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From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. (216-119-144-20.ipset24.wt.net)
Subject: MAD COW BSE UPDATE NORTH AMERICA 'CANADA' (as of January 31, 2005 - 16:00 EST) one big happy PETRE DISH of TSEs
Date: February 1, 2005 at 1:39 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: MAD COW BSE UPDATE NORTH AMERICA 'CANADA' (as of January 31, 2005 - 16:00 EST) one big happy PETRE DISH of TSEs
Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 15:26:55 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
BSE in North America


Latest Information


Latest Information (as of January 31, 2005 - 16:00 EST)

* Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) today announced proposed
regulations

to remove import restrictions from a range of currently prohibited
U.S. commodities.
* Based on the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal
Health, the CFIA plans to permit the importation of live cattle
born in 1998 or later, beef from animals of any age from which
specified risk material has been removed and various other
commodities.
* Products that may pose risks, such as certain animal feeds, will
remain prohibited.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/situatione.shtml

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
News Release


CANADA PROPOSES NEW SCIENCE-BASED IMPORT REGULATIONS TO ALLOW EXPANDED
ACCESS FOR U.S. CATTLE AND BEEF PRODUCTS

OTTAWA, January 31, 2005 -- The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
today announced proposed regulations to remove import restrictions from
a range of currently prohibited U.S. commodities. These restrictions
were introduced following the detection of bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE) in Washington State on December 23, 2003.

Based on the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health, the
CFIA plans to permit the importation of live cattle born in 1998 or
later, beef from animals of any age from which specified risk material
has been removed and various other commodities. Products that may pose
risks, such as certain animal feeds, will remain prohibited.

The proposed regulations will further align Canada's BSE-specific policy
for imports from the United States with science-based international
guidelines for safe trade, which are designed to protect public and
animal health.

With respect to bluetongue and anaplasmosis, the proposed regulations
will allow for year-round access for U.S. feeder cattle destined for
slaughter into Canadian feedlots, while maintaining the highest level of
animal health protection. Additionally, work to expand the scope for
further change relative to breeding cattle will follow the publication
this year of a recently completed study conducted in Alberta.

"Our response to BSE continues to be based on science, and science
clearly demonstrates that safe trade can and should continue with
appropriate safeguards in place," said Agriculture and Agri-Food
Minister Andy Mitchell. "The consistent public and animal health
measures that the United States and Canada have adopted will allow us to
move toward the full reintegration of our markets."

The proposed regulations

have been published in Canada Gazette I. A 30-day comment period ending
on March 1, 2005 is being provided to allow interested parties the
opportunity to provide comments. In the interim, current import
restrictions will remain in effect.

The CFIA is currently developing a broader BSE-related import policy
that will apply to any country that has reported the disease. As with
the currently proposed regulations, this new policy will reflect the
Government's ongoing commitment to follow recognized science and the
most current understanding of BSE. The CFIA is confident that moving
Canada's import policy toward international guidelines will encourage
other countries to adopt similar, more appropriate approaches.

- 30 -

For information:

Elizabeth Whiting
Minister's Office: (613) 759-1761

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Media relations: (613) 228-6682

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/newcom/2005/20050131e.shtml

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Liaison, Preparedness and Policy Coordination


ANIMALS OF THE SUB-FAMILY BOVINAE AND THEIR PRODUCTS IMPORTATION
PROHIBITION REGULATIONS

Amendment
|
Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement


------------------------------------------------------------------------

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food
and the Solicitor General of Canada, pursuant to section 14 of the
Health of Animals Acta
,
propose to make the annexed Animals of the Sub-family Bovinae and Their
Products Importation Prohibition Regulations.

Interested persons may make representations respecting the proposed
Regulations within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice.
All such representations must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the
date of publication of this notice, and be addressed to Ms. Linda
Morrison, Animal Health and Production Division, Canadian Food
Inspection Agency, 59 Camelot Drive, Nepean, Ontario, K1A 0Y9 (Tel.:
(613) 225-2342 (4368); Fax: (613) 228-228-6614; E-mail:
lmorrison@inspection.gc.ca).

