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From: TSS (216-119-129-71.ipset9.wt.net)
Subject: Docket No. 2004N-0454 Dietary Supplements; Premarket Notification for New Dietary Ingredient Notifications; Public Meeting [TSS SUBMISSION]
Date: November 5, 2004 at 10:03 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Docket No. 2004N-0454 Dietary Supplements; Premarket Notification for New Dietary Ingredient Notifications; Public Meeting [TSS SUBMISSION]
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 16:12:35 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov
CC: Kelly.Williams@cfsan.fda.gov

Docket No. 2004N-0454
Dietary Supplements; Premarket Notification for New Dietary
Ingredient Notifications; Public Meeting; TSS SUBMISSION TO
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~lrd/fr041020.html


Greetings FDA et al,

I wish to kindly comment once again on the risk of TSE
aka mad cow disease from Nutritional Supplements via
tissues from cattle, deer, elk, pigs, sheep, goat,
and or any tissue from any species. IN FDA previous
regulation on proposals to reduce this risk ;


U.S. Food and Drug Administration
USDA Logo--links to United States Department of Agriculture website


For Immediate Release
July 9, 2004

FSIS Press Office
APHIS Press Office
FDA Media Relations

(202) 720-9113
(202) 734-7799
(301) 827-6242


USDA and HHS Strengthen Safeguards Against
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

WASHINGTON, July 9, 2004--HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson and
Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman today announced three actions being
taken to further strengthen existing safeguards that protect consumers
against the agent that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE,
also known as "mad cow disease").

The three documents on display today include:

* A joint USDA Food Safety & Inspection Service (FSIS), USDA Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) notice that asks for public comment on
additional preventive actions that are being considered concerning
BSE;
* An interim final FDA rule that prohibits the use of certain
cattle-derived materials in human food (including dietary
supplements) and cosmetics; and
* A proposed FDA rule on recordkeeping requirements for the interim
final rule relating to this ban.

"Today's actions continue our strong commitment to public health
protections against BSE," Secretary Thompson said. "Although our current
rules are strong, when it comes to public health and safety we cannot be
content with the status quo. We must continue to make sure the public is
protected to the greatest extent possible."

"This Administration is committed to science-based measures to enhance
and protect public health," Veneman said. "The advance notice of
proposed rulemaking will allow the public the opportunity to provide
their input."

"The series of firewalls already in place offer excellent protection
against BSE," said Acting Commissioner of the Food and Drug
Administration, Dr. Lester M. Crawford. "With these additional measures,
we will make a strong system even stronger by putting into effect the
most comprehensive, science-based improvements possible."

The steps already taken have been effective in protecting the American
consumer from exposure to BSE. Import controls on live cattle and
certain ruminant products were put in place more than 15 years ago. In
1997, FDA finalized its animal feed ban, which has been the critical
safeguard to stop the spread of BSE through the U.S. cattle population
by prohibiting the feeding of most mammalian protein to cattle and other
ruminant animals. USDA implemented additional measures in January to
ensure that no cattle tissues known to be high risk for carrying the BSE
agent are included in USDA-regulated products. Finally, as became
evident last December, there is a contingency response plan, developed
over the past several years, that is launched immediately to contain any
potential damage after a BSE positive animal is found.

To allow interested parties and stakeholders the opportunity to comment
on the additional regulatory and policy measures under consideration,
USDA's APHIS and FSIS, along with the FDA, developed an advance notice
of proposed rulemaking that includes several additional actions the
federal government is considering regarding BSE.

The ANPR also provides the public a succinct report on the work of the
international review team (IRT) convened by Secretary Veneman to review
the U.S. response to the single case of BSE in the United States (in a
cow imported from Canada), along with a summary of the many actions
already taken by each agency on BSE.

USDA's FSIS continues to seek and address comments on actions taken in
relation to the BSE mitigation measures and put in place in January
2004. FSIS is also specifically seeking comments on whether a country's
BSE status should be taken into account when determining whether a
country's meat inspection system is equivalent to the U.S. regulations
including the provisions in the FSIS interim final rules.

USDA's APHIS is specifically seeking comments on the implementation of a
national animal identification system. In April, USDA announced the
availability of $18 million in Commodity Credit Corporation funding to
expedite development of a national animal identification system, which
is currently underway. APHIS is inviting comments on when and under what
circumstances the program should move from voluntary to mandatory, and
which species should be covered now and over the long term.

The ANPRM also requests comment on the following measures related to
animal feed, which is regulated by FDA:

* removing specified risk materials (SRM's) from all animal feed,
including pet food, to control the risks of cross contamination
throughout feed manufacture and distribution and on the farm due
to misfeeding;
* requiring dedicated equipment or facilities for handling and
storing feed and ingredients during manufacturing and
transportation, to prevent cross contamination;
* prohibiting the use of all mammalian and poultry protein in
ruminant feed, to prevent cross contamination; and prohibiting
materials from non-ambulatory disabled cattle and dead stock from
use in all animal feed.

FDA has reached a preliminary conclusion that it should propose to
remove SRM's from all animal feed and is currently working on a proposal
to accomplish this goal. Comments on these issues raised in the ANPRM
are due to FDA next month.

FDA today also issued an interim final rule that prohibits the use of
cattle-derived materials that can carry the BSE-infectious agent in
human foods, including certain meat-based products and dietary
supplements, and in cosmetics. These highÇrisk cattle-derived materials
include SRM's that are known to harbor concentrations of the infectious
agent for BSE, such as the brain, skull, eyes, and spinal cord of cattle
30 months of age or older, and a portion of the small intestine and
tonsils from all cattle, regardless of their age. Prohibited high-risk
bovine materials also include material from non-ambulatory disabled
cattle, the small intestine of all cattle, material from cattle not
inspected and passed for human consumption, and mechanically separated beef.

