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From: TSS (216-119-132-70.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Re: HEALTH OFFICIALS BLAME HAMBURGER FOR CJD CASE
Date: November 13, 2004 at 8:20 am PST

In Reply to: HEALTH OFFICIALS BLAME HAMBURGER FOR CJD CASE posted by TSS on November 13, 2004 at 8:12 am:

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: CJD 'death bug' now traced to hamburger
Date: Sat, 13 Nov 2004 10:30:05 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: BSE-L
CC: cjdvoice@yahoogroups.com


CJD 'death bug' now traced to hamburger
http://www.unison.ie/

INVESTIGATORS probing the country's first case of the lethal brain
disease vCJD now believe the victim contracted it from eating a hamburger.

An extensive Department of Health investigation is focusing on the meat
products the young man ate up to as much as eight years ago.

The man, who is in his early 20s, is the first known Irish person to
have contracted the disease indigenously. He is currently receiving
treatment at a Dublin hospital after doctors gave him an estimated 13
months to live.

The Irish Independent has learned that, as early as the latter half of
last month, experts treating him had pinpointed the meat he had consumed
as the cause of the disease.

Other causes, such as blood transfusions or any operations, were ruled
out at a very early stage in tests carried out on the man.

The focus of the investigation has been on a "look-back" audit of the
man's diet over some years.

It is understood the primary focus has been on hamburgers he would have
consumed over a number of years. Scientists are continuing to conduct
tests both inside and outside the country to establish as much detail as
possible about the cause of his condition.

Despite suggestions from Department of Agriculture officials that he
contracted it from imported beef, it is understood the source of the
meat has yet to be identified.

Strict controls were implemented by the Government in the mid-1990s over
the consumption of such meat and its importation. However, the Irish
Independent has also learned that foreign meat continues to be imported
illegally into the country, despite rigorous guidelines.

The human form of so-called "mad cow disease", known as variant
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), was identified in 1996.

There is strong evidence that this disease is caused by exposure to BSE
(bovine spongiform encephalopathy), the condition that affects cows.

By the end of 2002, 129 people had developed the disease in Britain.
Because the incubation period is extremely long, there are fears that
there could be a substantial increase in incidence in the future.

Last night Denis Naughten, Fine Gael spokesman on Agriculture, said the
Government must make our food labelling system 100pc watertight.

"I am extremely concerned that the current labelling loopholes have the
potential to erode the strength of consumer confidence in Irish produce,
not least because they allow for the potential of mislabelling and for
non-Irish products to be passed off as Irish."

Policing the meat industry:

Review 9

Sarah Murphy

Health officials blame hamburger for CJD case

Online.ie, Ireland - 6 hours ago
Health officials investigating the country's first case of variant CJD
believe the victim contracted the brain disease from eating a hamburger.
...

Paper claims CJD case has been traced

RTE Interactive, Ireland - 6 hours ago
It is reported in today's Irish Independent newspaper that the source of
Ireland's first case of Variant CJD has been traced to a hamburger. ...

Health officials blame hamburger for CJD case

Ireland Online, Ireland - 6 hours ago
Health officials investigating the country's first case of variant CJD
believe the victim contracted the brain disease from eating a hamburger.
...

Burger link to Irish CJD case

U.TV, UK - 7 hours ago
Fine Gael`s Agriculture spokesperson, Denis Naughton, is calling for
changes to the current labelling system.

Burger link to Irish CJD case

UTV, Ireland - 7 hours ago
Fine Gael`s Agriculture spokesperson, Denis Naughton, is calling for
changes to the current labelling system.TSS





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