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From: TSS (216-119-144-34.ipset24.wt.net)
Subject: CWD DISCOVERED IN FAR WESTERN WISONSIN NOW
Date: January 27, 2005 at 2:41 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: CWD DISCOVERED IN FAR WESTERN WISONSIN NOW
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 16:05:54 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Deer with CWD found on Crawford County farm

(Published Thursday, January 27, 2005 09:46:18 AM CST)

Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. - A whitetail deer that died on a Crawford County game
farm had chronic wasting disease, making it the first deer with the
ailment found in far western Wisconsin, state agriculture officials said
Wednesday.

The 19-month-old buck was part of a herd of about 40 deer owned by
Curtis Christensen of Eastman, state Veterinarian Dr. Robert Ehlenfeldt
said.

The state quarantined the herd last week, meaning Christensen can't let
live deer leave his farm, Ehlenfeldt said.

So far, 28 farm-raised deer or elk in Wisconsin have tested positive for
chronic wasting disease on seven farms, said Donna Gilson, a spokeswoman
for the state Agriculture Department. The other farms were in Manitowoc,
Portage, Racine, Sauk and Walworth counties, all in central or eastern
Wisconsin.

Gilson said experts saw no significance in the western Wisconsin case,
as all the game farms with infected deer were in the southern half of
the state.

The Crawford County buck was the youngest farm-raised deer to die of the
disease so far, she said.

"We don't have information on whether it was born on the farm or came
from elsewhere," Gilson said.

The fatal disease was first found in Wisconsin in the wild deer herd in
February 2002. The disease was seen as a threat to the state's hunting
industry because of concerns about the safety of eating venison. Experts
say there is no scientific evidence the disease can infect humans, but
the World Health Organization advises people not to eat any part of a
deer with evidence of the disease.

So far, testing has found 397 wild deer with the disease in nine
southern counties: Columbia, Dane, Green, Iowa, Kenosha, Richland, Rock,
Sauk and Walworth, according to the Department of Natural Resources.

The DNR has tested about 72,200 wild deer and 11,000 farm-raised deer
and elk for the disease.

The state has placed 20 game farms under quarantine because they had at
least one CWD-positive animal, they were linked to infected herds or
they were inside special DNR chronic wasting disease zones, Gilson said.

Wisconsin has 542 licensed deer and elk farms that as of July raised
30,510 animals.

http://www.gazetteextra.com/gundeer_wasting012705.asp

CWD UPDATE 2004

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/wildlife/whealth/issues/cwd/insert04.pdf

TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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