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From: TSS ()
Subject: Japan Panel Recommends Easing Beef Import Regulations based on more lies from USDA (WSJ)
Date: March 28, 2005 at 6:15 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Japan Panel Recommends Easing Beef Import Regulations based on more lies from USDA WSJ
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2005 08:18:10 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Japan Panel Recommends Easing Beef Import Regulations


DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
March 28, 2005 4:50 a.m.

TOKYO -- Japan's food safety board Monday recommended easing the
country's rules on the testing of beef imports for mad cow disease,
partly paving the way for the resumption of U.S. beef imports to Japan.

A subcommittee of Japan's Food Safety Commission Monday approved a
policy change proposed by the government late last year to waive tests
for cattle aged 20 months or younger. The Food Safety Commission, an
independent government-appointed body, has the final say on the safety
of beef imports.

Subcommittee members repeated that such young cattle have an extremely
small chance of becoming infected with the brain-wasting disease
formally known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE .

Monday's decision came amid mounting calls from Washington that Tokyo
partially lift its 15-month ban on all U.S. beef imports to allow beef
from young U.S. cattle to re-enter the Japanese market.

Waiving tests for the young cattle was a proposal made by the United
States on the basis of scientific evidence indicating that the proteins
associated with mad cow disease do not accumulate in cows so young.

Although the subcommittee has approved of a change in policy, it's
likely to take some time before Japan can resume U.S. beef imports.

After receiving the recommendations from the subcommittee, the Food
Safety Commission will hold public hearings to listen to opinions from
consumers.

The commission will then present its proposals on revising the food
safety standards to relevant Japanese ministries, including the
agriculture and health departments, probably around the end of April.

Since December 2003, when the first case of mad cow disease was
confirmed on U.S. soil, the Japanese government has blocked all beef
imports from the country.

Excluding young cattle from the testing would therefore mean a partial
resumption of U.S. imports.

Tokyo, since 2001, has been checking every cow slaughtered in Japan
before it enters the food supply, following the nation's discovery of
its first case of mad cow disease.

Easing the rules would also be in line with an agreement made in October
between the U.S. and Japanese governments that Tokyo would allow
shipments of beef from young U.S. cattle once technical details were
worked out.

Despite pressure from visiting U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
earlier this month, Tokyo refused to set a timeframe for the resumption
of U.S. beef imports, repeating that it's top priority was food safety.

Before the ban, Japan was the most lucrative overseas market for U.S.
beef producers, buying $1.7 billion in beef in 2003.

-By Takashi Nakamichi, Dow Jones Newswires; 813-5255-2929;
takashi.nakamichi@dowjones.com

-Edited by Kirsty Mackenzie

WSJ.COM/

> Waiving tests for the young cattle was a proposal made by the United
> States on the basis of scientific evidence indicating that the
> proteins associated with mad cow disease do not accumulate in cows so
> young.
>

THIS is simply NOT TRUE !


Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA

snip...

the myth that cattle under 30 months of age are free from BSE/TSE is
just that, a myth,
and it's a false myth !

the youngest age of BSE case to date is 20 months old; As at: 31 May
2003 Year of onset Age youngest case (mnths) Age 2nd youngest case
(mnths) Age 2nd oldest case (yrs.mnths) Age oldest case (yrs.mnths) 1986
30 33 5.03 5.07 1987 30 31 9.09 10.00 1988 24 27 10.02 11.01(2) 1989 21
24(4) 12.00(2) 15.04 1990 24(2) 26 13.03 14.00 1991 24 26(3) 14.02 17.05
1992 20 26 15.02 16.02 1993 29 30(3) 14.10 18.10 1994 30(2) 31(2) 14.05
16.07 1995 24 32 14.09 15.05 1996 29 30 15.07 17.02 1997 37(7) 38(3)
14.09 15.01 1998 34 36 14.07 15.05 1999 39(2) 41 13.07 13.10 2000 40 42
17.08 19.09 2001 48(2) 56 14.10 14.11 2002 51 52 15.08 15.09(2) 2003 50
62 11.11 14.11

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/bse-statistics/bse/yng-old.html

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/index.html

The implications of the Swiss result for Britain, which has had the most
BSE, are complex. Only cattle aged 30 months or younger are eaten in
Britain, on the assumption, based on feeding trials, that cattle of that
age, even if they were infected as calves, have not yet accumulated
enough prions to be infectious. But the youngest cow to develop BSE on
record in Britain was 20 months old, showing some are fast incubators.
Models predict that 200-300 cattle under 30 months per year are infected
with BSE and enter the food chain currently in Britain. Of these 3-5
could be fast incubators and carrying detectable quantities of prion.

http://www.sare.org/htdocs/hypermail/html-home/28-html/0359.html


snip...


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed


Docket No, 04-047-l Regulatory Identification No. (RIN)
091O-AF46 NEW BSE SAFEGUARDS (comment submission)


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/0/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08d?OpenDocument

Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From Use in

Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed

Comment Number: EC -10

Accepted - Volume 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html

PART 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html

PDF]Freas, William TSS SUBMISSION

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat -

Page 1. J Freas, William From: Sent: To: Subject: Terry S. Singeltary

Sr. [flounder@wt.net] Monday, January 08,200l 3:03 PM freas ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3681s2_09.pdf

Asante/Collinge et al, that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine

genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable

from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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