SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS ()
Subject: USA JOHANNS FUMBLES THE BSE BALL AGAIN, DELAYS NATIONAL ID SYSTEM FOR CATTLE UNTIL 2009
Date: May 10, 2005 at 12:28 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: U.S. Delays National ID System for Cattle and Other Animals to 2009
Date: Tue, 10 May 2005 11:05:34 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@aegee.org


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

U.S. Delays National ID System for Cattle and Other Animals to 2009

Canadian Press, May 05, 2005

WASHINGTON (CP) - The U.S. government isn't aiming to have a national
identification system for cows and other animals in place until 2009,
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said Thursday. The system, sparked by
the country's lone case of mad cow disease nearly 18 months ago, would
become mandatory that year, allowing authorities to quickly track and
isolate animal health threats.

"I'm a little surprised they delayed it that far," said Steve Dittmer,
executive vice-president of the Agribusiness Freedom Foundation.

"They're delayed it by two or three years from what most people thought
it would be. It's a recognition of the fact that the technology isn't as
good as it needs to be."

Johanns said the issue is too important to get wrong.

"We're looking at such a huge initiative," said Amy Spillman, spokesman
for the U.S. Agriculture Department.

"We want to get industry input. We want to have as much people involved
as possible."

Canada has had an ID system for cows since before its first mad cow case
was discovered in May 2003.

Authorities north of the border began requiring ear tags with
identifying bar codes the year before on any animal leaving its herd of
origin. By September 2006, those tags will be updated to radio-frequency
devices.

The system allowed Canadian officials to quickly trace and isolate
potential threats from each of its three cases of bovine spongiform
encephalopathy.

"Obviously, we would like to have everyone on the same level," Megan
Gauley of the Canadian Cattle Identification Agency, said of plans in
the U.S.

"But our main mandate is focusing on the Canadian herd."

The U.S. banned imports of Canadian cattle two years ago. Trade was
supposed to resume in March but has been blocked by a legal challenge
from a ranchers' group based in Montana.

Arguments on the long-term future of the border are scheduled to be
heard July 27. Meanwhile, the USDA is appealing a temporary injunction
barring trade until then but no date has been set.

Industry observers said it won't occur before May 26, the deadline for
all briefs to be submitted to the court.

U.S. officials have consulted Canada on its identification system but
may not decide to go the same route.

Regardless, Canada's system will be applicable in the U.S. if and when
the cattle trade resumes, said Spillman.

The U.S. ID plan will also cover pigs, chickens and other livestock,
amounting to billions of animals.

Cattle ranchers estimate it will cost about $550 million US over five
years and some want a lower-technology, lower-cost solution, like
hot-iron branding.

The system would require states to register ranches, feed lots,
livestock barns, packing plants and other facilities by July 2008.
Mandatory reporting of livestock movement would begin the next year.

© The Canadian Press, 2005

http://www.mycattle.com/news/dsp_regulatory_article.cfm?storyid=17149

> Johanns said the issue is too important to get wrong.
>

THIS guy should resign or be booted out of office.
HE will expose everyone in the United States to animal TSEs
with his stupidity and marriage to the industry...

TSS

#################### https://lists.aegee.org/bse-l.html ####################






Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: