattle
are (pre-clinically or
clinically) infected with the BSE-agent (GBR III).

snip...

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out276b_en.pdf

i missed a few of the others, but you get my drift.

damn, maybe they been talking to GW and his BSE MRR TEXAS
policy of just rendering the damn things head, spinal cord and all,
or just not using WB to confirm the positive, positives...TSS





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