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From: TSS ()
Subject: Infected deer might be result of additives
Date: April 8, 2005 at 1:42 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Infected deer might be result of additives
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 07:55:41 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Infected deer might be result of additives

OUTDOORS COLUMN

As you all probably know by now, there were two cases of chronic wasting
disease (CWD) in whitetail deer in Oneida County recently. These are the
first reported cases of this disease in New York State. The animals
affected were not wild but farm-raised, penned animals.

CWD is a transmissible disease that affects the brain and central
nervous system in certain deer and elk. There is no evidence that CWD is
linked to any disease in humans or domestic livestock, but the
characteristics of the disease are similar to that of mad cow disease.

Since this disease is transmitted through direct contact, how did these
penned animals in Oneida County get infected? The opinion of some
biologists and scientists is the addition of animal protein in the
commercial feed consumed by the animals.

Advertisement

Letís face it, deer and cattle are not designed to eat animal
biproducts. These animals are browsers and grazers, not meat-eaters.
They have no top teeth or canines in the front of their mouths.

By supplementing feeds with additional protein (ie. rendered animal
meat, fat and bone marrow) to enhance antler growth, etc., these deer
may have been contaminated. So now, it must be contained to ensure that
other whitetail deer will not be affected and spread the disease.

A five-to-10 mile circle will be drawn around the contaminated area and
every deer in that area ó an estimated 400 ó will be destroyed. This
same practice was done in Wisconsin a few years ago and was very successful.

If anyone is interested, the DEC and the Department of Agriculture and
Markets will have a public informational meeting at 1 p.m. Saturday the
Westmoreland Middle School, which is on Route 233 between Utica and Rome.

Changes and Additions


ē The second annual Youth Turkey Hunting Opportunity will be held April
23-24. Hunters ages 12-15 can use this early chance to get a turkey.
Youths must be accompanied by a properly licensed adult, and only one
turkey can be taken at this time. The other turkey tag cannot be used
until May 1.

ē A few weeks ago, I told you about the new proposals for this yearís
deer season. The early, primitive muzzle-loader season has been scrapped
for this year. However, there was too much public opposition to continue
with this plan at this time.

Many of the seasons will have Saturday openings that will hopefully
increase hunting opportunities for younger and older hunters. Those who
canít get the day off for a Monday opener will be able to get out on the
weekend.

ē Iím excited about the pilot program for two management units located
primarily in Ulster County (WMUís 3C and 3J). Bucks harvested in those
areas will have a three-point antler restriction. At least one antler on
the buck must have three points to be legal. Hunters under the age of 17
will be exempt from this requirement.

I think that weíll see an expansion of the age structure of the bucks in
that area over the next couple years, making the deer hunting far
better. Hopefully it will be extended to other parts of the state soon.

Whatís happening?


A Hunter Education Course will be held from 6-9 p.m. April 22 and at 10
a.m. April 23 at Woodland Outfitters in West Oneonta. Call 432-8533 to
pre-register.

Rick Brockway writes a weekly outdoors column for The Daily Star. E-mail
him at brockway@dmcom.net.

http://www.thedailystar.com/sports/2005/04/08/spout.html

TSS

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: DOCKET-- 03D-0186 -- FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Use of
Material From Deer and Elk in Animal Feed; Availability
Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 11:47:37 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov

Greetings FDA,

i would kindly like to comment on;

Docket 03D-0186

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Use of Material From Deer and Elk in Animal
Feed; Availability

Several factors on this apparent voluntary proposal disturbs me greatly,
please allow me to point them out;

1. MY first point is the failure of the partial ruminant-to-ruminant feed
ban of 8/4/97. this partial and voluntary feed ban of some ruminant
materials being fed back to cattle is terribly flawed. without the
_total_ and _mandatory_ ban of all ruminant materials being fed
back to ruminants including cattle, sheep, goat, deer, elk and mink,
chickens, fish (all farmed animals for human/animal consumption),
this half ass measure will fail terribly, as in the past decades...

2. WHAT about sub-clinical TSE in deer and elk? with the recent
findings of deer fawns being infected with CWD, how many could
possibly be sub-clinically infected. until we have a rapid TSE test to
assure us that all deer/elk are free of disease (clinical and sub-clinical),
we must ban not only documented CWD infected deer/elk, but healthy
ones as well. it this is not done, they system will fail...

3. WE must ban not only CNS (SRMs specified risk materials),
but ALL tissues. recent new and old findings support infectivity
in the rump or ass muscle. wether it be low or high, accumulation
will play a crucial role in TSEs.

4. THERE are and have been for some time many TSEs in the
USA. TME in mink, Scrapie in Sheep and Goats, and unidentified
TSE in USA cattle. all this has been proven, but the TSE in USA
cattle has been totally ignored for decades. i will document this
data below in my references.

5. UNTIL we ban all ruminant by-products from being fed back
to ALL ruminants, until we rapid TSE test (not only deer/elk) but
cattle in sufficient numbers to find (1 million rapid TSE test in
USA cattle annually for 5 years), any partial measures such as the
ones proposed while ignoring sub-clinical TSEs and not rapid TSE
testing cattle, not closing down feed mills that continue to violate the
FDA's BSE feed regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) and not making
freely available those violations, will only continue to spread these
TSE mad cow agents in the USA. I am curious what we will
call a phenotype in a species that is mixed with who knows
how many strains of scrapie, who knows what strain or how many
strains of TSE in USA cattle, and the CWD in deer and elk (no
telling how many strains there), but all of this has been rendered
for animal feeds in the USA for decades. it will get interesting once
someone starts looking in all species, including humans here in the
USA, but this has yet to happen...

6. IT is paramount that CJD be made reportable in every state
(especially ''sporadic'' cjd), and that a CJD Questionnaire must
be issued to every family of a victim of TSE. only checking death
certificates will not be sufficient. this has been proven as well
(see below HISTORY OF CJD -- CJD QUESTIONNAIRE)

7. WE must learn from our past mistakes, not continue to make
the same mistakes...

REFERENCES

Six white-tailed deer fawns test positive for CWD

MADISON -- Six fawns in the area of south central Wisconsin where
chronic wasting disease has been found in white-tailed deer have tested
positive for the disease, according to Department of Natural Resources
wildlife health officials. These are the youngest wild white-tailed deer
detected with chronic wasting disease (CWD) to date.

Approximately 4,200 fawns, defined as deer under 1 year of age, were
sampled from the eradication zone over the last year. The majority of
fawns sampled were between the ages of 5 to 9 months, though some were
as young as 1 month. Two of the six fawns with CWD detected were 5 to 6
months old. All six of the positive fawns were taken from the core area
of the CWD eradication zone where the highest numbers of positive deer
have been identified.

snip...

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/news/on/2003/on20030513.htm#art4

===================================================

Issued: Monday, 28 August 2000
NEW EVIDENCE OF SUB-CLINICAL PRION INFECTION: IMPORTANT RESEARCH
FINDINGS RELEVANT TO CJD AND BSE

A team of researchers led by Professor John Collinge at the Medical
Research Council Prion Unit1 report today in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences, on new evidence for the existence of a
'sub-clinical' form of BSE in mice which was unknown until now.

The scientists took a closer look at what is known as the 'species
barrier' - the main protective factor which limits the ability of
prions2 to jump from one species to infect another. They found the mice
had a 'sub-clinical' form of disease where they carried high levels of
infectivity but did not develop the clinical disease during their normal
lifespan. The idea that individuals can carry a disease and show no
clinical symptoms is not new. It is commonly seen in conventional
infectious diseases.

Researchers tried to infect laboratory mice with hamster prions3 called
Sc237 and found that the mice showed no apparent signs of disease.
However, on closer inspection they found that the mice had high levels
of mouse prions in their brains. This was surprising because it has
always been assumed that hamster prions could not cause the disease in
mice, even when injected directly into the brain.

In addition the researchers showed that this new sub-clinical infection
could be easily passed on when injected into healthy mice and hamsters.

The height of the species barrier varies widely between different
combinations of animals and also varies with the type or strain of
prions. While some barriers are quite small (for instance BSE easily
infects mice), other combinations of strain and species show a seemingly
impenetrable barrier. Traditionally, the particular barrier studied here
was assumed to be robust.

Professor John Collinge said: "These results have a number of important
implications. They suggest that we should re-think how we measure
species barriers in the laboratory, and that we should not assume that
just because one species appears resistant to a strain of prions they
have been exposed to, that they do not silently carry the infection.
This research raises the possibility, which has been mentioned before,
that apparently healthy cattle could harbour, but never show signs of, BSE.

"This is a timely and unexpected result, increasing what we know about
prion disease. These new findings have important implications for those
researching prion disease, those responsible for preventing infected
material getting into the food chain and for those considering how best
to safeguard health and reduce the risk that theoretically, prion
disease could be contracted through medical and surgical procedures."