------------------------------------------------------------------------

a S.C. 1990, c. 21

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Anne McLellan
Solicitor General

------------------------------------------------------------------------

interpretation

1. (1) The following definitions apply in these Regulations.

"Bovinae specified risk material" means

(a) the skull, brain, trigeminal ganglia, eyes, spinal cord and dorsal
root ganglia of animals of the sub-family Bovinae aged 30 months or
older; and

(b) the distal ileum and tonsils of animals of the sub-family Bovinae of
all ages. (matériel à risque spécifié de boviné)

"meat product" has the same meaning as in subsection 2(1) of the Meat
Inspection Act. (produit de viande)

(2) Words and expressions used in these Regulations and not defined in
the Health of Animals Act or these Regulations have the same meaning as
in section 2 of the Health of Animals Regulations.

prohibition

2. (1) No person shall import into Canada from the United States, during
the period beginning on the day on which these Regulations come into
force and ending on June 30, 2006, any of the following animals or things:

(a) animals of the sub-family Bovinae born before January 1, 1998;

(b) meat products derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae from
which the Bovinae specified risk material has not been removed and
things containing those meat products;

(c) ingredients derived from ruminants to be used in animal food, and
animal food containing those ingredients;

(d) ingredients, other than manure, derived from ruminants to be used in
fertilizer, and fertilizer containing those ingredients; or

(e) Bovinae specified risk material and things containing or derived
from Bovinae specified risk material.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to

(a) cattle imported for immediate slaughter that are subject to the
requirements of section 5 of Part III of the import reference document
as defined in section 10 of the Health of Animals Regulations;

(b) animals and things derived from them imported for medical use,
scientific research or zoological collections;

(c) animals of the sub-family Bovinae imported into Canada for a maximum
of 30 days;

(d) bulls destined for animal semen production centres;

(e) animals and things identified in paragraph 51(b) of the Health of
Animals Regulations carrying an animal pathogen or part of one and that
are imported into Canada under a permit issued under section 160 of
those Regulations;

(f) products of a rendering plant imported into Canada under a permit
issued under section 160 of the Health of Animals Regulations;

(g) meat products originating in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada,
New Zealand or Uruguay that are processed in the United States;

(h) meat products originating in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, New
Zealand or Uruguay that are in-transit through the United States;

(i) meat products to be transported to a community in the United States
where the only practical transportation route for the meat products is
either a land or water route through Canada as determined by the Agency,
taking into account the location of the community and the time required
to transport them;

(j) meat products to be transported non-stop in Canada and to be
delivered to a cruise ship for use as ships' stores;

(k) meat products that are kept on a ship as ships' stores;

(l) a food containing a meat product that is of insignificant quantity
having regard to the nature of the food and the nature of the meat
product in the food;

(m) meat products to be used for personal consumption if the total
weight of the meat products is 5 kg or less;

(n) milk and milk derivatives;

(o) hides and skins that do not come from the head of an animal and
derivatives of those hides and skins;

(p) things produced by subjecting bones and tissues, other than bones
and tissues from Bovinae specified risk material, to rigorous processes
of extraction and purification;

(q) meat products that do not contain any Bovinae specified risk
material and that are imported, in accordance with subsection 9(1) of
the Meat Inspection Act, for the commercial preparation of pet food;

(r) finished pet chews, such as dried processed ears, pizzles, hooves or
tendons, that do not contain, and are not derived from, Bovinae
specified risk material;

(s) finished pet chews, such as dried processed ears, pizzles, hooves or
tendons, that do not contain, and are not derived from, the vertebral
column of animals of the sub-family Bovinae;

(t) commercially prepared pet food that does not contain ingredients
derived from animals of the sub-family Bovinae;

