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From: TSS ()
Subject: USA STRONG ARMS JAPAN AND FORCE FEEDS THEM GWs SUICIDAL BSE MRR POLICY (also known as the global trading of TSEs)
Date: March 11, 2005 at 8:17 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: USA STRONG ARMS JAPAN AND FORCE FEEDS THEM GWs SUICIDAL BSE MRR POLICY (also known as the global trading of TSEs)
Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2005 10:17:22 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy


Japan Near Relaxing Beef-Testing Standards For BSE - Govt


DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
March 11, 2005 3:46 a.m.

TOKYO (AP)--Food safety experts in Japan neared agreement Friday on
relaxing beef-testing standards for mad cow disease - a development
likely to help clear the way toward resuming U.S. beef imports after a
15-month-old ban.

Japan currently requires testing of all beef products for the fatal,
brain-wasting disease, and has barred U.S. beef imports that have not
undergone such tests.

The Food Safety Commission is considering whether to waive tests on
Japan-raised cattle age 20 months or younger. That would ease the way to
resume U.S. beef imports from cows of a similar age - a proposal made by
the United States and backed earlier this month by a Japanese government
panel, based on claims that younger cattle are considered less at risk.

"The discussion is moving forward, basically to accept (the revision),"
said Takahisa Murakami, a Cabinet Office official in charge of food safety.

Murakami said that commission members were discussing the wording of a
final statement to the Health and Welfare Ministry - but that some
disputed scientific details involving the risk evaluation method.

However, commission chairman Yasuhiro Yoshikawa said he hopes for a
conclusion at the next meeting, expected later this month, Kyodo News
agency reported.

Japan halted U.S. beef imports in December 2003 following the discovery
of the United States' first case of mad cow disease, formally known as
bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

Japan tentatively agreed in October to resume imports of beef products
from younger cows, but discussions stalled over how to confirm the
animals' ages.

Last month, a government panel recommended that Japan begin importing
U.S. grade A40 beef, which comes mostly from cattle 12-17 months old.

A final decision on imported beef safety also has to be approved by the
Food Safety Commission, then the agriculture and health ministries,
before the ban can be even partially lifted.

Murakami said it was hard to predict how long that may take.

Washington has recently stepped up pressure on Japan to allow U.S. beef
producers back into a market that was worth US$1.7 billion before the ban.

Lawmakers in the United States have warned of possible retaliatory
sanctions, and U.S. President George W. Bush telephoned Japanese Prime
Minister Junichiro Koizumi to personally ask him to expedite the process.

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is expected to apply more
pressure after she arrives in Tokyo next week on her Asia tour.

===========================================

US Trade Negotiator Warns Japan On Beef Situation - Kyodo


DOW JONES NEWSWIRES
March 10, 2005 11:20 p.m.

TOKYO -- A senior U.S. trade negotiator on Thursday called on Japan to
quickly lift its 15-month-old import ban on U.S. beef and warned that
the situation concerning the beef issue has become increasingly
"extremely tough" in the United States, especially in Congress, a
Japanese official said, Kyodo News reported from Washington.

Deputy U.S. Trade Representative Josette Shiner made the remarks to
Japanese Deputy Foreign Minister Mitoji Yabunaka during a regular
high-level bilateral consultation on regulatory reforms, which covered a
range of issues, including Japan's postal privatization plan, the
official said, according to Kyodo.

Shiner was apparently referring to growing political pressure in the
United States over the issue, with many lawmakers calling for economic
sanctions if Japan fails to quickly lift the ban imposed in December
2003, when the United States discovered its first - and so far only -
case of mad cow disease.

The disease is known formally as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE .

The official said Yabunaka explained the ongoing "scientific" procedures
taken in Japan toward resuming imports, maintaining Tokyo's position of
waiting to see the outcome of the deliberations by the Food Safety
Commission.

Shiner and Yabunaka discussed the beef issue based on the talks between
U.S. President George W. Bush and Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro
Koizumi by telephone Wednesday and with U.S. Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice's visit to Japan next week in mind, the official said.

Bush urged Koizumi to lift the ban, and the prime minister expressed
hope to resume imports at an early date without specifying a time frame.

At stake is whether Japan will accelerate the deliberations by the
independent commission of experts to pave the way for resuming imports
by Rice's visit.

The panel is studying whether to end the domestic blanket testing of
slaughtered cattle and exclude animals aged 20 months or younger to set
the stage for partially resuming imports under an earlier agreement.

Tokyo agreed with Washington last October to resume imports of beef from
animals up to 20 months old, backing down from its demand that the
United States adopt similar blanket testing on all slaughtered cattle
for export to Japan.