ISSUED FRIDAY 25 AUGUST UNDER EMBARGO. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE EMBARGO IS
SET BY THE JOURNAL.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE MRC PRESS OFFICE ON 020 7637 6011
(OFFICE HOURS) OR 07818 428297 OR 0385 774357 (OUT-OF-OFFICE-HOURS) OR
PROFESSOR JOHN COLLINGE ON 020 7594 3760. PLEASE NOTE THAT OWING TO
TRAVEL COMMITMENTS PROFESSOR COLLINGE WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE UNTIL 16.30
ON FRIDAY 25 AUGUST AND CONTACTABLE AGAIN ON MONDAY 28 AUGUST VIA THE
MRC PRESS OFFICE. DR ANDREW HILL (A CO-AUTHOR ON THE PAPER) FROM THE
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE WILL BE AVAILABLE
ON 00 61 3 8344 3995 (DURING OFFICE HOURS) OR 00 61 3 9443 0009
(OUT-OF-OFFICE HOURS). PLEASE NOTE THAT AUSTRALIA IS TEN HOURS AHEAD OF
UK TIME.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

Professor Collinge is a consultant neurologist and Director of the newly
formed MRC Prion Unit based at The Imperial College School of Medicine
at St Mary's Hospital. He is also a member of the UK Government's
Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC). The MRC prion unit
is was set up in 1999, and its work includes molecular genetic studies
of human prion disease and transgenic modelling of human prion diseases.

Prions are unique infectious agents that cause fatal brain diseases such
as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie and BSE (mad
cow disease) in animals. In some circumstances prions from one species
of animals can infect another and it is clear that BSE has done this to
cause the disease variant CJD in the UK and France. It remains unclear
how large an epidemic of variant CJD will occur over the years ahead.

The strain of prion used here to infect the mice is the Sc237 strain
(also known as 263K) which infects hamsters, and until now was assumed
not to infect mice.

This research was funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a national organisation funded by
the UK tax-payer. Its business is medical research aimed at improving
human health; everyone stands to benefit from the outputs. The research
it supports and the scientists it trains meet the needs of the health
services, the pharmaceutical and other health-related industries and the
academic world. MRC has funded work which has led to some of the most
significant discoveries and achievements in medicine in the UK. About
half of the MRC's expenditure of £345 million is invested in over 50 of
its Institutes and Units, where it employs its own research staff. The
remaining half goes in the form of grant support and training awards to
individuals and teams in universities and medical schools.

The Wellcome Trust is the world's largest medical research charity with
a spend of some £600 million in the current financial year 1999/2000.
The Wellcome Trust supports more than 5,000 researchers, at 400
locations, in 42 different countries to promote and foster research with
the aim of improving human and animal health. As well as funding major
initiatives in the public understanding of science, the Wellcome Trust
is the country's leading supporter of research into the history of medicine.

©2002 Medical Research Council
Data Protection policy | Contact the MRC

http://www.mrc.ac.uk/index/public_interest/public-press_office/public-press_releases_2000/public-mrc-43-00.htm

======================================

Oral transmission and early lymphoid tropism of chronic wasting disease
PrPres in mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus )
Christina J. Sigurdson1, Elizabeth S. Williams2, Michael W. Miller3,
Terry R. Spraker1,4, Katherine I. O'Rourke5 and Edward A. Hoover1

Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical
Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523- 1671, USA1
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, 1174 Snowy
Range Road, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82070, USA 2
Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wildlife Research Center, 317 West
Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO 80526-2097, USA3
Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, 300 West
Drake Road, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1671, USA4
Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, US
Department of Agriculture, 337 Bustad Hall, Washington State University,
Pullman, WA 99164-7030, USA5

Author for correspondence: Edward Hoover.Fax +1 970 491 0523. e-mail
ehoover@lamar.colostate.edu

Mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus) were inoculated orally with a
brain homogenate prepared from mule deer with naturally occurring
chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion-induced transmissible spongiform
encephalopathy. Fawns were necropsied and examined for PrP res, the
abnormal prion protein isoform, at 10, 42, 53, 77, 78 and 80 days
post-inoculation (p.i.) using an immunohistochemistry assay modified to
enhance sensitivity. PrPres was detected in alimentary-tract-associated
lymphoid tissues (one or more of the following: retropharyngeal lymph
node, tonsil, Peyer's patch and ileocaecal lymph node) as early as 42
days p.i. and in all fawns examined thereafter (53 to 80 days p.i.). No
PrPres staining was detected in lymphoid tissue of three control fawns
receiving a control brain inoculum, nor was PrPres detectable in neural
tissue of any fawn. PrPres-specific staining was markedly enhanced by
sequential tissue treatment with formic acid, proteinase K and hydrated
autoclaving prior to immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal
antibody F89/160.1.5. These results indicate that CWD PrP res can be
detected in lymphoid tissues draining the alimentary tract within a few
weeks after oral exposure to infectious prions and may reflect the
initial pathway of CWD infection in deer. The rapid infection of deer
fawns following exposure by the most plausible natural route is
consistent with the efficient horizontal transmission of CWD in nature
and enables accelerated studies of transmission and pathogenesis in the
native species.

snip...

