SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS (216-119-144-1.ipset24.wt.net)
Subject: BSE; Minimal Risk Regions and Importation of Commodities; Availability of an Environmental Assessment With Corrections and Extension of Comment Period
Date: January 21, 2005 at 1:39 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal Risk Regions and Importation of Commodities; Availability of an Environmental Assessment With Corrections and Extension of Comment Period
Date: Fri, 21 Jan 2005 12:02:28 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

[Federal Register: January 21, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 13)]
[Notices]
[Page 3183-3184]
>From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr21ja05-20]

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

[Docket No. 03-080-5]
RIN 0579-AB73


Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Minimal Risk Regions and
Importation of Commodities; Availability of an Environmental Assessment
With Corrections and Extension of Comment Period

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Notice of availability and extension of comment period.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service is making available a corrected version of an
environmental assessment relative to a final rule that was published in
the January 4, 2005, issue of the Federal Register. We are making the
corrected version of the environmental assessment available to the
public for review and comment through February 17, 2005.

DATES: We will consider all comments that we receive on or before
February 17, 2005.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods:
EDOCKET: Go to http://www.epa.gov/feddocket to submit or

view public comments, access the index listing of the contents of the
official public docket, and to access those documents in the public
docket that are available electronically. Once you have entered
EDOCKET, click on the ``View Open APHIS Dockets'' link to locate this
document.
Postal Mail/Commercial Delivery: Please send four copies
of your comment (an original and three copies) to Docket No. 03-080-5,
Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD,

[[Page 3184]]

APHIS, Station 3C71, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-
1238. Please state that your comment refers to Docket No. 03-080-5.
E-mail: Address your comment to
regulations@aphis.usda.gov . Your comment must be contained in the body

of your message; do not send attached files. Please include your name
and address in your message and ``Docket No. 03-080-5'' on the subject
line.
Reading Room: You may read any comments that we receive on the
environmental assessment in our reading room. The reading room is
located in room 1141 of the USDA South Building, 14th Street and
Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC. Normal reading room hours are
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. To be sure
someone is there to help you, please call (202) 690-2817 before coming.
Other Information: You may view APHIS documents published in the
Federal Register and related information, including the names of groups
and individuals who have commented on APHIS dockets, on the Internet at
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppd/rad/webrepor.html .


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Karen James-Preston, Director,
Technical Trade Services, National Center for Import and Export, VS,
APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231; (301) 734-
4356.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

On January 4, 2005, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
(APHIS) published in the Federal Register (70 FR 460-553, Docket No.
03-080-3) a final rule to amend the regulations regarding the
importation of animals and animal products to recognize a category of
regions that present a minimal risk of introducing bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE) into the United States via live ruminants and
ruminant products, and to add Canada to this category. The final rule
also provides for the importation of certain live ruminants and
ruminant products and byproducts from such regions under certain
conditions.
Also in the January 4, 2005, issue of the Federal Register, we
published a notice (70 FR 554, Docket No. 03-080-4) announcing the
availability of, and requesting comments on, a final environmental
assessment (EA) regarding the potential impact on the quality of the
human environment due to the importation of ruminants and ruminant
products and byproducts from Canada under the conditions specified in
the final rule. APHIS' review and analysis of the potential
environmental impacts associated with those importations were
documented in the EA, titled ``Rulemaking to Establish Criteria for the
Importation of Designated Ruminants and Ruminant Products from Canada
into the United States, Final Environmental Assessment (December
2004).'' We announced that the EA would be available to the public for
review and comment until February 3, 2005.
We have become aware, however, that the version of the EA that was
made available on January 4, 2005, contained some transcription errors
that resulted in the omission of several references to an updated APHIS
risk analysis regarding the final rule, as well as the incorrect
formatting of several source citations. We have corrected those errors.
We are giving notice that the corrected version of the EA is
available to the public for review and comment, and we are extending
the comment period on the EA until February 17, 2005.
The EA may be viewed on the EDOCKET Web site (see ADDRESSES above
for instructions for accessing EDOCKET) or on the APHIS Web site at
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse.html . You may request

paper copies of the EA by calling or writing to the person listed under
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Please refer to the title of the EA
when requesting copies. The EA is also available for review in our
reading room (information on the location and hours of the reading room
is provided under the heading ADDRESSES at the beginning of this
notice).
The EA has been prepared in accordance with: (1) The National
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et
seq.), (2) regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality for
implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500-
1508), (3) USDA regulations implementing NEPA (7 CFR part 1), and (4)
APHIS' NEPA Implementing Procedures (7 CFR part 372).