This action is consistent with the recent interim final rule issued by
USDA declaring these materials to be inedible (unfit for human food) and
prohibiting their use as human food.

FDA's interim final rule, in conjunction with interim final rules issued
by FSIS in January 2004, will minimize human exposure to materials that
scientific studies have demonstrated are likely to contain the BSE agent
when derived from cattle that are infected with the disease. Consumption
of products contaminated with the agent that causes BSE is the likely
cause of a similar disease in people called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob
disease.

Although FDA's interim final rule has the full force and effect of law
and takes effect immediately upon publication in the Federal Register,
FDA is also asking for public comment on it.

In conjunction with the publication of the interim final rule, FDA is
also proposing to require that manufacturers and processors of
FDA-regulated human food and cosmetics containing cattle-derived
material maintain records showing that prohibited materials are not used
in their products. FDA is taking this action because records documenting
the absence of such materials are important to ensure compliance with
requirements of the interim final rule.

Publication of this USDA-FDA notice, as well as the two FDA documents,
is scheduled for mid-July in the Federal Register. Comments should be
submitted as directed in the addresses section of each document. Each
document also provides information about how and where comments received
may be viewed.

####

Note to Reporters: USDA news releases, program announcements and media
advisories are available on the Internet. Go to the APHIS home page at
www.aphis.usda.gov and click on the "News"
button.

HHS news releases are available online at www.hhs.gov
; FDA news releases can be found at www.fda.gov
, which will also provide links to the
documents discussed in this release.

####

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/NEW01084.html

I had previously voiced my concerns on this risk factor here ;

Docket Management Docket: 96N-0417 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice
in Manufacturing, Packing, or Holding Dietary Ingredients a
Comment Number: EC -2
Accepted - Volume 7

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Mar03/031403/96N-0417-EC-2.htm

HOWEVER, I am still very concerned about several factors of the previous
regulation
changes, due to additional scientific evidence I wish to kindly submit
to you below;

> "The series of firewalls already in place offer excellent protection
> against BSE," said Acting Commissioner of the Food and Drug
> Administration, Dr. Lester M. Crawford. "With these additional
> measures, we will make a strong system even stronger by putting into
> effect the most comprehensive, science-based improvements possible."
>

THESE firewalls are failing terribly. The USA is still feeding mammalian
tissue to cattle, sheep, pigs, deer and elk.
(see warning letters in reference), and inevitably the different
products and by-products from these species
are reaching the human/animal consumer through various routes and
sources and one is Nutritional Supplements.
It has been documented that .1 of one gram is lethal (via W.H.O. Dr
Maura Ricketts).

MANY things have changed since my last submission on this topic. Most
importantly the USA BSE GBR risk
factor has been upgraded to a higher risk factor of USA BSE GBR III.
(see this document in reference)

ALSO, there has been a new TSE in cattle discovered that is very similar
to 'sporadic CJD' called BASE,
new atypical TSEs in sheep and goats, with one being BSE. NEW studies
showing TSE infectivity in
the muscles of some species and with this new TSE in cattle and more
sensitive testing coming to pass,
the threat of these other tissues infectivity, besides CNS is very real
(see references), and further precautions
are needed ASAP.

WE must not forget the studies from Asante, Collinge et al that shows
that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine
genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable
from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm

TSEs are rampant in the USA, with TSE in the USA bovine unknown, if you
consider the track record of
the USDA/APHIS et al. YOU cannot intentionally let a stumbling and
staggering CNS cow go untested and ordered
to be rendered. Seems there are 500+ more just like it. (see references)

BSE has now been documented in a GOAT (see reference).

YOUNGEST cow to date with BSE is 20 months old (see references).

IF you consider all this, then look at the most obvious ;

1: J Infect Dis 1980 Aug;142(2):205-8


Oral transmission of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie to
nonhuman primates.

Gibbs CJ Jr, Amyx HL, Bacote A, Masters CL, Gajdusek DC.

Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of humans and scrapie disease of
sheep and goats were transmitted to squirrel monkeys (Saimiri
sciureus) that were exposed to the infectious agents only by their
nonforced consumption of known infectious tissues. The asymptomatic
incubation period in the one monkey exposed to the virus of kuru was
36 months; that in the two monkeys exposed to the virus of
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was 23 and 27 months, respectively; and
that in the two monkeys exposed to the virus of scrapie was 25 and
32 months, respectively. Careful physical examination of the buccal
cavities of all of the monkeys failed to reveal signs or oral
lesions. One additional monkey similarly exposed to kuru has
remained asymptomatic during the 39 months that it has been under
observation.

PMID: 6997404

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=6997404&dopt=Abstract

THE most obvious and logical thing to do would be to BAN ALL ANIMAL
by-products in Nutritional Supplements.

How much is too much? How much is not enough? What about accumulation?
What is the Threshold of exposure, to infectivity, to clinical disease?
How many strains/phenotype does sporadic CJD consist of and
What is the infectivity of each one of those phenotypes
(cwd/scrapie/BSE/BASE=CJD)?
Until these questions are answered, you are gambling, nothing more.
I just pray that you get it right...

ALL human/animal TSEs should be made reportable Nationally and
Internationally.

ALL human TSE victims (family) should fill out mandatory CJD
Questionnaire... TSS


***REFERENCES***

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk
(GBR) of the United States of America (USA)
Publication date: 20 August 2004

Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

* 167 kB Report


* 105 kB Summary

Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working
Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission
(EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United
States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more
cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in
USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004
based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached
domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in
the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and
therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is
possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached
domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle
imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were
processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This
risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90s when
domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the
low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with
continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is
likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or
pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no
significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains
extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be
(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently
increases.

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/efsa_scientific_reports/gbr_assessments/573_en.html


From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr. [flounder@wt.net]
Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2003 1:03 PM
To: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov
Cc: ggraber@cvm.fda.gov; Linda.Grassie@fda.gov; BSE-L
Subject: Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System [TSS SUBMISSION
TO DOCKET 2003N-0312]

Greetings FDA,

snip...

PLUS, if the USA continues to flagrantly ignore the _documented_ science
to date about the known TSEs in the USA (let alone the undocumented TSEs
in cattle), it is my opinion, every other Country that is dealing with
BSE/TSE should boycott the USA and demand that the SSC reclassify the
USA BSE GBR II risk assessment to BSE/TSE GBR III 'IMMEDIATELY'. for the
SSC to _flounder_ any longer on this issue, should also be regarded with
great suspicion as well. NOT to leave out the OIE and it's terribly
flawed system of disease surveillance. the OIE should make a move on CWD
in the USA, and make a risk assessment on this as a threat to human
health. the OIE should also change the mathematical formula for testing
of disease. this (in my opinion and others) is terribly flawed as well.
to think that a sample survey of 400 or so cattle in a population of 100
million, to think this will find anything, especially after seeing how
many TSE tests it took Italy and other Countries to find 1 case of BSE
(1 million rapid TSE test in less than 2 years, to find 102 BSE cases),
should be proof enough to make drastic changes of this system. the OIE
criteria for BSE Country classification and it's interpretation is very
problematic. a text that is suppose to give guidelines, but is not
understandable, cannot be considered satisfactory. the OIE told me 2
years ago that they were concerned with CWD, but said any changes might
take years. well, two years have come and gone, and no change in
relations with CWD as a human health risk. if we wait for politics and
science to finally make this connection, we very well may die before any
decisions
or changes are made. this is not acceptable. we must take the politics
and the industry out of any final decisions of the Scientific community.
this has been the problem from day one with this environmental man made
death sentence. some of you may think i am exaggerating, but you only
have to see it once, you only have to watch a loved one die from this
one time, and you will never forget, OR forgive...yes, i am still very
angry... but the transmission studies DO NOT lie, only the politicians
and the industry do... and they are still lying to this day...TSS

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt

BSE prions propagate as either variant CJD-like or sporadic CJD-like
prion strains in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein

Emmanuel A. Asante, Jacqueline M. Linehan, Melanie Desbruslais, Susan
Joiner, Ian Gowland, Andrew L. Wood, Julie Welch, Andrew F. Hill, Sarah
E. Lloyd, Jonathan D.F. Wadsworth and John Collinge1

MRC Prion Unit and Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of
Neurology, University College, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK 1
Corresponding author e-mail: j.collinge@prion.ucl.ac.uk


Received August 1, 2002; revised September 24, 2002; accepted October
17, 2002

Abstract


Variant CreutzfeldtJakob disease (vCJD) has been recognized to date
only in individuals homozygous for methionine at PRNP codon 129. Here we
show that transgenic mice expressing human PrP methionine 129,
inoculated with either bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or variant
CJD prions, may develop the neuropathological and molecular phenotype of
vCJD, consistent with these diseases being caused by the same prion
strain. Surprisingly, however, BSE transmission to these transgenic
mice, in addition to producing a vCJD-like phenotype, can also result in
a distinct molecular phenotype that is indistinguishable from that of
sporadic CJD with PrPSc type 2. These data suggest that more than one
BSE-derived prion strain might infect humans; it is therefore possible
that some patients with a phenotype consistent with sporadic CJD may
have a disease arising from BSE exposure...

http://embojournal.npgjournals.com/cgi/content/full/21/23/6358

THE new findings of BASE in cattle in Italy of Identification of a
second bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy: Molecular
similarities with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0305777101v1


Adaptation of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent to primates
and comparison with Creutzfeldt- Jakob disease: Implications for
human health

THE findings from Corinne Ida Lasmézas*, [dagger] , Jean-Guy Fournier*,
Virginie Nouvel*,

Hermann Boe*, Domíníque Marcé*, François Lamoury*, Nicolas Kopp [Dagger

] , Jean-Jacques Hauw§, James Ironside¶, Moira Bruce [||] , Dominique

Dormont*, and Jean-Philippe Deslys* et al, that The agent responsible
for French iatrogenic growth hormone-linked CJD taken as a control is
very different from vCJD but is similar to that found in one case of
sporadic CJD and one sheep scrapie isolate;

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/041490898v1

Characterization of two distinct prion strains
derived from bovine spongiform encephalopathy
transmissions to inbred mice

Sarah E. Lloyd, Jacqueline M. Linehan, Melanie Desbruslais,
Susan Joiner, Jennifer Buckell, Sebastian Brandner,
Jonathan D. F. Wadsworth and John Collinge

Correspondence
John Collinge
j.collinge@prion.ucl.ac.uk

MRC Prion Unit and Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of
Neurology,
University College, London WC1N 3BG, UK
Received 9 December 2003
Accepted 27 April 2004

