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From: TSS (216-119-132-22.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: HUNKERING DOWN IN THE APHIS BSE SITUATION ROOM 1999
Date: November 25, 2004 at 8:55 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: HUNKERING DOWN IN THE APHIS BSE SITUATION ROOM 1999
Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 10:19:50 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@LISTSERV.KALIV.UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Greetings,

i know some on this list remembers this thread, but some new members
might have not seen it,
so i thought i might pass it through again...TSS

U.S. Emergency Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Response Plan Summary

* U.S. Emergency Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Response Plan
Summary

(328 lines)
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 18:25:12 -0500
* (part of text of this posted at bottom)


hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

* hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

(102 lines)
From: tom
Date: Wed, 12 May 1999 01:55:54 -0800

Date: Wed, 12 May 1999 01:55:54 -0800
Reply-To: BSE-L
Sender: BSE-L
From: tom
Subject: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

i am looking now a bizarre Oct 98 internal USDA publication describing a
james bond-type US effort to control media should the long-anticipated
first case of BSE in the US be admitted. 'Players' on the 27 member BSE
Response Team are to be flown in from all over the country to a BSE
Headquarters 'situation room' apparently an underground bunker in
Riverdale, Maryland under the command of the Assistant Secretary of
Marketing. Authentic press releases are already prepared and ready to go
out after a few specifics have been filled in. They are spelled out in a
separate document, the BSE Red Book, aka BSE Emergency Disease
Guidelines. Aphis' National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL)
activates team assembly. From the time a bovine brain sample is
submitted, it takes 14-18 days to confirm a diagnosis of BSE. In the
first 10-13 days, NVSL have enough information to determine the need for
additional tests. If a provisional BSE diagnosis is made, the sample is
'hand-carried' (are they going to tell the airline and customs?) to the
Central Veterinary Laboratory in England for confirmation, where they
are expecting a 24 to 96 hour turn-around. I guess that means we can get
the white tiger brain analyzed by Friday despite the 22 year delay to
date. Maybe we could throw in a few cougar brains from NE Colorado too.
A Team Member is designated to silently monitor this listserve and
www.mad-cow.org (among others) -- for what, it doesn't say. The Freedom
of Information Act request from the East Coast consumer group turned up
numerous top-secret USDA downloads from that site and Dealler's. After
24 hours of secret briefings for 'select industry and trading partners'
(to allow them to take positions on the commodities markets opposite the
'non-select' industry and trading partners?), a press conference will be
held the next day. There are plans to trace the cow, its lineage, its
herdmates, the renderer, traceout of product, buyout of herd, farm of
origin, to get the state involved to quarantine the herd (pre-arranged
for all 50 states), expectations for trade bans, notification of OIE
within 24 hours, media 800 numbers, spokespersons and backups, notify
CDC, FDA, NIH, and many other commendable activities. The Flow Chart is
a sight to behold, I will try to scan it in tomorrow. In short, that cow
is going to be toast by the time the public first hears about it. The
Plan does not speak to the scenario in which the CVL says, yes, this is
bovine spongiform encephalopathy all right but it is one of your
strains, not ours. Invoking their Absence of Evidence is Evidence of
Absence principle, there may be no perceived need for public disclosure
in this case. USDA is caught completely unprepared if BSE first turns up
in a US zoo animal. These animals could easily be diagnosed outside the
"system" and be the subject of a publicity-seeking lab press release. I
think this is a more likely scenario because the US has likely imported
many thousands of zoo animals with advanced infections from Britain and
France and there has been zero monitoring. Unlike with downer cows,
anyone with the right colleagues can get ahold of a fallen zoo animal.
Zoo animals enter the food chain in some cases after being rendered.
Another scenario would be some stock market speculator obtaining the Red
Book and issuing a flurry of bogus but authentic-looking press releases
that included bogus 800 and hacked USDA web links. The press here is so
lazy and so accustomed to putting out public relation handouts as news
that the objectives would be accomplished for a few hour (or days,
depending on the Response Team's paralysis vis-a-vis off-flow chart
events). Some people think a practise run for this happened in the
Indiana case a year or two back. The first case of nvCJD in an American
will also be a public relations fiasco. In the dim bulb of the public
mind, any American with mad cow disease would have gotten it from eating
meat here. USDA has no way to prove that the victim acquired it on a
three week trip to England in 1987. This will sound lame even to the
press. All CJD is synonymous with mad cow disease in the public
perception; the more often the different kinds are explained, the more
their suspicions are aroused. The first case of nvCJD in an American
will simply validate what they already know and just be viewed as an
overdue admission from the government. tom

------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

(68 lines)
From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
Date: Thu, 6 May 1999 08:07:19 -0500

Date: Thu, 6 May 1999 08:07:19 -0500 Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy BSE-L Sender: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy BSE-L
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

Subject: Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room


Dr. Pringle or Anyone, why is it, in the U.S.'s B.S.E. Response Plan,
the U.S.D.A. refers to it as a FOREIGN ANIMAL DISEASE. With the feeding
and rendering practices of the U.S. over the years, scrapie in the U.S.
for years, (it was proven in the defense of Oprah Winfrey trial that
neurologically ill cattle went to the renderers showed pictures of sheep
heads in 55 gallon drums, along with all kind of road-kill at the
rendering plants.) Why do they call this a Foreign Disease, or a U.K.
disease??? Under the circumstances, could it not happen here, because of
OUR OWN STUPIDITY??? I also find it odd, that the letters, of the
announcement of the first case of BSE, are already drafted and ready to
go, for a disease, they say, can't happen here, because of the EXTENSIVE
B.S.E. program that has been in place for years. Under the present
circumstances, out of the 900 MILLION cattle raised since 1990, and the
examination of ONLY 7,535 brains since 1990, It would have to be a FREAK
ACCIDENT, for the U.S. to ever find a case of B.S.E. I believe, this
could be a WORLD PROBLEM, AND COULD HAPPEN ANYWHERE, where the feeding
and rendering practices were that of the U.K. or U.S.////// Terry S.
Singeltary Sr. Bacliff, Texas, U.S.A.

* Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

(41 lines)
From: Nora E Wineland
Date: Fri, 14 May 1999 08:38:24 -0600

Date: Fri, 14 May 1999 08:38:24 -0600
Reply-To: BSE-L
Sender: BSE-L
From: Nora E Wineland
Subject: Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

I would like to post the following response from one of my colleagues to
one of the recent posts on this list: "The updated BSE Response Plan has
been posted on the APHIS website for months. It was also distributed to
the contact list which includes other government agencies, industry and
consumer groups. I would hardly call it an internal document. I will
only address one of the many misinterpretations in Tom Pringle's
posting: In the event of a BSE case, the person assigned to monitoring
the APHIS BSE website will keep this site up to date on an almost hourly
basis, there is no intention of monitoring the sites of others. If
anyone has questions about the document I can be reached as follows:
Linda A. Detwiler Senior Staff Veterinarian USDA, APHIS, Veterinary
Services 609-259-5825" Regards, Nora Wineland, DVM, MS NAHMS Program
Leader Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health USDA-APHIS-VS


* Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room

(62 lines)
From: tom
Date: Sun, 16 May 1999 21:21:34 -0800

Date: Sun, 16 May 1999 21:21:34 -0800
Reply-To: BSE-L
Sender: BSE-L
From: tom
Subject: Re: hunkering down in the APHIS BSE Situation Room
In-Reply-To: <"990514144119Z.WT11141.

>"The updated BSE Response Plan has been posted on the APHIS website
for months. It was also distributed to the contact list which includes
other government agencies, industry and consumer groups. I would hardly
call it an internal document. I will only address one of the many
misinterpretations in Tom Pringle's posting: In the event of a BSE case,
the person assigned to monitoring the APHIS BSE website will keep this
site up to date on an almost hourly basis, there is no intention of
monitoring the sites of others. If anyone has questions about the
document I can be reached as follows: > >Linda A. Detwiler >Senior Staff
Veterinarian >USDA, APHIS, Veterinary Services >609-259-5825" > Yes, I
had four questions: 1. Could you please post on this listserve or the
APHIS site the contact list of industry and consumer groups? My concern
is that these are not bona fide consumer groups but simply
industry-funded shells. It is important as a tax-supported public agency
for USDA to promote a level informational playing field. 2. How do I go
about getting my name added to this contact list to receive future
messages? 3. Could you please post here a list of the "select industry
and trading partners" that get the one-day advance warning that mad cow
disease has been confirmed in the US? There are many stakeholders in
this issue including public health and consumer interests -- I am hoping
this list will demonstrate balance. Please add my stockbroker to this
list. 4. Could you please post here copies of the press releases that
have been made up in advance of this hypothetical event? The facts are
not in, how it is possible to issue reassurances to the consumer
already? Maybe the actual event won't be all that reassuring. Thanks, Tom

------------------------------------------------------------------------

nothing like the good old days...TSS

>
> IF we look at the original U.S. Emergency Bovine Spongiform
> Encephalopathy Response Plan Summary i posted in 1999,
> it states very clearly;
>
>> If additional tests do suggest a presumptive diagnosis of BSE, an NVSL
>> pathologist will hand carry the sample to the United Kingdom for
>> confirmation. It is at this critical point, when NVSL suggests a
>> diagnosis of BSE and is preparing to send the sample to the United
>> Kingdom, that this BSE Response Plan is initiated. The Plan begins the
>> preliminary notification from NVSL to APHIS...
>
>
>
> snip...end
>
> BUT this administration has clearly shown they have no rules and
> regulations, they change them with the wind to suit there needs$
>
> for full text,
>
> ORIGINAL POSTING;
>
> Subject: U.S. Emergency Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Response Plan
> Summary
> Date: Tue, 4 May 1999 18:25:12 -0500
> From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
> Reply-To: BSE-L
> To: BSE-L
>
> IT'S IN THE ARCHIVES at BSE-L...TSS
>
> Terry S. Singeltary Sr. wrote:
>
> ##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
> #####################
>
> Release No. 0508.04
>
> Statement by John Clifford, Deputy Administrator- Animal & Plant
> Health Inspection Service
>
> November 23, 2004
>
>
> "The USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames,
> Iowa, has determined that the inconclusive screening test sample
> reported on Nov. 18 has tested negative for BSE upon confirmatory
> testing.
> "The Nov. 18 sample is the first that has tested inconclusive under an
> APHIS protocol announced in August that calls for public reporting of
> screening results only after two reactive screens. NVSL used the
> immunohistochemistry (IHC) test, an internationally-recognized gold
> standard test for BSE, and received a negative result on Nov. 22.
> Because the Nov. 18 screening test results were reactive in both the
> first and second screens, NVSL scientists made the recommendation to
> run the IHC test a second time. On Nov. 23 they reported the second
> IHC test was negative. Negative results from both IHC tests makes us
> confident that the animal in question is indeed negative for BSE.
>
> "APHIS began an enhanced surveillance program on June 1 and to date
> has tested over 121,000 samples for BSE. Screening tests are designed
> to be extremely sensitive and false positives are not unexpected.
> APHIS has reported three inconclusives including the Nov. 18 sample
> and all have tested negative on confirmatory testing."
>
>
> #
>
>
> USDA News
> oc.news@usda.gov
> 202 720-4623

############## BSE-L-subscribe-request@kaliv.uni-karlsruhe.de ##############






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