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From: TSS ()
Subject: Canadian Beef Entered U.S. Due to Lax Oversight -USDA (more silly-putty plugging those leaky cealed USA borders)
Date: February 16, 2005 at 2:59 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Canadian Beef Entered U.S. Due to Lax Oversight -USDA
Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 16:49:04 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Canadian Beef Entered U.S. Due to Lax Oversight -USDA
Wed Feb 16, 2005 05:31 PM ET


By Randy Fabi

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Lax oversight by the U.S. Agriculture Department
and confused food safety inspectors were to blame for imports of 42,000
pounds of Canadian beef products in 2004 that violated a U.S. mad cow
disease ban, federal investigators said on Wednesday.

The USDA's Office of Inspector General issued a report on the 2004
import mistakes less than a month before the federal government is
scheduled to further lift restrictions on beef and cattle trade with
Canada.

The report analyzed how the USDA mistakenly allowed processed Canadian
beef products into the United States between August 2003 and April 2004.
Some federal meat inspectors were confused by Washington's announcement
in August 2003 to partially reopen the U.S. border to boneless beef from
young Canadian cattle, the investigators found.

The United States banned all Canadian cattle and beef products after
Canada discovered its first native case of mad cow disease in May 2003.
In August 2003, the USDA decided to allow shipments of boneless beef
from young Canadian cattle, which are thought to carry little risk of
the disease.

But some U.S. meat inspectors independently began allowing shipments of
other Canadian beef products such as cattle tongues, hearts, kidneys and
lips, the report said.

"Agency officials asserted that they believed that they could add
products to the list of the risk factors and risk levels associated with
such products were consistent with the products listed in the initial
announcement," the 50-page report said.

The USDA inspector general said it identified 42,000 pounds of product
with "questionable eligibility" that entered the U.S. market.

That volume is much less than the 3.5 million pounds initially estimated
by R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, which first discovered USDA's
mistake. The activist group won a court order in April 2004 to halt the
Bush administration from easing its Canadian ban further.

The USDA has said the banned products that did enter the U.S. market
from August 2003 through April 2004 did not pose a health risk to
consumers.

The USDA said it agreed with many of the recommendations of the
inspector general, including closer monitoring of import permits and the
immediate posting of import policy changes on the Internet.

The USDA is scheduled on March 7 to begin allowing imports of more
Canadian beef products as well as shipments of Canadian live cattle
under 30 months of age.

© Reuters 2005. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=7653277

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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