Fifty-nine House of Representatives members submitted a resolution last
week urging the USTR Office to "immediately" slap economic sanctions on
Japan for failing to resume imports despite the October agreement.

In Japan, the government is facing criticism about succumbing to such
external pressure and ending the blanket testing, while concerns prevail
among consumer groups.

As for regulation reforms, Shiner underlined the U.S. request for
creating a "level playing field" for competition between private sector
companies and two postal entities - life insurance and savings - to be
created under the privatization of Japan's postal services, the official
said.

The Japanese government plans to split Japan Post into four privatized
entities - mail delivery, savings, insurance and one for all kinds of
over-the-counter services - under a holding company in stages over a
10-year period starting April 2007.

Among many other issues, the U.S. side expressed concern over the rising
interconnection charges for fixed telephone lines operated by the
privatized Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp. (9432.TO), the official
said.

Shiner also called for easing regulations of corporate mergers involving
foreign entities, the official said.

Yabunaka underlined Japan's request for further extending the deadline
on Japan and other countries to issue passports with digitally coded
information and resuming visa renewal procedures for foreign nationals
within the United States.

The Japanese side also urged Washington again to repeal trade measures
the World Trade Organization has deemed to be in violation of its rules.

The measures include an antidumping law, known as the Byrd Amendment,
which allows antidumping duties collected by the U.S. government to be
shared with domestic industries to help offset damage from cheap imports.

The high-level talks, which culminated various working-level talks held
this week, followed up on reform requests mutually submitted last October.

The official said the two sides will begin drafting an annual report to
be submitted to the two leaders in July.

The two countries exchange reform recommendations every autumn and
compile an annual report under the Regulatory Reform and Competition
Policy Initiative launched by Koizumi and Bush in 2001 as a key
component of the Japan-U.S. Economic Partnership for Growth.

As for regulation reforms, Shiner underlined the U.S. request for
creating a "level playing field" for competition between private sector
companies and two postal entities - life insurance and savings - to be
created under the privatization of Japan's postal services, the official
said.

The Japanese government plans to split Japan Post into four privatized
entities - mail delivery, savings, insurance and one for all kinds of
over-the-counter services - under a holding company in stages over a
10-year period starting April 2007.

Among many other issues, the U.S. side expressed concern over the rising
interconnection charges for fixed telephone lines operated by the
privatized Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp. (9432.TO), the official
said.

Shiner also called for easing regulations of corporate mergers involving
foreign entities, the official said.

Yabunaka underlined Japan's request for further extending the deadline
on Japan and other countries to issue passports with digitally coded
information and resuming visa renewal procedures for foreign nationals
within the United States.

The Japanese side also urged Washington again to repeal trade measures
the World Trade Organization has deemed to be in violation of its rules.

The measures include an antidumping law, known as the Byrd Amendment,
which allows antidumping duties collected by the U.S. government to be
shared with domestic industries to help offset damage from cheap imports.

The high-level talks, which culminated various working-level talks held
this week, followed up on reform requests mutually submitted last October.


=================================

NOTHING LIKE FORCE FEEDING JAPAN NORTH AMERICAN
STRAINS OF MAD COW DISEASE. with those Texas mad
cows and the other 500+ UPI discovered that were very questionable,
all the ongoing ruminant feed ban violations, i just cannot believe the
Government of Japan is willing to expose there people to our agent,
under the lies the USDA continue to spread ;

''I would like to see that cow tracked down too.''

''USDA lied right to my face on that Monday''

''I find it hard to believe anything they say''

''IF you have conflicting results, you test again.''

''COMPLETELY off the record, I think that November cow was
a POSITIVE.''

this coming from the industry for goodness sake...TSS


EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)
Publication date: 20 August 2004

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

* 167 kB Report


* 105 kB Summary

Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working
Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission
(EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United
States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more
cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in
USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004
based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached
domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in
the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and
therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is
possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached
domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle
imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were
processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This
risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90’s when
domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the
low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with
continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or
pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no
significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains
extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently
increases.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html


Docket No, 04-047-l Regulatory Identification No. (RIN) 091O-AF46 NEW
BSE SAFEGUARDS (comment submission)

https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/0/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08d?OpenDocument

Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed


Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From Use in

Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed

Comment Number: EC -10

Accepted - Volume 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html

PART 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html

PDF]Freas, William TSS SUBMISSION

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat -

Page 1. J Freas, William From: Sent: To: Subject: Terry S. Singeltary

Sr. [flounder@wt.net] Monday, January 08,200l 3:03 PM freas ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3681s2_09.pdf

Asante/Collinge et al, that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine

genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable

from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm


TSS






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