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From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. (216-119-144-66.ipset24.wt.net)
Subject: Re: CANADA DISCOVERS NEW CASE OF MAD COW DISEASE TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2005
Date: January 11, 2005 at 10:12 am PST

In Reply to: CANADA DISCOVERS NEW CASE OF MAD COW DISEASE TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2005 posted by Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on January 11, 2005 at 9:51 am:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: Canada Discovers New Case of Mad Cow Tuesday, January 11, 2005
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005 12:15:55 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy , CJDVoice
CC: Yves Le Pape
References: <41E4118C.7060009@wt.net>


Canada Finds New Case of Mad Cow Disease
January 11, 2005 12:49:00 PM ET

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian veterinary officials will announce they have
found a new case of mad cow disease in a briefing slated for 2 p.m. EST
(1900 GMT), an agricultural source told Reuters on Tuesday.

``The case is confirmed. They have the results of the 'gold standard'
test,'' the source told Reuters, referring to the definitive laboratory
test used to confirm mad cow disease.

The case would be Canada's third home-grown incidence of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease.

No other details were immediately available on the case.

It comes as the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed signs it is
looking to withdraw its plan to allow imports of young live cattle from
Canada.

The trade ban has depressed Canadian prices and crippled ranches and
feedlots. Cattle farmers have lost an estimated C$5 billion ($4.1
billion) since the first home-grown case was found in May 2003.

The USDA had announced plans to restart trade on March 7, after it
learned about Canada's second case of the disease, which was confirmed
on Jan. 2.

U.S. cattle farmers have said in recent days they thought the plan
should be delayed.

A U.S. industry source said the USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service was reconsidering the move on Tuesday.

``Career folks at APHIS are saying they are going to kill the rule,''
the industry source said.

A USDA spokesman declined comment.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said last week it would test nine
old cattle related to the Jan. 2 case of mad cow disease.

Until 2003, North America had been considered free of the brain-wasting
livestock disease, which has ravaged the cattle industry in Britain and
other European countries.

Humans can contract a form of the disease from eating contaminated meat
-- variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- and more than 100 people around
the world have died from it, mainly in Europe.

The United States reported its first case of mad cow disease in December
2003, but traced it to a Canadian-born dairy cow.

All three North American cases were born before 1997 feed rules designed
to prevent the spread of mad cow disease.

Canadian officials have warned they expected to find a few more cases of
the disease as they dramatically increased tests of old and sick cattle.

Last year, the CFIA tested more than 23,500 cattle for the disease.

($1-$1.22 Canadian) (Additional reporting by Charles Abbott in
Charlotte, N.C., Randy Fabi in Washington and Roberta Rampton in Winnipeg)

© 2005 Reuters
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/breaking/breakingnewsarticle.asp?feed=OBR&Date=20050111&ID=4182250

TTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian veterinary officials will announce they have
found a new case of mad cow disease in a briefing slated for 2 p.m. EST
(1900 GMT), an agricultural source told Reuters on Tuesday.

"The case is confirmed. They have the results of the 'gold standard'
test," the source told Reuters, referring to the definitive laboratory
test used to confirm mad cow disease.

The case would be Canada's third home-grown incidence of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease.

No other details were immediately available on the case.

It comes as the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed signs it is
looking to withdraw its plan to allow imports of young live cattle from
Canada.

The trade ban has depressed Canadian prices and crippled ranches and
feedlots. Cattle farmers have lost an estimated C$5 billion ($4.1
billion) since the first home-grown case was found in May 2003.

The USDA had announced plans to restart trade on March 7, after it
learned about Canada's second case of the disease, which was confirmed
on Jan. 2.

U.S. cattle farmers have said in recent days they thought the plan
should be delayed.

A U.S. industry source said the USDA's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service was reconsidering the move on Tuesday.

"Career folks at APHIS are saying they are going to kill the rule," the
industry source said.

A USDA spokesman declined comment. Continued ...


The Canadian Food Inspection Agency said last week it would test nine
old cattle related to the Jan. 2 case of mad cow disease.

Until 2003, North America had been considered free of the brain-wasting
livestock disease, which has ravaged the cattle industry in Britain and
other European countries.

Humans can contract a form of the disease from eating contaminated meat
-- variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- and more than 100 people around
the world have died from it, mainly in Europe.

The United States reported its first case of mad cow disease in December
2003, but traced it to a Canadian-born dairy cow.

All three North American cases were born before 1997 feed rules designed
to prevent the spread of mad cow disease.

Canadian officials have warned they expected to find a few more cases of
the disease as they dramatically increased tests of old and sick cattle.

Last year, the CFIA tested more than 23,500 cattle for the disease.

($1=$1.22 Canadian) (Additional reporting by Charles Abbott in
Charlotte, N.C., Randy Fabi in Washington and Roberta Rampton in Winnipeg)

© Reuters 2005. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=businessNews&storyID=7295004
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=PWITDC12UIJVQCRBAEKSFFA?type=businessNews&storyID=7295004&pageNumber=1

TSS


Terry S. Singeltary Sr. wrote:

> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
> #####################
>
> Canada Discovers New Case of Mad Cow -- Source
>
>
>
>
>
> Tuesday, January 11, 2005 12:24:39 PM ET
>
> OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada will announce on Tuesday that it has
> discovered a new case of mad cow disease, an agricultural source said.
>
> "The case is confirmed. They have the results of the gold standard
> test," the source told Reuters, referring to the definitive laboratory
> test used to confirm mad cow disease.
>
> Separately, a government official said the Canadian Food Inspection
> Agency was due to hold a briefing on mad cow disease at 2 p.m. (1900
> GMT).
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> © Reuters 2005. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution
> of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is
> expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters.
> Reuters and the Reuters sphere logo are registered trademarks and
> trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world.
>
> http://www.metronews.ca/reuters_national.asp?id=50172
>
> TSS
>
> ######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html
> ##########
>
>






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