These results indicate that mule deer fawns develop detectable PrP res
after oral exposure to an inoculum containing CWD prions. In the
earliest post-exposure period, CWD PrPres was traced to the lymphoid
tissues draining the oral and intestinal mucosa (i.e. the
retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsil, ileal Peyer's patches and
ileocaecal lymph nodes), which probably received the highest initial
exposure to the inoculum. Hadlow et al. (1982) demonstrated scrapie
agent in the tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, ileum
and spleen in a 10-month-old naturally infected lamb by mouse bioassay.
Eight of nine sheep had infectivity in the retropharyngeal lymph node.
He concluded that the tissue distribution suggested primary infection
via the gastrointestinal tract. The tissue distribution of PrPres in the
early stages of infection in the fawns is strikingly similar to that
seen in naturally infected sheep with scrapie. These findings support
oral exposure as a natural route of CWD infection in deer and support
oral inoculation as a reasonable exposure route for experimental studies
of CWD.

snip...

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/80/10/2757
===================================

now, just what is in that deer feed? _ANIMAL PROTEIN_

Subject: MAD DEER/ELK DISEASE AND POTENTIAL SOURCES
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 18:41:46 -0700
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: BSE-L
To: BSE-L

8420-20.5% Antler Developer
For Deer and Game in the wild
Guaranteed Analysis Ingredients / Products Feeding Directions

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.surefed.com/deer.htm

BODE'S GAME FEED SUPPLEMENT #400
A RATION FOR DEER
NET WEIGHT 50 POUNDS
22.6 KG.

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod7.htm

Ingredients

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain By-Products,
Forage Products, Roughage Products 15%, Molasses Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Pyosphate, Salt,
Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Acetate with D-activated Animal Sterol
(source of Vitamin D3), Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement,
Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Panothenate, Choline
Chloride, Folic Acid, Menadione Soduim Bisulfite Complex, Pyridoxine
Hydorchloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, d-Biotin, Manganous Oxide, Zinc
Oxide, Ferrous Carbonate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Dried
Sacchoromyces Berevisiae Fermentation Solubles, Cellulose gum,
Artificial Flavors added.

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod6.htm
===================================

MORE ANIMAL PROTEIN PRODUCTS FOR DEER

Bode's #1 Game Pellets
A RATION FOR DEER
F3153

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
Crude Protein (Min) 16%
Crude Fat (Min) 2.0%
Crude Fiber (Max) 19%
Calcium (Ca) (Min) 1.25%
Calcium (Ca) (Max) 1.75%
Phosphorus (P) (Min) 1.0%
Salt (Min) .30%
Salt (Max) .70%


Ingredients

Grain Products, Plant Protein Products, Processed Grain By-Products,
Forage Products, Roughage Products, 15% Molasses Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt,
Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Acetate with D-activated Animal Sterol
(source of Vitamin D3) Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement,
Roboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline
Chloride, Folic Acid, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex, Pyridoxine
Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, e - Biotin, Manganous Oxide, Zinc
Oxide, Ferrous Carbonate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Dried
Saccharyomyces Cerevisiae Fermentation Solubles, Cellulose gum,
Artificial Flavors added.

FEEDING DIRECTIONS
Feed as Creep Feed with Normal Diet

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod8.htm

INGREDIENTS

Grain Products, Roughage Products (not more than 35%), Processed Grain
By-Products, Plant Protein Products, Forage Products,
__Animal Protein Products__,
L-Lysine, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Monocalcium/Dicalcium
Phosphate, Yeast Culture, Magnesium Oxide, Cobalt Carbonate, Basic
Copper Chloride, Manganese Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Sodium Selenite,
Zinc Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Sodium Selenite, Potassium Iodide,
Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A
Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Mineral Oil, Mold Inhibitor, Calcium
Lignin Sulfonate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite
Complex, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic Acid,
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Mineral Oil, Chromium Tripicolinate

DIRECTIONS FOR USE

Deer Builder Pellets is designed to be fed to deer under range
conditions or deer that require higher levels of protein. Feed to deer
during gestation, fawning, lactation, antler growth and pre-rut, all
phases which require a higher level of nutrition. Provide adequate
amounts of good quality roughage and fresh water at all times.