Distinct prion strains can be distinguished by differences in incubation
period, neuropathology
and biochemical properties of disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc)
in inoculated mice.
Reliable comparisons of mouse prion strain properties can only be
achieved after passage in
genetically identical mice, as host prion protein sequence and genetic
background are known
to modulate prion disease phenotypes. While multiple prion strains have
been identified in
sheep scrapie and CreutzfeldtJakob disease, bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE) is
thought to be caused by a single prion strain. Primary passage of BSE
prions to different lines
of inbred mice resulted in the propagation of two distinct PrPSc types,
suggesting that two
prion strains may have been isolated. To investigate this further, these
isolates were
subpassaged in a single line of inbred mice (SJL) and it was confirmed
that two distinct prion
strains had been identified. MRC1 was characterized by a short
incubation time (110±3 days),
a mono-glycosylated-dominant PrPSc type and a generalized diffuse
pattern of PrP-immunoreactive
deposits, while MRC2 displayed a much longer incubation time (155±1 days),
a di-glycosylated-dominant PrPSc type and a distinct pattern of
PrP-immunoreactive deposits
and neuronal loss. These data indicate a crucial involvement of the host
genome in modulating
prion strain selection and propagation in mice. It is possible that
multiple disease phenotypes
may also be possible in BSE prion infection in humans and other animals.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/8/2471

In an experimental study of the transmissibility of BSE to the pig,
seven of 10 pigs, infected at 1-2 weeks of age by multiple-route
parenteral inoculation with a homogenate of bovine brain from
natural BSE cases developed lesions typical of spongiform
encephalopathy...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?holding=npg&cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10684682&dopt=Abstract


THE recent discoveries of previously unidentified strains of
Scrapie such as 221C44 and the Nor9845;

FULL TEXT APPRX. 91 PAGES

UK Strategy for Research and
Development on Human and Animal
Health Aspects of Transmissible
Spongiform Encephalopathies

2004-2007

http://www.mrc.ac.uk/pdf-uk_strategy_v5.2.pdf

WHEN in fact, the findings from Marsh and the findings at
MISSION, TEXAS support even further evidence that there
are further strains of TSE in the USA besides that one
accidentally documented BSE case in Washington on
Dec. 23, 2003;

In Confidence - Perceptions of unconventional slow virus diseases of
animals in the USA - Report of a visit to the USA - April-May 1989 - G A H
Wells [head of England's main veterinary lab]

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

Evidence That Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy
Results from Feeding Infected Cattle

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m09/tab05.pdf

THE youngest age of BSE case to date is 20 months old; As at: 31 May
2003 Year of onset Age youngest case (mnths) Age 2nd youngest case
(mnths) Age 2nd oldest case (yrs.mnths) Age oldest case (yrs.mnths) 1986
30 33 5.03 5.07 1987 30 31 9.09 10.00 1988 24 27 10.02 11.01(2) 1989 21
24(4) 12.00(2) 15.04 1990 24(2) 26 13.03 14.00 1991 24 26(3) 14.02 17.05
1992 20 26 15.02 16.02 1993 29 30(3) 14.10 18.10 1994 30(2) 31(2) 14.05
16.07 1995 24 32 14.09 15.05 1996 29 30 15.07 17.02 1997 37(7) 38(3)
14.09 15.01 1998 34 36 14.07 15.05 1999 39(2) 41 13.07 13.10 2000 40 42
17.08 19.09 2001 48(2) 56 14.10 14.11 2002 51 52 15.08 15.09(2) 2003 50
62 11.11 14.11

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/bse-statistics/bse/yng-old.html

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/index.html

The implications of the Swiss result for Britain, which has had the most
BSE, are complex. Only cattle aged 30 months or younger are eaten in
Britain, on the assumption, based on feeding trials, that cattle of that
age, even if they were infected as calves, have not yet accumulated
enough prions to be infectious. But the youngest cow to develop BSE on
record in Britain was 20 months old, showing some are fast incubators.
Models predict that 200-300 cattle under 30 months per year are infected
with BSE and enter the food chain currently in Britain. Of these 3-5
could be fast incubators and carrying detectable quantities of prion.

http://www.sare.org/htdocs/hypermail/html-home/28-html/0359.html

IP/04/1324

Brussels, 28 October 2004


Commission submits French Research Findings on TSE in a goat to Expert
Panel

Following the findings by a research group in France that they suspect
the presence of a TSE infection in a goats brain which tests cannot
distinguish from BSE, the European Commission has submitted data
received from the French authorities to the Community Reference
Laboratory (CRL) for TSEs based in Weybridge, England, for an evaluation
by an expert panel. TSEs are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,
namely BSE affecting cattle, and scrapie affecting goats and sheep. The
expert panel will evaluate, over the next two weeks or so, the
scientific evidence to see if it indicates the presence of BSE in the
goat. This isolated incident does not present a risk to public health as
the goat and its herd did not enter the food and feed chain.

snip...

http://europa.eu.int/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/04/1324&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en

Prepared by
National Center for Animal Health Programs
Eradication and Surveillance Team
July 31, 2004

SCRAPIE

INFECTED AND SOURCE FLOCKS

AS of July 31, 2004, there were 71 scrapie infected and source flocks
(figure 3). There were 4 new infected and source flocks reported in July
(figure 4) with a total of 90 flocks reported for FY 2004 (figure 5).
The total infected and source flocks that have been released in FY 2004
are 62 (figure 6), with 15 flocks released in July. The ratio of
infected and source flocks released to newly infected and source flocks
for FY 2004 = 0.69 : 1.
IN ADDITION, AS OF JULY 31, 2004, 282 SCRAPIE CASES HAVE
BEEN CONFIRMED and reported by the National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL) in FY 2004, OF WHICH 42 WERE RSSS CASES (figure 7).
This includes 60 NEWLY CONFIRMED CASES IN JULY 2004 (figure 8). THIRTEEN
cases of scrapie in GOATS have been reported since 1990 (figure 9). ONE
NEW GOAT CASE WAS REPORTED IN FY 2004. New infected flocks, source
flocks, and flocks released or put on clean-up plans for FY 2004 are
depicted in figure 10...

snip...

