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From: TSS ()
Subject: BSE in Germany -- UPDATE COVERING 2004-2005 GAIN REPORT : 1/26/05
Date: April 18, 2005 at 7:58 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: BSE in Germany - Update Covering 2004 2005 GAIN Report Number: GM5006 Date: 1/26/2005
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:52:12 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTS.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Voluntary Report - public distribution
Date: 1/26/2005
GAIN Report Number: GM5006
GM5006
Germany
Livestock and Products
BSE in Germany - Update Covering 2004
2005
Approved by:
Karina Ramos
U.S. Embassy, Berlin
Prepared by:
Sabine M Lieberz
Report Highlights:
In 2004, 65 cases of BSE were confirmed in Germany, compared to 54 in
2003, and 106 in
2002. Until January 19, 2005, one additional case was confirmed, taking
the number of
confirmed BSE cases since the first detection of BSE in Germany in
November 2000, to a
total of 358. In Germany all cattle older than 24 month at slaughter
have to be tested for
BSE, compared to 30 months in the EU. The ongoing discussion about
testing age will likely
result in a change to 30 months in the second half of 2005.
Includes PSD Changes: No
Includes Trade Matrix: No
Unscheduled Report
Berlin [GM1]
[GM]
USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
GAIN Report
Global Agriculture Information Network
Template Version 2.09
GAIN Report - GM5006 Page 2 of 4
UNCLASSIFIED USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
In 2004, 65 cases of BSE were confirmed, compared to 54 in 2003. The
German Ministry of
Consumer Protection, Food, and Agriculture views this increase in BSE
cases as being still
within the expected range, as all confirmed animals were older than 4
years (48 month) and
born before the introduction of the meat- and bonemeal (MBM) ban in
animal feed.
As of December 31, 2004, the total number of confirmed BSE cases in
Germany amounted to
357 cases. Out of these, 7 cases were detected in 2000, 125 cases in
2001, and 106 cases
in 2002, 54 cases in 2003, and 65 in 2004. From January 1 through 19,
2005, one additional
case was confirmed. The geographical distribution of the confirmed cases
is shown in table
1.
Table 1: Geographical distribution of confirmed BSE cases in Germany,
as of December 31, 2004.
Number of confirmed BSE cases Number of
cattle in
that
state*
Total
cases
per 1
million
head
State
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 total
Bavaria 5 59 27 21 21 133 3,824,100 35
Lower-Saxony 1 17 27 7 14 66 2,652,800 25
Baden-Wuerttemberg - 12 11 9 6 38 1,162,100 33
Schleswig-Holstein 1 12 14 1 1 29 1,241,500 23
North Rhine-Westphalia - 2 2 4 8 16 1,401,000 11
Brandenburg - 3 4 3 3 13 613,000 21
Saxony - 4 4 3 2 13 522,200 25
Rhineland-Palatinate - 4 6 - 2 12 427,500 28
Saxony-Anhalt - 4 4 1 1 10 373,100 27
Mecklenburg-West Pomerania - 2 4 - 3 9 563,100 16
Hesse - 3 2 2 2 9 497,600 18
Thuringia - 2 1 3 2 8 374,200 21
Saarland - 1 - - - 1 59,100 17
Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg - - - - - 0 20,600 0
Total 7 125 106 54 65 357 13,731,900 26
* Based on an animal census November 2002
(Source: German Federal Ministry for Consumer Protection, Food and
Agriculture)
BSE tests
In 2004, a total of 2,486,127 BSE tests were conducted in Germany, of
which 65 BSE cases
were confirmed. Out of these, 35 cases were discovered through routine
testing at
slaughter. All other cases were either detected through mandatory
testing of “risk animals.”
Risk animals, include perished animals, animals that died on transport,
downers (i.e. nonambulatory
animals), animals that show any kind of disease symptoms, animals that show
clinical BSE symptoms, or were part of destroyed herds or cohorts of a
previously confirmed
BSE case (birth cohort = animals born on the same farm within 12 month
before or after the
birth, feeding cohort = animals that were raised together with animal
with confirmed BSE
within the first 12 months of life of the latter, all offspring).
GAIN Report - GM5006 Page 3 of 4
UNCLASSIFIED USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
Since January 25, 2001, BSE tests at slaughter became mandatory in
Germany for all cattle
above the age of 24 months. However, some retail chains require the
testing of all cattle,
irrespective of age. Testing below the age of 24 month is purely for
marketing reasons and
does not supply any additional value in terms of BSE measures, as tests
on younger animals
are not very reliable. In 2001 – 2003, between 65 and 70 percent of all
