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From: TSS (216-119-132-100.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Re: BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY IN CANADA OIE Emergency report
Date: January 7, 2005 at 11:55 am PST

In Reply to: BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY IN CANADA OIE Emergency report posted by Terry S. Singeltary Sr. on January 7, 2005 at 11:36 am:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Infected cow ate feed made of cattle remains
Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 16:56:41 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Web Posted Jan 6 2005 02:11 PM MST

Infected cow ate feed made of cattle remains

Edmonton - Investigators have confirmed that the latest cow infected
with mad cow disease ate feed containing the remains of other ruminants.


Alberta's chief veterinarian, Dr. Gerald Ollis, says the confirmation
fits with the widely accepted belief about how bovine spongiform
encephalopathy is contracted.

The cow was born in October 1996, before Canada placed a ban on feeding
cattle remains to other cattle. Canada's only other case of BSE was in
an animal also born before the feed ban came into effect, as was a
Canadian-born cow that tested positive in the U.S. "If we had a
situation where this cow had never been exposed to meat meal in its
entire life, and you could prove that, that would cause some concern
about how it had become infected. The fact that meat meal has now been
determined to have been in the diet of that animal within its first six
months of age, just confirms the current theory on the spread of BSE,"
Ollis said. Cattle eating the remains of other infected cattle is the
most common way the disease is spread. Ollis says investigators can now
narrow their search into the causes of the latest case. The Barrhead
man, on whose farm the downer cow was found, kept careful records that
enabled officials to trace the cow's life-long diet. "It's difficult in
many cases to know exactly where feeds came from, because records aren't
always maintained, so it's very fortunate in this situation where
they've got sufficient records to be able to say this cow was exposed to
meat meal. It was part of the ration that cow was provided within its
first six months of life," Ollis said. Agriculture officials had
suspected that the cow that tested positive for BSE on Sunday had
contracted the fatal disease from eating contaminated feed.

http://edmonton.cbc.ca/regionalnews/caches/ed-mad-cow20050106.html
TSS

######### https://listserv.kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/bse-l.html ##########





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