(u) commercially prepared pet food that contains ingredients derived
from animals of the sub-family Bovinae if

(i) the ingredients are not derived from Bovinae specified risk material, or

(ii) the animals from which the ingredients are derived originate in
Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, New Zealand or Uruguay;

(v) commercially prepared pet food that is destined to be fed to an
importer's pet if the total weight of the pet food is 8 kg or less;

(w) protein-free tallow with a maximum level of insoluble impurities of
0.15% by weight and derivatives made from such tallow;

(x) household garbage from the United States containing protein from an
animal; or

(y) aircraft garbage and ship's refuse as those terms are defined in
subsection 47.1(1) of the Health of Animals Regulations.

repeal

3. The Animals of the Family Bovidae and Their Products Importation
Prohibition Regulations, No. 21

are repealed.

coming into force

4. These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are
registered.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 SOR/2004-90

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/reg/consultation/20107_e.shtml


Jan Lyons, President
January 18, 2005
Page 2

January 18, 2005

Jan Lyons, President
National Cattlemens Beef Association
9110 East Nichols Ave Suite 300
Centennial, CO 80112

Sent via Facsimile: 303-694-2851

Dear President Lyons,

It is unfortunate for the United States cattle industry that the National
Cattlemens Beef Association (NCBA) and R-CALF United Stockgrowers of
America (R-CALF USA) have, for the past 20 months, disagreed on the
appropriate measures needed to adequately protect the health and safety
of our
domestic cattle herd and our consumers against the introduction of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from Canada.

However, during the past few days I have reviewed reports and statements
issued by you and your organization suggesting that NCBA may be
reconsidering
its previous support for the United States Department of Agricultures
(USDAs)
Final Rule that would establish a new classification of minimal BSE-risk
regions,
and the agencys decision to add Canada to that new classification.

Our past disagreements on this important matter have sent conflicting
signals to the President and to Congress. Whenever decision-makers receive
conflicting signals from an industry, there is little incentive for them
to change
their present course. The fact that the President and his Administration
remain on
a course to implement this Final Rule indicates this is the very
condition we find
ourselves in today.

I believe now is the time for NCBA and its affiliates, along with R-CALF
USA and its affiliates, to set aside organizational differences and join
together as
a unified industry to cause USDA to withdraw its Final Rule.

As you know, R-CALF USA filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court last
week to accomplish this objective. This lawsuit provides an effective
focal point
for the President, his Administration, and Congress to accurately assess
the
legitimate concerns of the United States cattle industry regarding the
Final Rule.

Jan Lyons, President
January 18, 2005
Page 2


For the good of the U.S. cattle industry, I invite NCBA and all of its
affiliates to
immediately issue public statements in support of the lawsuit already
filed by R-CALF USA to
prevent the implementation of the USDA Final Rule.

If NCBA and its affiliates would further announce that they, along with
R-CALF USA
and its affiliates will join together to lobby Congress to defeat the
Final Rule, the resulting
demonstration of unity by the U.S. cattle industry will undoubtedly
convince Congress to act
decisively to veto USDAs Final Rule.

We have reached the 11th hour on this critically important issue.
Independent cattle
producers expect, and deserve, to have their national and state
cattle-producer organizations set
aside their differences on issues of such monumental importance as the
prevention of BSE from
imports.

R-CALF USA looks forward to working with NCBA to prevent the
implementation of
USDAs Final Rule. Please let me know if NCBA will accept this invitation.