cattle and calves
slaughtered in Germany were tested for BSE.
The EU requires BSE testing for all risk animals above 24 months, while
routine testing of
healthy appearing animals is only required for cattle above 30 months.
There is an ongoing
discussion in Germany to move the testing age from 24 to 30 months. The
proponents
argue that so far only one BSE case was confirmed in animals younger
than 30 months at
slaughter. This case was detected in January of 2001, and occurred in an
animal that was
born before the ban on meat- and bonemeal (MBM) in animal feed went into
effect in
December 2000. Theoretically from June 2003 onwards all animals
slaughtered at 30
months or younger should not have had contact with feed containing MBM.
The German
Ministry of Consumer Protection, Food, and Agriculture (BMVEL) in
general favors a change in
the obligatory testing age, however, BMVEL insists on an extra security
time margin. Based
on the accumulated surveillance data, the German federal agency for risk
assessment
(Bundesinstitut fuer Risikobewertung, BfR) is expected to carry out a
BSE risk assessment in
April 2005. We therefore expect the change will go into effect in the
second half of 2005.
Table 2: BSE tests and results from January through December 2004
January - December 2004
Animal Category
Number
of tests
Number
of
confirmed
BSE cases
Percent
cases per
tests in that
category*
Percent
cases of all
confirmed
cases**
Perished animals 224,332 23 0.010 35.4
Other risk animals 7,113 2 0.028 3.1
Animals showing clinical BSE symptoms 43 0 0.000 0.0
Animals appearing healthy at slaughter 2,248,750 35 0.002 53.8
Animals slaughtered as part of a BSE
eradication measure 1,311 2 0.153 3.1
Suspicious animals to be confirmed by a lab 1,924 3 0.156 4.6
Total 2,483,473 65 0.003 100
* calculated as “number of confirmed cases” divided by “number of tests”
in that category multiplied by 100
** calculated as “number of confirmed cases” in a category divided by
“total number of confirmed cases ” multiplied
by 100
Source: German Federal Ministry for Consumer Protection, Food and
Agriculture
Risk Management by the German Government
For a detailed outline of the German risk management system please refer
to report
GM1033.
GAIN Report - GM5006 Page 4 of 4
UNCLASSIFIED USDA Foreign Agricultural Service
Production
In CY 2003, Germany produced 1.224 million MT of beef. 180,000 MT of
beef were
imported, thereof 66,000 MT from outside the EU-25 (mainly Argentina and
Brazil) and
13,800 from new EU-member states (Poland and Hungary). Exports amounted
to 4,423,000
MT of which 83,000 MT were sent to destinations outside the EU-25
(mostly Russia) and
2,800 MT to Hungary, Malta and the Czech Republic. Note: All figures are
in carcass weight
equivalent.
Table 3: German production of beef
Year Slaughter number (in 1000 heads) Beef production (in 1000 metric tons)
1999 4,565 1,374
2000 4,285 1,304
2001 4,353 1,360
2002 4,272 1,317
2003 3,961 1,224
Source: German Federal Ministry for Consumer Protection, Food and
Agriculture
Consumption
Due to consumer concerns in relation to BSE, per capita consumption of
beef had dropped
from 10.4 kg in 1999 to 6.8 kg in 20011. In 2003 it had rebound to 8.8
kg. A further
increase is expected for 2004. However, due to the health related trend
away from meat
consumption, it is expected that the pre-BSE consumption levels will not
be reached again.
Related reports:
GM1033 11/27/2001 One year after the detection of BSE in Germany
GM3006 02/27/2003 German Cattle Identification and Beef Labeling
1 In 2000, per capita consumption was recorded at 9.6 kg. However, as
BSE was detected in
November of 2000 November, this year cannot serve as comparison.

http://www.agobservatory.org/library.cfm?refID=46640


> Report Highlights:
> In 2004, 65 cases of BSE were confirmed in Germany, compared to 54 in
> 2003, and 106 in
> 2002. Until January 19, 2005, one additional case was confirmed,
> taking the number of
> confirmed BSE cases since the first detection of BSE in Germany in
> November 2000, to a
> total of 358. In Germany all cattle older than 24 month at slaughter
> have to be tested for
> BSE, compared to 30 months in the EU. The ongoing discussion about
> testing age will likely
> result in a change to 30 months in the second half of 2005.


seems GWs BSE MRR policy is like a disease in itself, and spreading.

would seem logical that the testing age for cattle/TSE would be the
age of earliest detection.

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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