Done in Washington, DC, this 18th day of January 2005.
W. Ron DeHaven,
Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
[FR Doc. 05-1202 Filed 1-19-05; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 3410-34-P

http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20051800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/05-1202.htm

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)

Publication date: 20 August 2004

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

* 167 kB Report

* 105 kB Summary

Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working
Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission
(EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United
States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more
cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in
USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004
based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached
domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in
the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and
therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is
possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached
domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle
imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were
processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This
risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90s when
domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the
low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with
continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or
pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no
significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains
extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently
increases.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html

USA BSE GBR RAISED TO BSE GBR III

Working Group Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR

III) of USA 2004 ''extremely/very unstable BSE/cattle system''

USA

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/574/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_annex_en1.pdf>

CANADA

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/563/sr02_biohaz02_canada_report_annex_en1.pdf

MEXICO

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/566/sr04_biohaz02_mexico_report_annex_en1.pdf

Canada and the United States have been raised to level III (presence of
BSE likely but not confirmed, or confirmed at a lower level) following a
new assessment taking into account the most recent evidence. EFSAs
Scientific Expert Working Group on geographic BSE risk assessment also
evaluated the status of Mexico and South Africa which were classified as
level III.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/press_room/press_release/575_en.html

European Food Safety Authority

20 August 2004

PRESS RELEASE

EFSA publishes Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR) assessments for

Australia, Canada, Mexico, Norway, South Africa, Sweden

and the United States of America

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has issued today seven up-to-date

scientific reports on the Geographical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE)

Risk (GBR) assessments for Australia, Canada, Mexico, Norway, South Africa

Sweden and the United States of America. While Australias GBR level I (i.e.

presence of BSE in domestic cattle is highly unlikely) is maintained,
that of Norway

has been raised to level II (presence of BSE unlikely but not excluded),
Sweden

remains at GBR level II and those of Canada and the United States have
been raised

to level III (presence of BSE likely but not confirmed, or confirmed at
a lower level)

following a new assessment taking into account the most recent
evidence. EFSAs

Scientific Expert Working Group on geographic BSE risk assessment also
evaluated

the status of Mexico and South Africa which were classified as level III.

In 2003 EFSA was requested by the European Commission (EC) to re-assess the

Geographical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) risk (GBR) for 13
countries:

Australia, Botswana, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Nicaragua,
Namibia, Norway,

Mexico, Panama, Swaziland, Sweden and the United States. Although the
European

Commission did not specifically seek advice from EFSA relating to the
appearance of

BSE in South Africa, the working group decided to carry out a risk
assessment for this

country under a self-tasking mandate in order to allow for a meaningful
evaluation of the

three other countries in the Southern African Region for which a GBR
assessment was

requested (i.e. Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland). EFSAs Scientific Expert
Working

Group on the Assessment of the GBR has completed to date those
assessments relating to

Australia, Canada, Mexico, Norway, South Africa, Sweden and the United
States of

America. The GBR assessments for the remaining countries will be
finalized by the end

of 2004.

In conducting the GBR assessments, EFSAs GBR working group followed the

methodology developed by the former Scientific Steering Committee of DG
Health and

Consumer Safety (DG SANCO) of the European Commission which is described
in its

final opinion on GBR assessment1. The risk assessments published today
are based on

up-to-date data provided by the countries concerned as well as other
sources of data (i.e.

Eurostat and country export data) covering the period of 1980 to 2003.

A detailed analysis for each country is presented in the Scientific
Reports which can be

found at:

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/catindex_en.html

For media enquiries, please contact:

Carola Sondermann, Senior Press Officer

Tel: +32 2 337 2294

Carola.Sondermann@efsa.eu.int

Or EFSA Communications Director, Anne-Laure Gassin

Tel: +32 2 337 2248

Anne-Laure.Gassin@efsa.eu.int

For more background information about the European Food Safety
Authority, go to:

http://www.efsa.eu.int/

Notes to editors

1. The Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR) is a qualitative indicator of the
likelihood of the

presence of one or more cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically
as well as

1 Final opinion on the Geographical Risk of Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (GBR) (Adopted on 6

July 2000). http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out113_en.pdf

Updated opinion on the Geographical Risk of Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (GBR) (adopted on 11

January 2002). http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out243_en.pdf

clinically, at a given point in time, in a country. Where its presence
is confirmed, the

GBR gives an indication of the level of infection.

