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From: TSS ()
Subject: CSU guidelines re: CWD
Date: April 15, 2005 at 8:23 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: CSU guidelines re: CWD
Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2005 23:43:08 -0600
From: "Jim Woodward"
To: "Bob Ellis"


Dear Dr. Ellis,

Below are CSU's guidelines for researchers and diagnostic laboratories
working with the chronic wasting disease agent. SECTION IV-VIABILITY
discusses the agent's resistance to common methods of disinfection and
inactivation. SECTION VII-RECOMMENDED PRECAUTIONS notes the
requirement for biosafety level 2 practices, containment equipment and
facilities when working with CWD. SECTION VIII-HANDLING INFORMATION
requires that the CWD agent be decontaminated before disposal, and
that storage of the agent must be in sealed containers that are
appropriately labeled.

Many of the studies conducted at the Foothills Wildlife Research
Facility involve in vivo propagation of the CWD pathogen in cervids
held in open dirt pens. Open dirt pens do not conform to BSL-2
guidelines. Furthermore, no attempts are being made to decontaminate
or contain feces and other CWD-contaminated wastes. Rather, these
materials are being collected and dumped in piles within the facility.

I understand you have been instructed to not respond to my inquiries
regarding this matter. Wouldn't it be prudent, however, to take a
closer look at this situation?

Sincerely,

Jim Woodward

COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
Agent and Material Safety Information Manual
November 2001

Information obtained from Office of Biosafety Material Safety Data
Sheets- Health Canada, Health Protection Branch, Laboratory Centre for
Disease Control.
(www.hc-sc.gc.ca/main/lcdc/web/bmb/msds/index.html)

Edited by the Colorado State University Office of Biosafety- December
21, 1998.

The information, opinions and recommendations contained in these
Biohazard Material Safety Data Sheets are compiled from sources
believed to be reliable. The Colorado State University Office of
Biosafety accepts no responsibility for the accuracy, sufficiency,
reliability or for any loss or injury resulting from the use of this
information. Newly discovered hazards are frequent and this
information may not be completely up to date. These MSDSs will be
revised as additional, updated information becomes available. We would
welcome relevant input from individuals who utilize this handbook and
have questions and/or additions to the handbook database.

Direct comments to Dr. Robert Ellis, Colorado State University
Biosafety Officer
(970)491-6729, Fax - (970)491-4804,
E-mail - rellis@cvmbs.colostate.edu


SECTION I - INFECTIOUS AGENT

NAME: Scrapie agent (may be applied to Chronic Wasting Disease)

SYNONYM OR CROSS REFERENCE: Spongiform encephalopathy, Chronic
infectious neuropathic agent (CHINA).

CHARACTERISTICS: Filterable, self-replicating, slow infectious
pathogen; proteinaceous infectious particles ("prion").

SECTION II - HEALTH HAZARD

PATHOGENICITY: Chronic, fatal ataxia of deer, elk, sheep and
occasionally goats; associated with BSE of cows in United Kingdom.

EPIDEMIOLOGY: Widespread distribution in Europe, Asia and America.

HOST RANGE: Wild ruminants (Chronic Wasting Disease); sheep, goats
(Scrapie); transmissible to mice, monkeys and cattle.

INFECTIOUS DOSE: Unknown; 40,000 fold greater efficiency of
establishing experimental infection in mice by intracerebral
inoculation, compared with the oral route.

MODE OF TRANSMISSION: Transmitted from ewes to lambs, placenta is
infectious; may spread laterally from naturally infected to uninfected
animals; no evidence of transmission to occupationally exposed humans
involving trauma with scrapie tissues or from consumption of scrapie
infected sheep; no evidence for transmission of chronic wasting
disease from wild ruminants to humans; transmission to cows in UK
through addition of sheep offal to feed; practice has ceased however,
consumption of infected meat by humans has been associated with
characteristic disease.

INCUBATION PERIOD: Up to 1 year.

COMMUNICABILITY: No current evidence of transmission to humans.

SECTION III - DISSEMINATION

RESERVOIR: Infected sheep, goats (Scrapie); Infected elk, deer
(Chronic Wasting Disease)

ZOONOSIS: No evidence to support hypothesis that consumption of
scrapie infected sheep might result in encephalopathy in humans;
ingestion of scrapie contaminated food by cattle and resultant Bovine
Spongiforin encephalopathy (BSE) may represent potential for
transmission to humans.

VECTORS: None

SECTION IV - VIABILITY

DRUG SUSCEPTIBILITY: N/A

SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DISINFECTANTS: Resistance to commonly used
disinfectants is well recognized formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, ethanol
and iodine. Chlorine has been reported to be only partially effective.
Disinfection should be carried out using IN sodium hydroxide at room
temperature for 1 hour or >3M GdnHCI at 55o C for 25 min.

PHYSICAL INACTIVATION: Resistant to UV and ionizing radiation,
ultrasonication, nucleases, boiling, heat. Autoclaving for I hour at
132o C is recommended for effective inactivation.

SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: Survives well outside of host.

SECTION V - MEDICAL

SURVEILLANCE: Sheep or wild ruminants - monitor for clinical signs -
diagnosis based on histopathological findings, transmission to animals
from biopsy specimens.

FIRST AID/TREATMENT: No specific treatment.

IMMUNIZATION: None

PROPHYLAXIS: None

SECTION VI - LABORATORY HAZARDS

LABORATORY-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS: No cases of infections with spongiform
encephalopathies in occupationally exposed persons (biologists,
hunters, lab workers, butchers, shepherds, abattoir workers,).

SOURCES/SPECIMENS: Infected animals and tissues - brain, CNS,
placenta.

PRIMARY HAZARDS: Accidental parenteral inoculation; risk from
aerosols, droplets, and exposure of intact skin, gastric and mucous
membranes is not known.

SPECIAL HAZARDS: None

SECTION VII - RECOMMENDED PRECAUTIONS

CONT NT REQUIREMENTS: Biosafety level 2 practices, containment
equipment and facilities when working with this agent.

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Laboratory coat; gloves when contact with
infectious materials is unavoidable.

OTHER PRECAUTIONS: None

SECTION VIII - HANDLING INFORMATION

SPILLS: Allow aerosols to settle; wearing protective clothing, gently
cover spill with paper towel and apply IN sodium hydroxide, starting
at perimeter and working towards the center- allow sufficient contact
time (1 hour) before clean up.

DISPOSAL: Decontaminate before disposal; steam sterilization at 132o C
for 1 hour, disinfection with sodium hydroxide, incineration.

STORAGE: In sealed containers that are appropriately labeled.

Date prepared: October 11, 1997 Prepared by: Canadian Office of
Biosafety.
Information edited by the Colorado State University Office of
Biosafety; June 16, 1998.

http://www.colostate.edu/depts/lar/ams_info/scrapie.html

TSS



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