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From: TSS (pool156-29.dial-u1.hou.wt.net)
Subject: Re: VERMONT SHEEP ATYPICAL TSE 'DECLARATION OF EMERGENCY' AND NATURAL GOAT BSE
Date: February 3, 2005 at 6:52 pm PST

In Reply to: VERMONT SHEEP ATYPICAL TSE 'DECLARATION OF EMERGENCY' AND NATURAL GOAT BSE posted by TSS on February 2, 2005 at 4:40 pm:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: First case of BSE in a goat: Member States support Commission proposal for increased testing
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 09:43:04 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

First case of BSE in a goat: Member States support Commission
proposal for increased testing
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Référence: IP/05/132 Date: 02/02/2005
HTML: FR

EN

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PDF: FR

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DOC: FR

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IP/05/132

Brussels, 2 February 2005


First case of BSE in a goat: Member States support Commission proposal
for increased testing

The Member States today voted in favour of the European Commissions
proposal to step up testing for BSE in the EU goat population, following
the confirmation last week of the first case of BSE found in a goat. The
testing scheme was proposed by the Commission to determine if this BSE
case represents an isolated incident or if further measures need to be
taken. The situation will be closely monitored and reviewed at the
latest after six months, based on the results of the increased testing
and the outcome of a quantitative risk assessment on the safety of goat
meat currently being carried out by the European Food Safety Authority
(EFSA).

Markos Kyprianou, EU Commissioner responsible for Health and Consumer
Protection, said Our priority is to safeguard the health of Europes
citizens and I therefore want to act quickly to determine the
significance of this case. That is why we are significantly stepping up
the level of testing. We will monitor the situation closely and review
all the data and scientific advice again in six months.

The Commission is proposing increased testing in goats for at least 6
months (176 000 tests of healthy goats in the EU and 25 000 goats dead
on farm) to determine if this is an isolated incident. The extent of the
monitoring programme will be based on the goat population in each Member
State and will focus primarily on Member States where BSE is present in
the cattle population. All confirmed TSE cases will be subjected to a
three-step testing scheme, already in use, which will make it possible
to differentiate between scrapie and BSE. The Commission will co-finance
this increased testing.

Following the findings by a research group in France of a suspected BSE
infection in a goat, the European Commission immediately made the
findings public on 28 October 2004 (see IP/04/1324
).
The case was confirmed on 28 January 2005 (see IP/05/105
)
and today the Commission presented its proposal for increased testing to
the Standing Committee for the Food Chain and Animal Health (SCFCAH),
representing the Member States. This proposal will now formally be
adopted by the European Commission in the coming days and will enter
into force immediately after publication in the Official Journal.

The Annex gives an indication of the number of tests to be carried out
in the Member States. This information is only indicative, based on the
number of animals slaughtered in each Member State in 2004, to show the
approximate distribution across the Member States: actual numbers will
vary.

See also MEMO/05/29

for more information.

Annex

Table: Monitoring of healthy slaughtered goats and fallen stock
(6 months)


Indicative Number of samples
Healthy slaughtered goats
Dead goats on farm
A
2,500
100 (**)
BE
160 (*)
100 (**)
CY
2,500
500
CZ
40 (*)
100 (**)
DE
650 (*)
500
DK
100 (*)
100 (**)
EE
210 (*)
100 (**)
EL
10,000
5000
ES
62,750
5000
FIN
30 (*)
100 (**)
FR
46,500
5000
HU
300 (*)
500
IRL
450 (*)
100 (**)
IT
30,000
5000
L
120 (*)
100 (**)
LT
1,360 (*)
100 (**)
LV
250 (*)
100 (**)
MT
30 (*)
100 (**)
NL
2,400 (*)
500
PL
8,600 (*)
500
PT
6,000 (*)
1500
S
60 (*)
100 (**)
SK
240 (*)
100 (**)
SL
10 (*)
100 (**)
UK
780 (*)
500
Total EU 25
176,040
25,900

(*) 100% testing of healthy slaughtered animals

(**) 100% testing up to 100


http://europa.eu.int/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/05/132&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=fr

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: BSE agent in goat tissue: first known naturally occurring case confirmed Eurosurveillance
Date: Thu, 3 Feb 2005 16:18:41 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

BSE agent in goat tissue: first known naturally occurring case confirmed

Editorial team eurosurveillance.weekly@hpa.org.uk
Eurosurveillance editorial
office

On 28 January, the European Commission confirmed the first known
naturally occurring case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent
in a goat, slaughtered in France in 2002 [1]. Previously, sheep and
goats had only been experimentally infected. The results have only been
made available now, as the confirmatory tests included mouse bioassays,
which took two years to complete.