Sincerely,

Leo McDonnell
President

http://www.r-calfusa.com/01-17-05%20--%20Lttr%202%20NCBA,%20Final.pdf


AND the final rule is the ;

Regulatory Flexibility Act; Amended Plan for Reviewing Regulations Under
Section 610

(was nothing more than lies or promises they are now taking back,
nothing new here...TSS)

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=/OPPDE/rdad/FRPubs/04-040N.htm


WHICH gave way for;

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE
DIRECTIVE ?
WASHINGTON, DC REVISION ?
AMENDMENT ? CHANGE TRANSMITTAL SHEET
OTHER ?
FSIS Notices BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPAHTY (BSE) FSIS 4-04 1/31/05
NOTICES 5-04
7-04
9-04
EXTENSION OF EFFECTIVE DATE FOR BOVINE SPONGIFORM
ENCEPHALOPAHTY (BSE) FSIS NOTICES
FSIS is extending the expiration date for the following FSIS Notices
until February 1,
2006:


FSIS Notice 4-04, Awareness Meeting Regarding New Regulations That
Prohibit Non-
Ambulatory Disabled Cattle and the Use of Certain Materials From Cattle
for Human
Food

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/4-04.htm


FSIS Notice 5-04, Interim Guidance For Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle
and Age
Determination

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/5-04.htm


FSIS Notice 7-04, Questions and Answers For FSIS Notice 4-04 Regarding
FSIS's BSE
Regulations

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/7-04.htm


FSIS Notice 9-04, Verification Instructions For The Interim Final Rule
Regarding
Specified Risk Materials (SRMs) In Cattle

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/9-04.htm


These notices are due to expire February 1, 2005. However, it is
necessary for the
notices and instructions provided in them to remain in effect until FSIS
takes final action
on the interim final rule, Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk
Materials for Human
Food and Requirements for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disable
Cattle. Once
the Agency does so, FSIS will reissue the relevant information from
these notices in a
FSIS Directive.
Philip S. Derfler /s/
Assistant Administrator
Office of Policy, Program, and Employee Development
DISTRIBUTION: Inspection Offices, T/A Inspectors, OPI: OPPED
Plant Mgt., T/A Plant Mgt., TRA, ABB, PRD, Import
Offices


http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/BSE_FSIS_Notice_Extension.pdf


WHICH IN TURN gives way for more of this ;

http://www.fortunecity.com/healthclub/cpr/798/cjd.htm

http://www.htmlgear.tripod.com/guest/control.guest?u=cjdvoice&i=1001&a=view

http://www.htmlgear.tripod.com/gw/guest/control.guest?u=bmathews&a=view&i=1&r=http://www.fortunecity.com/healthclub/cpr/349/part1cjd.htm

http://guestbooks.pathfinder.gr/read/hbsef


PROMISES mean nothing to this administration, including the dead and dying.
IT'S all about trade $$$ Science has nothing to do with it anymore;

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)
Publication date: 20 August 2004

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

* 167 kB Report


* 105 kB Summary

Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working
Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission
(EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United
States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more
cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in
USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004
based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached
domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in
the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and
therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is
possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached
domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle
imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were
processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This
risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90's when
domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the
low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with
continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or
pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no
significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains
extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently
increases.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html


CANADA

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/563/sr02_biohaz02_canada_report_annex_en1.pdf

MEXICO

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/566/sr04_biohaz02_mexico_report_annex_en1.pdf


Canada and the United States have been raised to level III (presence of
BSE likely but not confirmed, or confirmed at a lower level) following a
new assessment taking into account the most recent evidence. EFSAs
Scientific Expert Working Group on geographic BSE risk assessment also
evaluated the status of Mexico and South Africa which were classified as
level III.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/press_room/press_release/575_en.html


Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9d?OpenDocument&AutoFramed


Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION]

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt


Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From Use in

Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed

Comment Number: EC -10

Accepted - Volume 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html

PART 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html

PDF]Freas, William TSS SUBMISSION

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat -

Page 1. J Freas, William From: Sent: To: Subject: Terry S. Singeltary

Sr. [flounder@wt.net] Monday, January 08,200l 3:03 PM freas ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3681s2_09.pdf

Asante/Collinge et al, that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine

genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable

from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm

N. America is nothing more than one big happy PETRE DISH of TSEs and
positive inconclusives...


TSS


######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########





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