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahps/scrapie/monthly_report/monthly-report.html


Emergency Programs

Imported Belgium/Netherlands Sheep Test Results
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/pubs/fsheet_faq_notice/fs_ahvtsheeptr.pdf

APRIL 2002

snip...

The Western-blot test however cannot differentiate
between scrapie and BSE. The only known validated
method to differentiate between these two diseases
requires a series of mouse bioassay systems, which
take at least 2-3 years for completion.

snip...

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/pubs/fsheet_faq_notice/fs_ahvtsheeptr.pdf

PLEASE NOTE, the imported Belgium sheep that were confiscated and
destroyed and were
suppose to be tested, have been put off for more than 2 YEARS due to
political reasons via
UK (personal communication Dr. Linda Detwiler).

Prions in skeletal muscle

Patrick J. Bosque*,dagger ,Dagger , Chongsuk Ryou*, Glenn Telling*,§,
David Peretz*,dagger , Giuseppe Legname*,dagger , Stephen J.
DeArmond*,dagger ,¶, and Stanley B. Prusiner*,dagger ,||,**

* Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Departments of dagger
Neurology, ¶ Pathology, and || Biochemistry and Biophysics, University
of California, San Francisco, CA 94143

Contributed by Stanley B. Prusiner, December 28, 2001

Considerable evidence argues that consumption of beef products from
cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions
causes new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In an effort to prevent
new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, certain "specified offals,"
including neural and lymphatic tissues, thought to contain high titers
of prions have been excluded from foods destined for human consumption
[Phillips, N. A., Bridgeman, J. & Ferguson-Smith, M. (2000) in The BSE
Inquiry (Stationery Office, London), Vol. 6, pp. 413-451]. Here we
report that mouse skeletal muscle can propagate prions and accumulate
substantial titers of these pathogens. We found both high prion titers
and the disease-causing isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) in the
skeletal muscle of wild-type mice inoculated with either the Me7 or
Rocky Mountain Laboratory strain of murine prions. Particular muscles
accumulated distinct levels of PrPSc, with the highest levels observed
in muscle from the hind limb. To determine whether prions are produced
or merely accumulate intramuscularly, we established transgenic mice
expressing either mouse or Syrian hamster PrP exclusively in muscle.
Inoculating these mice intramuscularly with prions resulted in the
formation of high titers of nascent prions in muscle. In contrast,
inoculating mice in which PrP expression was targeted to hepatocytes
resulted in low prion titers. Our data demonstrate that factors in
addition to the amount of PrP expressed determine the tropism of prions
for certain tissues. That some muscles are intrinsically capable of
accumulating substantial titers of prions is of particular concern.
Because significant dietary exposure to prions might occur through the
consumption of meat, even if it is largely free of neural and lymphatic
tissue, a comprehensive effort to map the distribution of prions in the
muscle of infected livestock is needed. Furthermore, muscle may provide
a readily biopsied tissue from which to diagnose prion disease in
asymptomatic animals and even humans. Dagger Present address: Department
of Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO 80204.

§ Present address: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University
of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0230.

** To whom reprint requests should be addressed. E-mail: vann@cgl.ucsf.edu.

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.052707499

http://www.pnas.org/


Extraneural Pathologic Prion Protein in Sporadic Creutzfeldtâ¬Jakob
Disease

Markus Glatzel, M.D., Eugenio Abela, Manuela Maissen, M.S., and Adriano
Aguzzi, M.D., Ph.D.

snip...

Conclusions Using sensitive techniques, we identified extraneural
deposition of PrPSc in
spleen and muscle samples from approximately one third of patients who
died with
sporadic Creutzfeldtâ¬Jakob disease. Extraneural PrPSc appears to
correlate with
a long duration of disease.

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/short/349/19/1812?query=TOC

EMBO reports AOP Published online: 11 April 2003

Widespread PrPSc accumulation in muscles of hamsters orally infected
with scrapie

Achim Thomzig, Christine Kratzel, Gudrun Lenz, Dominique Krüger &
Michael
Beekes Robert Koch-Institut, P26, Nordufer 20, D-13353 Berlin, Germany

Received 13 February 2003; Accepted 13 March 2003; Published online 11
April 2003.

Abstract :

Scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy and chronic wasting disease
are orally communicable, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies
(TSEs). As zoonotic transmissions of TSE agents may pose a risk to human
health, the identification of reservoirs for infectivity in animal
tissues and their exclusion from human consumption has become a matter
of great importance for consumer protection. In this study, a variety of
muscles from hamsters that were orally challenged with scrapie was
screened for the presence of a molecular marker for TSE infection, PrPSc
(the pathological isoform of the prion protein PrP). Sensitive western
blotting revealed consistent PrPSc accumulation in skeletal muscles from
forelimb and hindlimb, head, back and shoulder, and in tongue.
Previously, our animal model has provided substantial baseline
information about the peripheral routing of infection in naturally
occurring and orally acquired ruminant TSEs. Therefore, the findings
described here highlight further the necessity to investigate thoroughly
whether muscles of TSE-infected sheep, cattle, elk and deer contain
infectious agents.

http://www.emboreports.org/

Chronic Wasting Disease and Potential Transmission to Humans

Ermias D. Belay,*Comments
Ryan A.
Maddox,* Elizabeth S. Williams, Michael W. Miller,! Pierluigi
Gambetti,§ and Lawrence B. Schonberger*
*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA;
University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA; !Colorado Division of
Wildlife, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; and §Case Western Reserve
University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm


Environmental Sources of Prion Transmission in Mule Deer

Michael W. Miller,*Comments
Elizabeth S.
Williams, N. Thompson Hobbs,! and Lisa L. Wolfe*
*Colorado Division of Wildlife, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; University
of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA; and !Colorado State University, Fort
Collins, Colorado, USA

