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From: TSS ()
Subject: Woman treated for rare brain disorder CJD and yes, it could be from a strain of TSE in cattle, sheep, goat, deer and or elk
Date: February 25, 2005 at 9:12 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Woman treated for rare brain disorder
Date: Thu, 24 Feb 2005 09:56:40 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Woman treated for rare brain disorder


No link to mad cow disease, hospital officials say

BY WILLIAM MOYER
Press & Sun-Bulletin

JOHNSON CITY -- Physicians treating a female patient with a rapidly
deteriorating brain disorder confirmed Wednesday that the woman has a
rare and terminal malady, but said the illness is not linked to mad cow
disease.

Dr. Michael Chisdak, director of critical care for United Health
Services, emphasized repeatedly at a news conference that he is 99.9
percent certain the woman has classic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

Patients, staff and the community have "absolutely nothing to worry
about," Chisdak said, because the disease is not contagious.

Nor is public health jeopardized by the local case, UHS President and
CEO Matthew Salinger added.

Chisdak described the condition of the Southern Tier woman, who is in
her mid-60s, as "comfortable, not showing any distress," but said she is
unconscious in the intensive care unit at Wilson Memorial Regional
Medical Center in Johnson City. After the onset of CJD symptoms, the
disease is usually fatal. Chisdak described it as "Alzheimer's in
fast-forward."

Chisdak did not know how long the woman might survive. Federal law
prohibits hospital officials from identifying the woman.

Salinger said the diagnosis is a first for United Health Services
Hospitals, which runs Wilson and Binghamton General Hospital. CJD
affects roughly one in one million people, according to the National
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

"This is a very extraordinarily rare case," Salinger said.

UHS officials have alerted the state Health Department as required by
law, he said.

Dr. Rajesh Dave, vice president for medical affairs, said the woman's
family took her to Binghamton General on Jan. 29 with complaints of
restlessness, declining mental health and hallucinations.

The woman was admitted to the psychiatric unit, and her condition
continued to decline. A spinal tap on Feb. 8 was inconclusive; an EEG on
Feb. 10 showed abnormalities.

The next day, the woman was transferred to Wilson and underwent a series
of tests, including tests for Lyme disease, West Nile virus and Rocky
Mountain spotted fever. When physicians got the results late Tuesday of
a Feb. 17 brain biopsy, CJD was confirmed.

Chisdak said the biopsy showed the woman's brain was "generally shrunken
and full of holes," which are classic symptoms of CJD.

"The disorder begins with mental problems and progresses to complete
breakdown," said Chisdak, who saw four or five similar cases when he
worked at medical facilities in northern Pennsylvania and Cleveland.
"From there, motor functions begin to deteriorate. In a very rapid time,
the patient can succumb to infections."

http://www.pressconnects.com/today/news/stories/ne022405s150495.shtml

> No link to mad cow disease, hospital officials say


maybe not BSE, but what about BASE or another strain ???


TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########

Medical Sciences

Identification of a second bovine amyloidotic spongiform
encephalopathy: Molecular similarities with sporadic
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

Cristina Casalone *{dagger} , Gianluigi Zanusso {dagger} {ddagger} ,
Pierluigi Acutis *, Sergio Ferrari {ddagger} , Lorenzo Capucci § ,
Fabrizio Tagliavini ¶, Salvatore Monaco {ddagger} ||, and Maria Caramelli *

*Centro di Referenza Nazionale per le Encefalopatie Animali, Istituto
Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle d'Aosta, Via
Bologna, 148, 10195 Turin, Italy; {ddagger} Department of Neurological
and Visual Science, Section of Clinical Neurology, Policlinico G.B.
Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro, 10, 37134 Verona, Italy; § Istituto
Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia ed Emilia Romagna, Via
Bianchi, 9, 25124 Brescia, Italy; and ¶Istituto Nazionale Neurologico
"Carlo Besta," Via Celoria 11, 20133 Milan, Italy

Edited by Stanley B. Prusiner, University of California, San Francisco,
CA, and approved December 23, 2003 (received for review September 9, 2003)

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are
mammalian neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a
posttranslational conversion and brain accumulation of an insoluble,
protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion
protein (PrPC). Human and animal TSE agents exist as different
phenotypes that can be biochemically differentiated on the basis of the
molecular mass of the protease-resistant PrPSc fragments and the degree
of glycosylation. Epidemiological, molecular, and transmission studies
strongly suggest that the single strain of agent responsible for bovine
spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has infected humans, causing variant
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The unprecedented biological properties of
the BSE agent, which circumvents the so-called "species barrier" between
cattle and humans and adapts to different mammalian species, has raised
considerable concern for human health. To date, it is unknown whether
more than one strain might be responsible for cattle TSE or whether the
BSE agent undergoes phenotypic variation after natural transmission.
Here we provide evidence of a second cattle TSE. The disorder was
pathologically characterized by the presence of PrP-immunopositive
amyloid plaques, as opposed to the lack of amyloid deposition in typical
BSE cases, and by a different pattern of regional distribution and
topology of brain PrPSc accumulation. In addition, Western blot analysis
showed a PrPSc type with predominance of the low molecular mass
glycoform and a protease-resistant fragment of lower molecular mass than
BSE-PrPSc. Strikingly, the molecular signature of this previously
undescribed bovine PrPSc was similar to that encountered in a distinct
subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

{dagger} C.C. and G.Z. contributed equally to this work.

||To whom correspondence should be addressed.

E-mail: salvatore.monaco@mail.univr.it
.
www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0305777101

BSE prions propagate as either variant CJD-like or sporadic CJD-like
prion strains in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein

Emmanuel A. Asante, Jacqueline M. Linehan, Melanie Desbruslais, Susan Joiner, Ian Gowland, Andrew L. Wood, Julie Welch, Andrew F. Hill, Sarah E. Lloyd, Jonathan D.F. Wadsworth and John Collinge1

MRC Prion Unit and Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, University College, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK 1 Corresponding author e-mail: j.collinge@prion.ucl.ac.uk

Received August 1, 2002; revised September 24, 2002; accepted October 17, 2002

Abstract


Variant CreutzfeldtJakob disease (vCJD) has been recognized to date only in individuals homozygous for methionine at PRNP codon 129. Here we show that transgenic mice expressing human PrP methionine 129, inoculated with either bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or variant CJD prions, may develop the neuropathological and molecular phenotype of vCJD, consistent with these diseases being caused by the same prion strain. Surprisingly, however, BSE transmission to these transgenic mice, in addition to producing a vCJD-like phenotype, can also result in a distinct molecular phenotype that is indistinguishable from that of sporadic CJD with PrPSc type 2. These data suggest that more than one BSE-derived prion strain might infect humans; it is therefore possible that some patients with a phenotype consistent with sporadic CJD may have a disease arising from BSE exposure...

http://embojournal.npgjournals.com/cgi/content/full/21/23/6358

THE new findings of BASE in cattle in Italy of Identification of a
second bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy: Molecular
similarities with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0305777101v1


Adaptation of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent to primates
and comparison with Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease: Implications for
human health

THE findings from Corinne Ida Lasmézas*, [dagger] , Jean-Guy Fournier*,
Virginie Nouvel*,

Hermann Boe*, Domíníque Marcé*, François Lamoury*, Nicolas Kopp [Dagger

] , Jean-Jacques Hauw§, James Ironside¶, Moira Bruce [||] , Dominique

Dormont*, and Jean-Philippe Deslys* et al, that The agent responsible
for French iatrogenic growth hormone-linked CJD taken as a control is
very different from vCJD but is similar to that found in one case of
sporadic CJD and one sheep scrapie isolate;

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/041490898v1

Characterization of two distinct prion strains
derived from bovine spongiform encephalopathy
transmissions to inbred mice

Sarah E. Lloyd, Jacqueline M. Linehan, Melanie Desbruslais,
Susan Joiner, Jennifer Buckell, Sebastian Brandner,
Jonathan D. F. Wadsworth and John Collinge

Correspondence
John Collinge
j.collinge@prion.ucl.ac.uk

MRC Prion Unit and Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology,
University College, London WC1N 3BG, UK
Received 9 December 2003
Accepted 27 April 2004

Distinct prion strains can be distinguished by differences in incubation period, neuropathology
and biochemical properties of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in inoculated mice.
Reliable comparisons of mouse prion strain properties can only be achieved after passage in
genetically identical mice, as host prion protein sequence and genetic background are known
to modulate prion disease phenotypes. While multiple prion strains have been identified in
sheep scrapie and CreutzfeldtJakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is
thought to be caused by a single prion strain. Primary passage of BSE prions to different lines
of inbred mice resulted in the propagation of two distinct PrPSc types, suggesting that two
prion strains may have been isolated. To investigate this further, these isolates were
subpassaged in a single line of inbred mice (SJL) and it was confirmed that two distinct prion
strains had been identified. MRC1 was characterized by a short incubation time (110±3 days),
a mono-glycosylated-dominant PrPSc type and a generalized diffuse pattern of PrP-immunoreactive
deposits, while MRC2 displayed a much longer incubation time (155±1 days),
a di-glycosylated-dominant PrPSc type and a distinct pattern of PrP-immunoreactive deposits
and neuronal loss. These data indicate a crucial involvement of the host genome in modulating
prion strain selection and propagation in mice. It is possible that multiple disease phenotypes
may also be possible in BSE prion infection in humans and other animals.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/8/2471

Gerald Wells: Report of the Visit to USA, April-May 1989

snip...

The general opinion of those present was that BSE, as an
overt disease phenomenon, _could exist in the USA, but if it did,
it was very rare. The need for improved and specific surveillance
methods to detect it as recognised...

snip...

It is clear that USDA have little information and _no_ regulatory
responsibility for rendering plants in the US...

snip...

3. Prof. A. Robertson gave a brief account of BSE. The US approach
was to accord it a _very low profile indeed_. Dr. A Thiermann showed
the picture in the ''Independent'' with cattle being incinerated and thought
this was a fanatical incident to be _avoided_ in the US _at all costs_...

snip...

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

To be published in the Proceedings of the
Fourth International Scientific Congress in
Fur Animal Production. Toronto, Canada,
August 21-28, 1988

Evidence That Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy
Results from Feeding Infected Cattle

R.F. Marsh* and G.R. Hartsough

•Department of Veterinary Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison,
Wisconsin 53706; and ^Emba/Creat Lakes Ranch Service, Thiensville, Wisconsin 53092

ABSTRACT
Epidemiologic investigation of a new incidence of
transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in Stetsonville, Wisconsin
suggests that the disease may have resulted from feeding infected
cattle to mink. This observation is supported by the transmission of
a TME-like disease to experimentally inoculated cattle, and by the
recent report of a new bovine spongiform encephalopathy in
England.

INTRODUCTION

Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) was first reported in 1965 by Hartsough
and Burger who demonstrated that the disease was transmissible with a long incubation
period, and that affected mink had a spongiform encephalopathy similar to that found in
scrapie-affecied sheep (Hartsough and Burger, 1965; Burger and Hartsough, 1965).
Because of the similarity between TME and scrapie, and the subsequent finding that the
two transmissible agents were indistinguishable (Marsh and Hanson, 1969), it was
concluded that TME most likely resulted from feeding mink scrapie-infecied sheep.
The experimental transmission of sheep scrapie to mink (Hanson et al., 1971)
confirmed the close association of TME and scrapie, but at the same time provided
evidence that they may be different. Epidemiologic studies on previous incidences of
TME indicated that the incubation periods in field cases were between six months and
one year in length (Harxsough and Burger, 1965). Experimentally, scrapie could not be
transmitted to mink in less than one year.
To investigate the possibility that TME may be caused by a (particular strain of
scrapie which might be highly pathogenic for mink, 21 different strains of the scrapie
agent, including their sheep or goat sources, were inoculated into a total of 61 mink.
Only one mink developed a progressive neurologic disease after an incubation period of
22 mon..s (Marsh and Hanson, 1979). These results indicated that TME was either caused
by a strain of sheep scrapie not yet tested, or was due to exposure to a scrapie-like agent
from an unidentified source.

OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS

A New Incidence of TME. In April of 1985, a mink rancher in Stetsonville, Wisconsin
reported that many of his mink were "acting funny", and some had died. At this time, we
visited the farm and found that approximately 10% of all adult mink were showing
typical signs of TME: insidious onset characterized by subtle behavioral changes, loss of
normal habits of cleanliness, deposition of droppings throughout the pen rather than in a
single area, hyperexcitability, difficulty in chewing and swallowing, and tails arched over
their _backs like squirrels. These signs were followed by progressive deterioration of
neurologic function beginning with locomoior incoordination, long periods of somnolence
in which the affected mink would stand motionless with its head in the corner of the
cage, complete debilitation, and death. Over the next 8-10 weeks, approximately 40% of
all the adult mink on the farm died from TME.
Since previous incidences of TME were associated with common or shared feeding
practices, we obtained a careful history of feed ingredients used over the past 12-18
months. The rancher was a "dead stock" feeder using mostly (>95%) downer or dead dairy
cattle and a few horses. Sheep had never been fed.

