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From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. (216-119-132-100.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Statement By Dr. Ron DeHaven Administrator, Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (BSE cohort was imported into the USA)
Date: January 7, 2005 at 3:33 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [liste esb] Statement By Dr. Ron DeHaven Administrator, Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service (BSE cohort was imported into the United States in February 2002)
Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:35:32 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
CC: CJDVoice , esb

Statement By Dr. Ron DeHaven Administrator, Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service

January 7, 2005

"The U.S. Department of Agriculture is working closely with the Canadian
Food Inspection Agency in their investigation of the Canadian dairy cow
that recently tested positive for BSE. This investigation is focused on
identifying birth cohorts - animals born in the same herd within one
year of the affected animal. The preliminary investigation has shown
that one of these birth cohorts was imported into the United States in
February 2002 for immediate slaughter. USDA, in collaboration with FDA,
is currently tracing the disposition of this animal and will provide
further details as the investigation evolves.

"Even at the height of BSE infection in Europe and the United Kingdom,
it was extremely rare to have more than one animal in the same herd
affected with BSE, therefore USDA believes it is extremely unlikely that
this imported cow would have been infected. Nevertheless, as was the
case in May 2003, when Canada had its first case of BSE and a small
number of birth cohorts were traced to the United States, USDA will make
every reasonable effort to obtain and provide information about the
disposition of this animal as well as any other birth cohorts that are
traced to the United States through Canada's epidemiological investigation.

"USDA and FDA have had a strong program in place for years to protect
the U.S. livestock population from BSE. Import controls on live cattle
and certain ruminant products from countries at high risk of BSE were
put in place more than 15 years ago. In 1997, both the United States and
Canada finalized animal feed bans, which are the single most important
safeguard to prevent the spread of the disease through the cattle
population. Public and animal health in the United States and Canada
have also been protected through ongoing surveillance efforts and
inspection of animals at slaughter for neurological signs, and now by
the removal of specified risk materials from the human food supply.

"USDA also continues the enhanced BSE surveillance program that began in
June 2003. To date, more than 170,000 targeted animals have been tested
for BSE. All samples have been negative."


http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid=2005/01/0007.xml

TSS





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