Suggested citation for this article: Miller MW, Williams ES, Hobbs
NT, Wolfe LL. Environmental sources of prion transmission in mule
deer. Emerg Infect Dis [serial on the Internet]. 2004 Jun [date
cited]. Available from:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/04-0010.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/04-0010.htm

BSE MAMMALIAN FEED BAN WARNING LETTERS 2004 USA

PRODUCT
Product is custom made deer feed packaged in 100 lb. poly bags. The
product has no labeling. Recall # V-003-5.
CODE
The product has no lot code. All custom made feed purchased between June
24, 2004 and September 8, 2004.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Farmers Elevator Co, Houston, OH, by telephone and letter dated
September 27, 2004. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.
REASON
Feed may contain protein derived from mammalian tissues which is
prohibited in ruminant feed.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
Approximately 6 tons.
DISTRIBUTION
OH.

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR October 20, 2004

PRODUCT
Product is custom made steer/cattle feed packaged in 100 lb. poly bags.
The product has no labeling. Recall # V-001-5.
CODE
The product has no lot code. All custom made feed purchased between June
24, 2004 and September 8, 2004.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Farmers Elevator Co, Houston, OH, by telephone and letter dated
September 27, 2004. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.
REASON
Feed may contain protein derived from mammalian tissues which is
prohibited in ruminant feed.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
Approximately 80 1û2 tons of steer/cattle feed.
DISTRIBUTION
OH.

_______________________________

PRODUCT
Product is custom made sheep/goat feed packaged in 100 lb. poly bags.
The product has no labeling. Recall # V-002-5.
CODE
The product has no lot code. All custom made feed purchased between June
24, 2004 and September 8, 2004.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Farmers Elevator Co, Houston, OH, by telephone and letter dated
September 27, 2004. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.
REASON
Feed may contain protein derived from mammalian tissues which is
prohibited in ruminant feed.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
Approximately 8 tons.
DISTRIBUTION
OH.

_______________________________

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR October 20, 2004

http://www.fda.gov/

PRODUCT
a) Product is 9 Mile Steer Feed, packaged in white poly weaved
bags, each containing 100 lbs. A white label tied to the
inlet of each bag with twine identifies the product. Recall
# V-187-4;
b) Product is 9 Mile Pig and Sow Feed, packaged in white poly
weaved bags, each bag containing 100 lbs. A white label tied
to the inlet of each bag with twine identifies the product.
Recall # V-188-4.
CODE
The products contain no code date.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Farmers Elevator, Co., Houston, OH, by telephone and letters dated
September 8, 2004. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.
REASON
Products may contain protein derived from mammalian tissues which is
prohibited in ruminant (steer) feed. FDA regulation, if the feed is
intended for non-ruminants (pigs), the bag labels must bear the
statement ìDo not feed to cattle or other ruminantsî.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
700 lbs. Steer feed and 1,500 lb. Pig and sow fed.
DISTRIBUTION
OH.

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2004/ENF00869.html

PRODUCT
a) Premier Catfish Food, packaged in 50 pound bags (white paper
with an orange label). Recall #V-190-4;
b) Happy Fisherman Fish Food, pellet form, 50 pound bags.
Recall # V-191-4.
CODE
a) T1 Best By 08/27/05;
b) T21 Best By 11 DEC 05 and T11 Best By 02 OCT 05.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Sunshine Mills, Inc., Tupelo, MS, by telephone beginning on April 14,
2004. Firm initiated recall is complete.
REASON
The catfish food contains prohibited material (meat & bone meal) but
does not contain the cautionary statement, "Do not feed to cattle or
other ruminants" on the label.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
1,092  50 pound bags.
DISTRIBUTION
TX and MO.

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2004/ENF00869.html


Public Health Service
Food and Drug Administration

San Francisco District
1431 Harbor Bay Parkway
Alameda, CA 94502-7070
Telephone: 510/337-6700


VIA HAND DELIVERY

Our Reference No. 1000123954

June 23, 2004

Ronald M. Foster, Manager
Randall C. Boyce, Manager
Trevor O. Foster, Manager
George P. Foster, Manager
Fresno Farming LLC
P.O. Box 457
1000 Davis Street
Livingston, California

WARNING LETTER

Dear Mssrs. Foster, Boyce, Foster, and Foster:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted an inspection of
your medicated animal feed mill operation, Fresco Farming LLC, located
in Traver, California from April 14, 2004 through May 6, 2004, and found
significant deviations from the requirements set forth in Title 21, Code
of Federal Regulations, Section 589.2000 (21 C.F.R. 589.2000) - Animal
Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to
prevent the establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy (BSE). Because you failed to follow this rule, products
you manufactured and distributed are adulterated within the meaning of
Section 402(a)(4) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act)
because they were prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions
whereby they may have been rendered injurious to health.

Our inspection found the following violations of 21 C.F.R. 589.2000:

1. Failure to provide for measures to avoid commingling or
cross-contamination of products that contain or may contain protein
derived from mammalian tissues into animal protein or feeds that may be
used for ruminants to comply with 21 C.F.R. 589.2000(e)(1)(iii).

