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From: TSS (216-119-143-156.ipset23.wt.net)
Subject: Re: MAD COW BSE NORTH AMERICA 'CANADIAN UPDATE' (as of January 18, 2005 - 16:00 EST)
Date: January 18, 2005 at 3:44 pm PST

In Reply to: MAD COW BSE NORTH AMERICA 'CANADIAN UPDATE' (as of January 18, 2005 - 16:00 EST) posted by Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on January 18, 2005 at 3:09 pm:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: MAD COW BSE NORTH AMERICA 'CANADIAN UPDATE' (as of January 18, 2005 - 16:00 EST)
Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2005 17:44:26 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE
References: <41ED980C.4050801@wt.net>


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Greetings list members,

> The CFIA has determined that the infected animal's most
> recently born offspring are no longer alive. The two animals
> died of causes unrelated to BSE. This finding concludes the
> offspring component of the investigation.


ooops !

so, this concludes the investigation of the offspring. RIGHT!

what about, whom consumed what???

were they nice fillets, animal feed, or what ???

this reminds me ;

NOTICE: A photo for this and other news stories, streaming audio and video, and
digital photos for your use are available at http://agnews.tamu.edu/

Jan. 18, 2005
TEXAS OFFICIAL: ANIMAL ID SYSTEM WOULD HELP GET AHEAD OF THREATENING DISEASES
Writer: Blair Fannin, (979) 845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu

WACO  A state animal health official said Tuesday that a national
animal identification program will help the livestock industry stay ahead
of threatening diseases that could impact farms nationwide.
"It (the identification system) enables us to protect animal health in
our country as best as we possibly can," Dr. Bob Hillman, executive
director of the Texas Animal Health Commission, told beef producers at the
43rd Blackland Income Growth Conference.
Though a mandatory animal identification program has yet to be
established, premises identification numbers are already being issued by
the animal health commission on a voluntary basis.
Premises identification numbers are being assigned to farms, ranches,
feedlots, livestock markets and other locations with an address and having
livestock handling facilities.
Producers can go to the Web at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us and sign up
electronically, or call 800-550-8242.
Approximately 200 premises identification numbers have already been
issued statewide, Hillman said. However, electronic ear tags, database
infrastructure and other aspects of the system are still in development,
hinging on the amount of federal money allocated for the system.
Electronic ear tags could be ready for distribution to those with
premises identification numbers by mid-year, Hillman said. It's
anticipated by 2006 that mandatory premises identification will be be
enforced and "realistically 2008" before required participation in the
animal identification program is implemented, he noted.
If an outbreak of the highly contagious foot-and-mouth disease were to
hit the United States' beef industry, Hillman said, the identification
program would allow animal health officials "to get ahead of the disease."
"We've got to have that ability," he said. The goal of the national
identification system, in cases such as foot-and mouth disease, he
explained, is to identify within 48 hours any suspect animals and all
places they have been.
Consumer confidence and strengthening food safety are other advantages
the program would bring, he noted.
The Blackland Income Growth Conference continues Wednesday with
pesticide recertification training, Texas Beef Quality Producer Level I
and II training, and a workshop on entrepreneurship and agricultural
diversification.


-30-
ANSC TOP

PTEXT:Jan1805a.txt
PHTML:Jan1805a.htm

not a bad idea.....

TSS


Terry S. Singeltary Sr. wrote:

> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
> #####################
>
> Canadian Food Inspection Agency
> BSE in North America
>
>
> Latest Information
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 18, 2005 - 16:00 EST)
>
> * Case 3 (Confirmed January 11, 2005)
> o The guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health
> recommend that BSE investigations include an infected
> animal's most recently born offspring, based on the
> theoretical possibility of maternal transmission.
> o The CFIA has determined that the infected animal's most
> recently born offspring are no longer alive. The two animals
> died of causes unrelated to BSE. This finding concludes the
> offspring component of the investigation.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 17, 2005 - 14:00 EST)
>
> * Case 2 (Confirmed January 2, 2005)
> o
>
> Further investigation of the birth cohort has determined
> that an additional two animals were exported to the United
> States. This brings the total number of exported birth
> cohort animals to six. American authorities have been notified.
>
> * Case 3 (Confirmed January 11, 2005)
> o
>
> The CFIA is pursuing multiple lines of inquiry to
> investigate the use, sale and production of feeds. Given the
> timeframe of interest, it may not be possible to draw any
> definitive links between a particular feed and the origin of
> infection.
>
> *
>
> CFIA officials are finalizing the details of Canada's feed ban
> review. The review is tentatively scheduled to begin later this
> week. Officials from the United States will arrive in Canada on
> January 24, 2005, to begin their examination of the feed ban.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 14, 2005 - 12:00 EST)
>
> * Case 2 (Confirmed January 2, 2005)
> o Based on records of feed purchases and use, the CFIA has
> confirmed that the infected animal, born in 1996, was
> exposed to feed rations containing meat and bone meal.
> o
>
> This feed was produced before the 1997 feed ban, when the
> inclusion of meat and bone meal in ruminant feeds was
> allowed. This finding concludes the feed component of the
> investigation.
>
> * Case 3 (Confirmed January 11, 2005)
> o An additional 15 cattle from the infected animal's birth
> cohort have been identified and placed under individual
> animal quarantines. All live animals from the birth cohort,
> currently 37 cattle, will be tested.
> o
>
> Investigators are collecting information pertaining to feed
> used on the farm of origin. The CFIA is tracing records from
> the farm of origin and investigating feed retailers and
> manufacturers.
>
> *
>
> CFIA officials expect to release the details of a review of
> Canada's feed ban next week. International animal health and feed
> experts are expected to participate in the review.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 12, 2005 - 15:00 EST)
>
> * Case 2 (Confirmed January 2, 2005)
> o Nine animals from Case 2's birth cohort have been euthanized
> and tested negative for BSE.
> o
>
> Ongoing traceouts have confirmed that an additional three
> birth cohort animals were exported to the United States.
> American authorities have been notified.
>
> * Case 3 (Confirmed January 11, 2005)
> o
>
> Based on current information, we have identified 22 cattle
> from Case 3's birth cohort. Additional traceouts are underway
>
> *
>
> CFIA officials are preparing to undertake a review of Canada's
> feed ban. This process will examine the effectiveness of
> industry's compliance with the ban in limiting the spread of BSE.
> The review will include participation from international animal
> health and feed experts.
>
> * An extensive international outreach campaign is underway to
> reinforce awareness and understanding of the science-based
> measures Canada has in place to protect human and animal health
> from BSE.
> o Canadian officials have been dispatched to China and will be
> travelling to Hong Kong, Japan and Taiwan over the coming week.
> o Canada's Chief Veterinary Officer is currently in Washington
> for technical discussions with USDA and FDA officials.
> o Minister Mitchell will travel to Mexico next week and the
> United States soon after to meet with his counterparts.
> o Heads of Missions will be fully briefed this week so they
> can serve as effective advocates of Canada's BSE safeguards.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 11, 2005 - 14:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) today announced that
> Canada's national surveillance program has detected bovine
> spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in an Alberta beef cow
>
>
> just under seven years of age. As part of its surveillance
> program, the CFIA has control of the carcass. No part of the
> animal has entered the human food or animal feed systems.
>
> *
>
> The CFIA is investigating what the animal may have been fed early
> in its life and the source of the feed. The infected animal was
> born in March 1998, and the farm of origin has been confirmed.
> Based on preliminary information, feed produced prior to the
> introduction of the 1997 feed ban in Canada remains the most
> likely source of infection in this animal.
>
> *
>
> This current investigation is independent of the BSE investigation
> on the case which was confirmed on January 2, 2005.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 7, 2005 - 15:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) investigation has
> gathered a significant amount of information about other animals
> of potential interest. The investigation is ongoing and the
> numbers mentioned are based on currently available information.
>
> *
>
> The infected animal last gave birth in 2003 and 2004. Both calves
> have died of causes unrelated to BSE. This finding concludes the
> offspring component of our investigation.
>
> *
>
> The investigation has also determined that the birth cohort -
> animals born on the farm of origin within 12 months before and
> after the infected animal - includes 38 cattle of primary
> interest. It is possible that these animals could have been
> exposed to the same feed as the infected animal. Finding multiple
> cases of BSE in a single birth cohort is rare, based on
> international experiences. No additional cases were uncovered
> during Canada's two previous investigations.
>
> *
>
> Of the 38 animals, 1 previously tested negative through the
> national surveillance program after being reported as a downer. We
> have located 9 more animals from this group. These animals have
> been placed under individual animal quarantines.
>
> *
>
> We are continuing to investigate the locations and status of the
> remaining animals. Given the age of the infected animal, it is
> likely that some of the animals from the birth cohort are no
> longer alive. We expect to begin euthanizing animals from the
> birth cohort during the week of January 10.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 3, 2005 - 10:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The United States continues to consider Canada as a minimal risk
> region. As stated in the United States Department of Agriculture
> press release of January 3, 2005
> ,
>
> the United States would not alter the implementation of its rule
> to resume trade with Canada.
>
> o
>
> Statement by Ron DeHaven, Administrator, Animal and Plant
> Health Inspection Service
>
>
> (English Only)
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of January 2, 2005 - 19:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) today confirmed
>
>
> that an older dairy cow from Alberta has tested positive for
> bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). No part of the animal
> entered the human food or animal feed systems.
>
> *
>
> The CFIA is continuing its investigation and has determined the
> infected animal's farm of origin. Efforts are now underway to
> identify any other animals of similar risk. Specifically, the
> Agency is focusing on two categories of animals: recently born
> offspring of the infected animal and cattle born on the same farm
> within a year of the infected animal
>
> *
>
> The Agency has also launched a feed investigation to examine what
> the infected animal was fed early in its life, when infection was
> most likely to have occurred prior to the 1997 feed ban.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of December 31, 2004 - 14:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> Consistent with our testing protocol, we are now conducting
> confirmatory testing using the OIE "gold standard" test for BSE .
> Confirmatory testing was initiated on December 30 and results are
> expected in two to four days.
>
> *
>
> The suspect animal's farm of origin has been determined through
> the CFIA's investigation. While earlier information suggested the
> suspect animal might be ten years old, it has now been confirmed
> that the cow was eight years old.
>
> *
>
> Similar to the two North American BSE -infected animals detected
> in 2003, this animal was born before the Canadian and American
> feed bans were introduced in 1997.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of December 30, 2004 - 02:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> Preliminary BSE testing results completed late on December 29,
> 2004 have identified a suspect 10-year-old dairy cow. Although the
> finding is not definitive, multiple screening tests have yielded
> positive results.
>
> *
>
> No part of the animal entered the human food or animal feed
> systems. Samples are currently being analyzed at the Canadian
> Science Centre for Human and Animal Health in Winnipeg.
> Confirmatory results are expected in three to five days.
>
> *
>
> The Government of Canada's normal policy is to report only
> confirmed results. However, given the unique situation created by
> the United States' border announcement on December 29 it was
> decided that the most prudent action would be to publicly announce
>
>
> the available information and provide stakeholders with a full
> understanding of the current situation.
>
> *
>
> The United States Office of the Management and Budget (OMB ) has
> completed its review of the proposed rule on Bovine Spongiform
> Encephalopathy (BSE ) and returned it to the United States
> Department of Agriculture (USDA) for publication in the Federal
> Register.
>
> *
>
> The USDA said Wednesday that the final rule will be published in
> the January 4 Federal Register
>
> and will take effect March 7, 2005.
>
> *
>
> When implemented, the rule will provide access to the U.S. for a
> range of live animals and beef and ruminant products. In
> particular, the rule will once again allow for the importation
> into the U.S. of live cattle under 30 months for immediate
> slaughter or for feeding, provided they are slaughtered before
> reaching the age of 30 months. The rule also allows for the
> importation of meat from animals older than 30 months and removes
> segregation requirements at Canadian slaughter facilities.
>
> o
>
> Rule to Establish Minimal-Risk Regions for Bovine Spongiform
> Encephalopathy
>
> United States Department of Agriculture (English Only)
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of December 14, 2004 - 14:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The Government of Canada today announced that Cuba has agreed to
> re-open its border
>
>
> to a broad range of Canadian beef products.
>
> *
>
> Effective immediately, Cuba will accept Canadian beef and beef
> products from cattle of any age with minor exceptions, such as
> mechanically separated meat, vertebral column, trimmings, and
> tissues derived from the head.
>
> *
>
> Cuba has also agreed to accept Canadian pet food that does not
> contain meat and bone meal of ruminant origin. Building on this
> agreement, Canadian and Cuban officials hope to agree shortly on
> certification requirements that would permit the importation of
> live Canadian cattle.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Latest Information (as of December 10, 2004 - 14:00 EST)
>
> *
>
> The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has proposed amendments
>
>
> to federal regulations that will strengthen existing animal feed
> controls.
>
> *
>
> The proposed amendments prohibit the use of specified risk
> material (SRM) in animal feeds, including pet food.
>
> *
>
> The proposed regulations have been placed in the Canada Gazette
> Part 1. A 75-day comment period ending February 24, 2005 is being
> provided to give regulated industries, trading partners and other
> interested parties the opportunity to review the proposed
> amendments and provide the CFIA with written comments.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> snip...
> http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/disemala/bseesb/situatione.shtml
>
> TSS
>
> ######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html
> ##########
>
>

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########






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