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From: TSS (216-119-132-57.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Experimental Transmission of Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral and Oral Routes to Genetically Susceptible Suffolk Sheep in the United States Authors
Date: November 7, 2004 at 6:45 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Experimental Transmission of Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral and Oral Routes to Genetically Susceptible Suffolk Sheep in the United States Authors
Date: Sun, 07 Nov 2004 20:46:46 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: BSE-L , CJDVOICE@YAHOOGROUPS.COM


Research
Research >

Title: Experimental Transmission of Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral and
Oral Routes to Genetically Susceptible Suffolk Sheep in the United
States Authors
item Hamir, Amirali

item Kunkle, Robert - bob

item Richt, Juergen

item Miller, Janice - ARS RETIRED
item Cutlip, Randall - ARS RETIRED
item Jenny, Allen - USDA-VS-APHIS-NVSL


http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=161349tss
Submitted to: Journal Of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2004
Publication Date: N/A
Interpretive Summary: Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal disease of
sheep and goats. It affects nervous system of the animal. Susceptibility
to the disease is dependent upon genetic makeup of the host and
infectious agent. This study documents findings in Suffolk sheep
affected with experimental disease. Four-month-old lambs were utilized
for the study. They were administered (5 in the brain and 19 orally)
scrapie-infected sheep brains. All animals that were administered the
infected material directly into the brain revealed signs of scrapie and
were euthanized between 13'24 months after administration. In sheep
given the material orally, signs of scrapie were seen between 27 and 43
months in 5 of 9 animals. Three of the 4 clinically normal sheep were
found to be positive for scrapie by laboratory tests at 15, 20, and 49
months after administration of infected material. There is lack of
information on experimental transmission of US scrapie agent in
genetically diverse flocks of sheep. This study attempts to partially
fill this void by documenting findings of this disease in Suffolks.
Since similar investigations are also needed for other breeds of sheep
in this country, the present study will serve as a foundation to compare
results of other future studies.

Technical Abstract: Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal
neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. Susceptibility to the
disease is partly dependent upon genetic makeup of the host. This study
documents clinicopathological findings and distribution in tissues of
abnormal prion proteins (PrPres) by immunohistochemical (IHC) and
Western blot (WB) techniques, in tissues of genetically susceptible
sheep inoculated with US sheep scrapie agent. Four-month-old Suffolk
lambs (QQ or HQ at codon 171) were utilized for the study. They were
inoculated (5 intracerebrally and 19 orally) with an inoculum (No. 13-7)
consisting of a pool of scrapie-infected sheep brains. Intracerebrally
inoculated animals were euthanized when advanced clinical signs of
scrapie were observed. Orally inoculated animals were euthanized at
pre-determined time-points (4, 9, 12, 15 and 21 months post inoculation,
PI) and thereafter when the animals had terminal signs of disease. A
detailed postmortem examination was conducted on each carcass and
tissues were examined for microscopic lesions and for the presence of
PrPres by IHC and WB techniques. All intracerebrally inoculated animals
exhibited clinical signs of scrapie and were euthanized between 13 ' 24
months PI. Spongiform lesions in the brains and PrPres deposits in
central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissues were seen in these
sheep. In orally inoculated sheep, clinical signs of scrapie were seen
between 27 and 43 months PI in 5/9 animals. The earliest detectable
PrPres was observed in brainstem and lymphoid tissues of a clinically
normal sheep at 15 months PI. Three of the 4 clinically normal sheep
were found to be positive at 15, 20, and 49 months PI by either
histopathology or the PrPres tests. This study was done to partially
fill a void in information on experimental studies of US scrapie
transmission (by intracerebral and oral routes) in genetically
susceptible sheep.






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