* Your firm uses a vacuum system to clean up spilled product in the
tunnel area. This tunnel area houses the two receiving conveyor
systems and the elevators for the two conveyor systems. When
product, including ruminant meat and bone meal, is spilled onto
the floor of this area, the spilled product is vacuumed up by the
vacuum system and, via a discharge hose, was placed into a
conveyor system that your firm had designated as free of ruminant
meat and bone meal. Your firm admitted that it was unaware of the
vacuum system discharging into the conveyor systems designated as
free of ruminant meat and bone meal and that this had been in
place since April 2003. Your firm remedied this problem during
FDAs April/May 2004 inspection by removing the discharge hose
connection to the conveyer system that your firm had designated as
free of ruminant meat and bone meal .
* Your firm uses a dust collection system that pulls dust from
systems that receive both ruminant meat and bone meal and feed
ingredients intended for ruminants. This dust system then
discharged collected product back into the two conveyor systems
via a cross connection, thereby making it likely that ruminant
meat and bone meal became commingled with ruminant feed
ingredients. Your firm admitted that it was unaware of the cross
connection and that it had been in place since April 2003. Your
firm removed the cross connection during FDAs April/May 2004
inspection.

2. Failure to maintain written procedures specifying the clean-out
procedure or other means, and specifying the procedures for separating
products that contain or may contain protein derived from mammalian
tissue from all other protein products from the time of receipt until
the time of shipment, to comply with 21 C.F.R. 589.2000(e)(1)(iv). This
observation was also noted during FDAs July/August 2003 inspection of
your firm.

* There are no written procedures for separating products that
contain prohibited material from ingredients used in ruminant
feeds from the time of receipt until the time of shipment.
* The written procedure for cleaning out or flushing equipment after
mixing feeds containing prohibited material was not adequate to
prevent contamination of ruminant feed with prohibited material.

3. Failure to maintain records sufficient to track materials that
contain protein derived from mammalian tissues throughout their receipt,
processing, and distribution to comply with 21 C.F.R. 589.2000(e)(1)(i).
This observation was also noted during FDAs July/August 2003 inspection
of your firm.

* Specifically, your firm has failed to develop and implement
complete written procedures to separate ruminant meat and bone
meal from feed ingredients intended for ruminants from the time of
receipt until the time of distribution. The written procedures
that do exist fail to address the use of equipment common to
ruminant meat and bone meal and ruminant feed ingredients.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deficiencies at
your facility. As a manufacturer of materials intended for use as animal
feed, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation and
the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with the law.
You should take prompt action to correct these violations, and you
should establish a system whereby such violations do not recur. Failure
to promptly correct these violations may result in regulatory action
without further notice, such as seizure and/or injunction.

You should notify this office in writing within fifteen (15) working
days of receiving this letter of the steps you have taken to bring your
firm into compliance with the law. Your response should include an
explanation of each step being taken to correct the violations and
prevent their recurrence. If corrective actions cannot be completed in
fifteen (15) working days, state the reason for the delay and the date
by which the corrections will be completed. Include copies of any
available documentation demonstrating that corrections have been made.

Please send your reply to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration,
Attention: Ms. Harumi Kishida, Compliance Officer, 1431 Harbor Bay
Parkway, Alameda, California 94502-7070. If you have questions regarding
this letter, please contact Ms. Kishida at (510) 337-6824.

Sincerely,

/s/

CD Moss, Acting DD for
Barbara J. Cassens
District Director
San Francisco District

cc:
VIA CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED
C. Michael Blasco, Feed Mill Manager
Fresno Farming LLC
P.O. Box 430
Traver, California 93673

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g4849d.htm


Public Health Service
Food and Drug Administration

Chicago District
550 West Jackson Blvd., 15th Floor
Chicago, Illinois 60661
Telephone: 312-353-5863


July 12, 2004

WARNING LETTER
CHI-16-04

CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Mr. Donald E. Hamilton, President/Owner
Illini Feeds, Inc.
P.O. Box 86, 1145 State Hwy. 94
Aledo, Illinois 61231

Dear Mr. Hamilton:

On February 19 and 20, 2004, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
conducted an inspection of your animal feed handling facility located at
1145 State Highway 94, Aledo, Illinois. The inspection found significant
deviations from the requirements set forth in Title 21, Code of Federal
Regulations, Part 589.2000 (21 CFR 589.2000) - Animal Proteins
Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. This regulation is intended to prevent the
establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
(BSE). The deviations cause the swine feed manufactured by your facility
to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(a)(1) of the Federal
Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act).

Our investigation found that salvaged pet food containing prohibited
material was added as an ingredient to the swine products manufactured
at your facility. During the inspection, our investigator found that you
failed to label your non-ruminant products with the required caution
statement - Do not feed to cattle or other ruminants. [21 CFR
589.2000(d)(1)]

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of violations. As
a manufacturer of materials intended for use in animal feed, you are
responsible for assuring that your overall operation and the products
you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with the law.

You should take prompt action to correct this violation, and you should
establish a system whereby such violations do not recur. Failure to
promptly correct this violation may result in regulatory action without
further notice, such as seizure and/or injunction.

During the inspection, you told the investigator that you would put the
required cautionary statement on your products that contain prohibited
material, and maintain tracking documents for all incoming ingredients,
including animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed. Please notify
this office in writing within 15 working days of receiving this letter
of any further steps you have taken to assure that your firm is in
compliance with the law. Your response should also include an
explanation of each step taken to correct the violations, and prevent
their recurrence. Please include copies of any available documentation
such as written procedures, corrected labeling, etc., demonstrating that
corrections have been made. If corrections cannot be completed within 15
working days, state the reason for the delay and the date by which the
corrections will be completed.

Your reply should be directed to Paul A. Boehmer, Compliance Officer, at
the above address.

Sincerely,

/s/

Scott J. MacIntire
District Director

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g4840d.htm


Public Health Service
Food and Drug Administration

Chicago District
550 West Jackson Blvd., 15th Floor
Chicago, Illinois 60661
Telephone: 312-353-5863


June 15, 2004

WARNING LETTER

CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Mr. David W. Bernauer
CEO and Chairman of the Board
Walgreen co.
200 Wilmot Rd.
Deerfield, IL 60015

Dear Mr. Bernauer:

Inspection of your firms warehouse at 5100 Lake Terrace N.E., Mt.
Vernon, Illinois, by the Illinois Department of Public Health and the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on February 25, 26, and 27, and
March 2, 2004, documented numerous insanitary conditions which caused
the food and drug products stored there to become adulterated.