Neither the infected goat, nor any other goat from the same herd,
entered either the food or feed chain. This incident is therefore not
considered to represent a risk to public health. The entire herd was
slaughtered after the infected goat was first suspected to be infected
with BSE agent. All adult goats in the herd were tested, and no other
goat was found to have BSE infection or to show other signs of BSE
disease [2].

The infected goat was born in 2000. A ban on feeding meat and bone meal
(MBM) to ruminants (i.e cattle, sheep and goats) has been in place since
1994; this was extended to all farmed animals in 2001. Goats in the
European Union generally only live for a few years, which means that the
majority of goats in the EU today were born after the total feed ban was
put in place. Nevertheless, in response to this case of confirmed
natural BSE infection in a goat, the Commission is proposing to improve
vigilance for such incidents by increasing BSE testing of goats, and has
set a target of 200 000 healthy goats tested in the European Union over
the next six months. The current EU wide surveillance programme,
designed to detect suspicious TSE strains in small ruminants in the EU,
has tested 140 000 goats since 2002 [3].

It is proposed that the TSE monitoring programme will concentrate on
member states where BSE is present in cattle. All confirmed cases of
transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, includes scrapie) will
undergo three-stage testing (already in use), which will differentiate
between scrapie and BSE. These additional measures will be submitted for
member states approval at the beginning of February.

As a precautionary measure and following scientific advice, milk and
meat from goats which are affected by any type of transmissible
spongiform encephalopathy (including scrapie) cannot currently be used,
following a recommendation in 2001 from the European Commission
Scientific Steering Committee [4]. Specified risk materials (the tissues
most likely to carry infectivity if the disease is present) are also
removed from all goats, even if healthy [5,6]. These rules were in place
before the case of BSE in a goat was discovered, and no change has been
advised. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA,
http://www.efsa.eu.int/) has advised that, based on current scientific
knowledge, goat milk and derived products are unlikely to present any
risk of TSE contamination if the milk comes from healthy animals [7]. It
advises no change in current consumption of goat milk, cheese and meat.

The European Commission has asked the EFSA to carry out a quantitative
risk assessment for goat meat and goat meat products, which is expected
to be ready by July 2005. Further information can be found on the
European Commission pages Food Safety  from the Farm to the Fork
http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/index_en.htm


References:

1. European Commission. Case of BSE in a goat confirmed: Commission
extends testing programme. Press release IP/05/105, 28 January
2005.
http://europa.eu.int/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/05/105&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=fr

2. OIE. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in a goat in France. Press
release, 1 February 2005. http://www.oie.int/eng/press/en_050201b.htm
3. European Commission. Commission submits French Research Findings
on TSE in a goat to Expert Panel. Press release IP/04/1324, 28
October 2004.
http://europa.eu.int/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/04/1324&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en

4. Scientific Steering Committee of the European Commission. TSEs in
small ruminants should BSE in small ruminants become
probable/confirmed. 18-19 October 2001. European Commission Health
and Consumer Protection Directorate General.
http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out234_en.pdf

5. Eurosurveillance. BSE agent in goat tissue: precautions discussed.
Eurosurveillance Weekly 2004; 8(51): 16/12/2004.
http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ew/2004/041216.asp#4
6. European Commission Health & Consumer Protection
Directorate-General. Opinion on safe sourcing of small ruminant
materials (safe sourcing of small ruminant materials should BSE in
small ruminants become probable: genotype, breeding, rapid TSE
testing, flocks certification and specified risk materials).
Adopted by the Scientific Steering Committee at its meeting of 4-5
April 2002. http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out257_en.pdf
7. European Food Safety Authority. Statement of the EFSA Scientific
Expert Working Group on BSE/TSE of the Scientific Panel on
Biological Hazards on the health risks of the consumption of milk
and milk derived products from goats. 26 November 2004
http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/biohaz/biohaz_documents/709/bdoc_statement_goatsmilk_en1.pdf

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ew/2005/050203.asp

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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