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From: TSS (216-119-143-160.ipset23.wt.net)
Subject: Opinion of the European Food Safety Authority on BSE risk from dissemination of brain particles in blood and carcass following stunning
Date: December 10, 2004 at 1:54 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Opinion of the European Food Safety Authority on BSE risk from dissemination of brain particles in blood and carcass following stunning
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2004 10:37:13 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Opinion of the European Food Safety Authority on BSE risk from
dissemination of brain particles in blood and carcass following stunning
Last updated: 07 December 2004

Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-122

* 138 kB Opinion

* 95 kB Summary


Summary

The European Commission (EC) requested the European Food Safety
Authority (EFSA) and its Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards for an
update of the latest SSC opinion of 2002 related to the risk of
dissemination of brain particles into the blood and carcass when
applying certain stunning methods.

The Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards concludes that brain damage
caused by both penetrating and non-penetrating captive bolt stunning in
cattle, as well as that caused by penetrating captive bolt stunning in
sheep, can result in occurrence of Central Nervous System (CNS) tissue
emboli in venous blood draining the head. Therefore, the non-penetrating
method currently used cannot be considered as an alternative method to
the penetrating method. It also concluded that following penetrating
captive bolt stunning, the likelihood of CNS tissue embolism is higher
in sheep than in cattle. New data, based on the results of detection
methods currently available, confirm the occurrence of CNS embolism
following penetrating or non-penetrating stunning methods. However,
methods for examination of different tissue/organs for the presence and
quantification of the CNS material have not been optimised. It was also
concluded that analysis of the available data can not confirm either an
association, or the absence of an association, of CNS tissue embolism
with a number of alternative methods, including electrical stunning method.

The Scientific Panel on Biological Hazards recommends that further
studies in particular on modifications of the current captive bolt
stunning methods so as to prevent CNS embolism are required.
Alternatively, the replacement of these methods should be investigated.
In addition, also validation studies on the occurrence of
stunning-associated CNS embolism conducted under commercial conditions
are required. Such studies should focus on the involvement of systemic
arterial circulation in the distribution of CNS emboli. Research should
also focus on optimized methods for the detection and quantification of
stunning-induced dissemination of CNS material to different
organs/tissues and on optimal sampling methods/plans, which can provide
comparable results between various studies.


Publication date: 07 December 2004

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/biohaz/biohaz_opinions/731_fr.html

Greetings,

Tam Garland et al concluded that almost a decade ago;

Garland et al (1996). Brain emboli in the lungs
of cattle after stunning, Lancet 348(9027), p. 610.

Approved-By: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Message-ID: @wt.net>
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 15:16:33 -0500
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Sender: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."


Subject: Re: Stunning and Slaughter Procedures

Hello Everyone, I hate to reply to myself, but SEAC's advice, I thought
was careless. They claim no further action be taken, due to the current
data. So, does that mean it's the end of discussion, no need to look for
further data? It seems, there is data out there, that would dispute
this. I remember reading an article, that was referenced to a Lancet
article, dated Sept. 14, 1996, titled; "Brains emboli in the lungs of
cattle". If I remember correctly, don't quote me on this, the article
spoke of brain tissue in the lung, that had already gone through the
heart, and even possibly in the liver as well. I tried accessing the
article in the Lancet, the title is there (Brains emboli in the lungs of
cattle), but no content. If anyone is aware of this article, or its
contents, maybe they could comment on it......... Thank You, Terry S.
Singeltary Sr., Bacliff, Texas USA

Garland reported only the
finding of brain tissue in the vessels carrying blood from the heart to
the lungs following the use of a stunning device which injects air at
high pressure into the cranium. This device is not used in United
Kingdom abattoirs.

http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/ld199900/ldhansrd/vo000503/text/00503w03.htm

also;

http://www.heynkes.de/gelesen/aelc.htm

Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2001 22:01:30 -0700 Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy Sender: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy From: "Terry S.
Singeltary Sr."

Subject: Carefully Stunning Cows ??? (BURGER KING)

Greetings List Members, Friday, June 29, 2001 Houston Chronicle via New
York Times Burger King draws praise over its new policy to reform
slaughterhouse standards snip... Following in the footsteps of its
larger rival, McDonald's, Burger King said that it would ""begin""
checking the 160 slaughterhouses from which it buys meat to make sure
that all of the animals are carefully stunned before being killed...
snip... how would you carefully stun a cow, from rear end up, blow
brains out ears ??? back to drawing board, Terry S. Singeltary Sr.,
Bacliff, Texas USA


TSS

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