http://www.profilenutrition.com/Products/Specialty/deer_builder_pellets.html
===================================================

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

April 9, 2001 WARNING LETTER

01-PHI-12
CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Brian J. Raymond, Owner
Sandy Lake Mills
26 Mill Street
P.O. Box 117
Sandy Lake, PA 16145
PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT

Tel: 215-597-4390

Dear Mr. Raymond:

Food and Drug Administration Investigator Gregory E. Beichner conducted
an inspection of your animal feed manufacturing operation, located in
Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, on March 23,
2001, and determined that your firm manufactures animal feeds including
feeds containing prohibited materials. The inspection found significant
deviations from the requirements set forth in
Title 21, code of Federal Regulations, part 589.2000 - Animal Proteins
Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to prevent the
establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE) . Such deviations cause products being manufactured at this
facility to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(f), of the
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic
Act (the Act).

Our investigation found failure to label your
swine feed with the required cautionary statement "Do Not Feed to cattle
or other Ruminants" The FDA suggests that the statement be
distinguished
by different type-size or color or other means of highlighting the
statement so that it is easily noticed by a purchaser.

In addition, we note that you are using approximately 140 pounds of
cracked corn to flush your mixer used in the manufacture of animal
feeds containing prohibited material. This
flushed material is fed to wild game including deer, a ruminant animal.
Feed material which may potentially contain prohibited material should
not be fed to ruminant animals which may become part of the food chain.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deviations from
the regulations. As a manufacturer of materials intended for animal
feed use, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation
and the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with
the law. We have enclosed a copy of FDA's Small Entity Compliance Guide
to assist you with complying with the regulation... blah, blah, blah...

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g1115d.pdf
==================================

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: ON THE ORIGIN OF MINK TME MARSH/HANSON (Scrapie in USA sheep,
to TSE in USA cattle, or BOTH)
Date: Thu, 15 May 2003 15:23:46 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@uni-karlsruhe.de

######## Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #########

ABSTRACT--studies on mink susceptibility to sources of scrapie
from the United States, but not from the United Kingdom, indicate that
transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) most likely originates from
mink fed scrapie-infected sheep or goat tissues.
Experiments further suggest that the shortest natural route of infection is
via bite wounds inflicted by littermates rather than by the oral route
per se.
Other studies, on the biologic characterization of TME agent from Sawyer
County, Wisconsin, indicate that this particular source of TME is composed
of a mixture of subpopulations which include a hamster pathogen and a
mink-monkey pathogen...

snip...

with so many disease features in common, it would seem a simple matter
to demonstrate that TME results from feeding scrapie-infected tissue to
mink.
BUT such has not been the case. Epizootiologic studies of the 14 worldwide
occurrences of TME have revealed probably exposure to scrapie in only one
instance, a 1965 incidence in Finland in which the affected farm was the
only
one in the area feeding sheep heads (Kangas, personal communication).
Experimentally, mink have been found to be susceptible to some sources of
scrapie and the disease produces was indistinguishable from TME (6)...

snip...

The purpose of these present studies was to attempt to explain differences
between field and experimental observations, and to further characterize
the
biologic properties of the Sawyer County, Wisconsin, isolate of TME.
Our results indicate that mink are more susceptible to sources of scrapie
present in the UNITED STATES that those found in the UK, and that
BITE WOUNDS from littermates may represent a significant route of
natural exposure...

snip...

This Nubian X Toggenburg buck was naturally infected via exposure to
scrapie-contaminated pasture at Mission, TEXAS; the pasture being
previously occupied by a flock of scrapie-affected Suffolk sheep. At 6
months
of age, animal B-834 was removed from exposure and placed in a pen where
he subsequently developed signs of scrapie at 40 months of age...

snip...

Therefore, it should be expected that the pathology of natural TME will vary
depending on the source of scrapie to which mink are exposed.
Johannsen and Hartung have reported an incidence of TME occuring
in East Germany in 1967 in which affected mink had diffuse cerebral
''edema'' and widespread lesions in the spinal cord (10)...

snip...

Even though B-834 produced short incubation periods when inoculated
intracerebrally, exposure by the oral route was ineffective during an
observation period of two years. Thus, we once again seem to have a
conflict between field and experimental data. However, Gajdusek
has suggested that the main route of entry for these transmissible agents
is not the oral route per se, but rather via breaks or abrasions of skin and
mucosal surfaces (11).

full text;

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m08/tab016.pdf

SNIP...END...TSS


######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########





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