Experimental Transmission. The clinical diagnosis of TME was confirmed by
histopaihologic examination and by experimental transmission to mink after incubation
periods of four months. To investigate the possible involvement of cattle in this disease
cycle, two six-week old castrated Holstein bull calves were inoculated intracerebrally
with a brain suspension from affected mink. Each developed a fatal spongiform
encephalopathy after incubation periods of 18 and 19 months.

DISCUSSION
These findings suggest that TME may result from feeding mink infected cattle and
we have alerted bovine practitioners that there may exist an as yet unrecognized
scrapie-like disease of cattle in the United States (Marsh and Hartsough, 1986). A new
bovine spongiform encephalopathy has recently been reported in England (Wells et al.,
1987), and investigators are presently studying its transmissibility and possible
relationship to scrapie. Because this new bovine disease in England is characterized by
behavioral changes, hyperexcitability, and agressiveness, it is very likely it would be
confused with rabies in the United Stales and not be diagnosed. Presently, brains from
cattle in the United States which are suspected of rabies infection are only tested with
anti-rabies virus antibody and are not examined histopathologically for lesions of
spongiform encephalopathy.
We are presently pursuing additional studies to further examine the possible
involvement of cattle in the epidemiology of TME. One of these is the backpassage of
our experimental bovine encephalopathy to mink. Because (here are as yet no agent-
specific proteins or nucleic acids identified for these transmissible neuropathogens, one
means of distinguishing them is by animal passage and selection of the biotype which
grows best in a particular host. This procedure has been used to separate hamster-
adapted and mink-udapted TME agents (Marsh and Hanson, 1979). The intracerebral
backpassage of the experimental bovine agent resulted in incubations of only four months
indicating no de-adaptation of the Stetsonville agent for mink after bovine passage.
Mink fed infected bovine brain remain normal after six months. It will be essential to
demonstrate oral transmission fiom bovine to mink it this proposed epidemiologic
association is to be confirmed.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
These studies were supported by the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences,
University of Wisconsin-Madison and by a grant (85-CRCR-1-1812) from the United
States Department of Agriculture. The authors also wish to acknowledge the help and
encouragement of Robert Hanson who died during the course of these investigations.

REFERENCES
Burger, D. and Hartsough, G.R. 1965. Encephalopathy of mink. II. Experimental and
natural transmission. J. Infec. Dis. 115:393-399.
Hanson, R.P., Eckroade, R.3., Marsh, R.F., ZuRhein, C.M., Kanitz, C.L. and Gustatson,
D.P. 1971. Susceptibility of mink to sheep scrapie. Science 172:859-861.
Hansough, G.R. and Burger, D. 1965. Encephalopathy of mink. I. Epizoociologic and
clinical observations. 3. Infec. Dis. 115:387-392.
Marsh, R.F. and Hanson, R.P. 1969. Physical and chemical properties of the
transmissible mink encephalopathy agent. 3. ViroL 3:176-180.
Marsh, R.F. and Hanson, R.P. 1979. On the origin of transmissible mink
encephalopathy. In Hadlow, W.J. and Prusiner, S.P. (eds.) Slow transmissible
diseases of the nervous system. Vol. 1, Academic Press, New York, pp 451-460.
Marsh, R.F. and Hartsough, G.R. 1986. Is there a scrapie-like disease in cattle?
Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Western Conference for Food Animal Veterinary
Medicine. University of Arizona, pp 20.
Wells, G.A.H., Scott, A.C., Johnson, C.T., Cunning, R.F., Hancock, R.D., Jeffrey, M.,
Dawson, M. and Bradley, R. 1987. A novel progressive spongiform encephalopathy
in cattle. Vet. Rec. 121:419-420.

MARSH

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m09/tab05.pdf

ALL animals for human/animal consumption must be tested for TSE.

ALL human TSEs must be made reportable Nationally and Internationally...TSS



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