Our inspection showed that the food and drug products stored and held at
your facility violated the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the
Act), rendering them adulterated. These adulterated fwd and drug
products: a) consisted in whole or in part of filthy substances,
including rodent fecal pellets, rodent hair, and insects, in violation
of Section 402(a)(3) of the Act [21 U.S.C. 342(a)(3)]; and/or b) had
been held under insanitary conditions whereby they have become
contaminated with rodent filth, in violation of Sections 402(a)(4) and
501(a)(2)(a) of the Act [21 U.S.C. 342(a)(4), 351(a)(2)(a)].

Evidence of rodent activity documented throughout the old and new
warehouse included dead mice in traps, excreta pellets, and gnawed paper
material observed in, on, and near food and drugs stored in the
warehouse. Rodents gnaw holes were observed into several packaged food
products with rodent hairs at gnaw holes into products. Many more fecal
pellets were on food and drug packages and still more were found near
the stored foods, drugs, and cosmetics in the warehouse.

Other conditions observed during the inspection that could be
contributing factors to rodent infestation include damaged and/or poorly
fitting rail and truck dock doors, gaps around a conduit entry into the
building, and the structural condition of the concrete and expansion
gaps at floor/wall/support beam junctions in various areas of the
warehouse allowing the entry or harborage of pests. Additionally, the
investigators observed cobwebs, dead insects, dust, debris, product
spillage, and papers in the warehouse, indicating a general lack of good
sanitation practices.

Also, products that contain or may contain animal protein prohibited
ruminant feed (BSE material) failed to bear the caution statement, Do
not feed to cattle or other ruminants. Specifically, pet food products
were salvaged, repackaged, and donated to [redacted] and other similar
organizations in the area, without the proper labeling and agreement
that they would not be used for ruminants. Please refer to Title 21,
Code of Federal Regulations, Section 589.2000, concerning these
requirements.

Our laboratory confirmed the findings of rodent excreta, rodent hairs on
product gnaw holes, and rodent gnawed fibers (packaging material)
sampled from the warehouse during the inspection.

The above listed violations are not intended to be all-inclusive. It is
your responsibility to assure adherence with each requirement of the Act
and its implementing regulations. The investigators reported that you
destroyed food products that showed evidence of contamination and began
to take some steps to correct the insanitary conditions in your
facility. We request that you take prompt action to correct all violations.

Please provide this office, within 15 working days of receipt of this
letter, a detailed response stating the actions you plan to take and
have taken to correct and prevent the recurrence of these objectionable
conditions. Provide the time within which corrections will be completed,
reasons why any corrective action cannot be completed, and documentation
to show that corrections have been made. Failure to take prompt action
to correct all violations may result in regulatory action without
further notice. Such action includes seizure and/or injunction.

Your reply should be directed to Paul A. Boehmer, Compliance Officer, at
the Chicago District Office.

Sincerely,

/s/

Scott J. MacIntire
District Director

cc:
Stephen J. Lawrence,
Distribution Center Manager
Walgreen Co.
5100 Lake Terrace NE
Mount Vernon, IL 62864-9665

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g4853d.htm

RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: VETERINARY - CLASS II

_______________________________

PRODUCT

a) Bulk whole corn. Recall # V-150-4;
b) Bulk rolled corn. Recall # V-151-4;
c) Bulk rolled corn with added fat. Recall # V-152-4.

CODE

No coding information is used.

RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER

Fresno Farming LlC, Traver, CA, by letters on June 30, 2004. Firm
initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON
Corn for feed may be contaminated with RUMINANT MEAT AND BONE MEAL.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
Unknown.

DISTRIBUTION
Unknown.
____________________________

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2004/ENF00857.html


> VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
> UNKNOWN.
>
> DISTRIBUTION
> UNKNOWN.


gotta love those USDA/APHIS TRIPLE BSE FIREWALLS :-(

> further strengthen existing safeguards that protect consumers against
> the agent that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also
> known as "mad cow disease")


YOU cannot further strengthen BSE/TSE safeguards and ignore the factors
I pointed out above, and expect to
stop the spread of this agent via Nutritional Supplements, without
banning all animal by-products in Nutritional Supplements...


thank you,

I am sincerely,

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: Docket No. 2004N-0454 Dietary Supplements; Premarket Notification for New Dietary Ingredient Notifications; Public Meeting [TSS SUBMISSION]
Date: Wed, 03 Nov 2004 21:55:07 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
CC: fdadockets@oc.fda.gov, Kelly.Williams@cfsan.fda.gov
References: <418957D3.4030504@wt.net>


Greetings again FDA,

I must add this to my submission below;

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Detection of prion in peripheral nerve (11th BSE case of Japan)
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 01:11:50 +0900
From: Jun-ichi Ohnishi
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE

##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Hello List members,

According to Nov. 2 Yomiuri Newspaper, researchers of the Prion
Disease Research Center, the National Institute of Animal Health
of Japan reported in the International Symposium of Prion Diseases
held in Sendai from October 31 to November 2., 2004, that they
detected prion in the adrenal gland and peripheral (sciatic and
peroneal) nerves of the 11th BSE case of Japan (a 94-months old
cow found dead on the farm on March 4 this year).

http://www.maff.go.jp/www/press/cont2/20041101press_7.htm
(only in Japanese)

Jun-ichi Ohnishi
Saitama University
Japan

################# BSE-L-subscribe-request@uni-karlsruhe.de #################





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