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From: TSS (216-119-129-29.ipset9.wt.net)
Subject: Tests confirm vCJD in suspect patient
Date: November 9, 2004 at 6:58 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Tests confirm vCJD in suspect patient
Date: Tue, 09 Nov 2004 21:08:58 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: BSE-L
CC: cjdvoice@yahoogroups.com


Tests confirm vCJD in suspect patient


The results of a specialised test on a young man suspected of having
variant CJD have confirmed he has the fatal brain disease, writes Dr
Muiris Houston, Medical Correspondent.

The Irish Times has learned that a biopsy of one of the patient's
tonsils has shown the presence of prion, the rogue protein known to
cause both vCJD in humans and BSE in cattle. The test results mean the
Republic has now recorded its first case of indigenous vCJD.

Late last month a Dublin hospital said it was treating a man in his
early 20s with suspected vCJD. Last night it said: "The result of a
further test carried out on the young man suspected of having vCJD makes
it most unlikely that the diagnosis pertaining to this patient is
anything other than vCJD".

While there is no definitive blood test to diagnose vCJD, the presence
of prion in immune system tissue in the tonsils, coupled with a
characteristic appearance of the brain on MRI scan, has put the
diagnosis beyond doubt.

The consultant neurologist looking after the patient said his family had
been informed of the results. "They have asked that their privacy be
respected. It has been a very traumatic time for them," he said.

The man may be offered experimental treatment in the future, aimed at
prolonging his survival. vCJD remains a fatal condition, with an average
survival time of 13 months.

Given that the patient has never had surgery or has never given or
received blood, medical sources said it was almost certain the man had
contracted the disease from eating infected beef. However, they rated
the likelihood of the case having consequences for public health as
negligible.

Prof Bill Hall, chairman of the State's CJD advisory group, said: "The
confirmation of the occurrence of vCJD in the Republic is not unexpected".


© The Irish Times

http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/front/2004/1110/1558345091HM1MUIRIS.html

tss






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