2. The GBR assessments are based on information submitted by countries
concerned in

response to a European Commission recommendation in 1998 setting out the
information

requirements for such an assessment.2 The information concerns in
particular imports of

bovines and meat and bone meal (MBM) from the United Kingdom and other
BSE-risk

countries, rendering standards for animal by-products, use of so called
Specified Risk

Materials (SRMs), feeding of MBM to ruminants etcetera.

3. The table below shows the current GBR levels of the seven countries
assessed by

EFSA so far, as well as their former classification where available.

GBR

level

Presence of one or more cattle clinically or

pre-clinically infected with the BSE agent in

a geographical region/country

GBR of the country/Region

Current status

(status before)

I Highly unlikely

Australia (I)

II Unlikely but not excluded

Norway (I), Sweden (II)

III Likely but not confirmed or confirmed at a

lower level

Canada (II), Mexico (N/A),

South Africa (N/A), USA (II)

IV Confirmed at a higher level

N/A= not applicable, i.e. not assessed before

2 Preliminary-opinion on a method to assess the geographical BSE-Risk of
Countries or Regions (adopted

on 10 December 1998). http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out35_en.html

http://www.efsa.eu.int/press_room/press_release/575/pr_biohaz02_gbr_en1.pdf

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)

Publication date: 20 August 2004

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

* 167 kB Report

* 105 kB Summary

Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working
Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission
(EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United
States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more
cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in
USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004
based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached
domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in
the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and
therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is
possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached
domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle
imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were
processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This
risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90s when
domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the
low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with
continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or
pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no
significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains
extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently
increases.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html

SUMMARY

javascript:popwindow('http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_summary_en1.pdf',750,480,1,0,1,0,0,1,1,0)

REPORT USA

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_v2_en1.pdf

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/scr_annexes/574/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_annex_en1.pdf

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of Australia

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of Canada

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of Mexico

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of Norway

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of South Africa

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-074)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of Sweden

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

[20 August 2004]

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/catindex_en.html

ONE YEAR PREVIOUSLY ;

From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder@wt.net]

Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2003 1:03 PM

To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov

Cc: ggraber@cvm.fda.gov; Linda.Grassie@fda.gov; BSE-L

Subject: Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION

TO DOCKET 2003N-0312]

Greetings FDA,

snip...

PLUS, if the USA continues to flagrantly ignore the _documented_ science
to date about the known TSEs in the USA (let alone the undocumented TSEs
in cattle), it is my opinion, every other Country that is dealing with
BSE/TSE should boycott the USA and demand that the SSC reclassify the
USA BSE GBR II risk assessment to BSE/TSE GBR III 'IMMEDIATELY'. for the
SSC to _flounder_ any longer on this issue, should also be regarded with
great suspicion as well. NOT to leave out the OIE and it's terribly
flawed system of disease surveillance. the OIE should make a move on CWD
in the USA, and make a risk assessment on this as a threat to human
health. the OIE should also change the mathematical formula for testing
of disease. this (in my opinion and others) is terribly flawed as well.
to think that a sample survey of 400 or so cattle in a population of 100
million, to think this will find anything, especially after seeing how
many TSE tests it took Italy and other Countries to find 1 case of BSE
(1 million rapid TSE test in less than 2 years, to find 102 BSE cases),
should be proof enough to make drastic changes of this system. the OIE
criteria for BSE Country classification and it's interpretation is very
problematic. a text that is suppose to give guidelines, but is not
understandable, cannot be considered satisfactory. the OIE told me 2
years ago that they were concerned with CWD, but said any changes might
take years. well, two years have come and gone, and no change in
relations with CWD as a human health risk. if we wait for politics and
science to finally make this connection, we very well may die before any
decisions

or changes are made. this is not acceptable. we must take the politics
and the industry out of any final decisions of the Scientific community.
this has been the problem from day one with this environmental man made
death sentence. some of you may think i am exaggerating, but you only
have to see it once, you only have to watch a loved one die from this
one time, and you will never forget, OR forgive...yes, i am still very
angry... but the transmission studies DO NOT lie, only the politicians
and the industry do... and they are still lying to this day...TSS

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. BOX 42 Bacliff, TEXAS USA

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: