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From: TSS (216-119-132-80.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Human-eating pigs pose no health risk ? (CJD)
Date: October 30, 2004 at 11:22 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Human-eating pigs pose no health risk ?
Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 13:30:24 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Human-eating pigs pose no health risk

CP


VANCOUVER -- Pigs that may have eaten human remains at a B.C. farm
wouldn't have posed a risk to the food supply, health officials said in
a report made public this week. The pigs came from the farm partly owned
by accused serial killer Robert Pickton.

"It is believed that there is the possibility that human remains were
fed to pigs," says the report prepared earlier this year by a branch of
Health Canada.

"This poses no known risks to the food supply. The viruses ... -
hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis - do
not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
digestive system."

Pickton, 54, is charged with 15 counts of first-degree murder in the
disappearance of women from Vancouver's seedy Downtown Eastside. He is
expected to face another seven charges.

http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/EdmontonSun/News/2004/10/30/693122.html


B.C. pig farm's pork cleared

VANCOUVER (CP) - Pigs that may have eaten human remains at a Port
Coquitlam, B.C., farm wouldn't have posed a risk to the food supply,
health officials said in a report made public this week.

The pigs came from the farm partly owned by accused serial killer Robert
Pickton.

"It is believed that there is the possibility that human remains were
fed to pigs," says the report prepared earlier this year by a branch of
Health Canada.

"This poses no known risks to the food supply. The viruses . . . -
hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis - do
not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
digestive system."

The report, commissioned by the RCMP, became public this week after an
access-to-information request.

The report concluded that even if human remains from women who had
hepatitis or HIV were mixed with pork and then sold to customers, the
risk of contracting a disease would be "very low" to "infinitessimally
small."

In March of this year, B.C.'s provincial health officer said human DNA
may have been in meat processed for human consumption at a pig farm at
the centre of the investigation into Vancouver's missing women.

Dr. Perry Kendall stressed none of the meat would have been sold in
stores or been distributed widely. However, meat from the farm was given
to friends and associates of Pickton.

Kendall asked anyone who might still have frozen pork products from
Pickton's farm to give them to police.

The report acknowledged that several of the missing women known to have
been at the farm were HIV and-or hepatitis positive.

Pickton, 54, is charged with 15 counts of first-degree murder in the
disappearance of women from Vancouver's seedy Downtown Eastside. He is
expected to face an additional seven charges.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2004/10/29/692432-cp.html

Pigs from farm partly owned by Pickton did not pose risk: report

Vancouver Province (subscription), Canada - 17 hours ago
... hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis
-- do not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
digestive system.". ...

Pigs from farm partly owned by Pickton did not pose risk: report

Canada East, Canada - 18 hours ago
... hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis -
do not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
digestive system.". ...

Pigs from farm partly owned by Pickton did not pose risk: report

Vancouver Sun, Canada - 18 hours ago
... hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis
-- do not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
digestive system.". ...

Greetings,

> "It is believed that there is the possibility that human remains were
> fed to pigs," says the report prepared earlier this year by a branch
> of Health Canada.
>
> "This poses no known risks to the food supply. The viruses ... -
> hepatitis B and C, HIV and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tuberculosis -
> do not cross the species barrier and would be inactivated by the pig
> digestive system."
>


THIS is beyond stupid, just more lies. as remote as it would be for one
of the potential victims to have a TSE, why would Health Canada be
so foolish as to lie about transmission and inactivation of TSEs.

1: J Infect Dis 1980 Aug;142(2):205-8


Oral transmission of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie to
nonhuman primates.

Gibbs CJ Jr, Amyx HL, Bacote A, Masters CL, Gajdusek DC.

Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of humans and scrapie disease of
sheep and goats were transmitted to squirrel monkeys (Saimiri
sciureus) that were exposed to the infectious agents only by their
nonforced consumption of known infectious tissues. The asymptomatic
incubation period in the one monkey exposed to the virus of kuru was
36 months; that in the two monkeys exposed to the virus of
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was 23 and 27 months, respectively; and
that in the two monkeys exposed to the virus of scrapie was 25 and
32 months, respectively. Careful physical examination of the buccal
cavities of all of the monkeys failed to reveal signs or oral
lesions. One additional monkey similarly exposed to kuru has
remained asymptomatic during the 39 months that it has been under
observation.

PMID: 6997404

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=6997404&dopt=Abstract

> and would be inactivated by the pig digestive system."
>

THE pig digestive system would not inactivate the TSE agent;

New studies on the heat resistance of hamster-adapted scrapie agent:
Threshold survival after ashing at 600°C suggests an inorganic template
of replication

Paul Brown*, [dagger ] , Edward H. Rau [Dagger ] , Bruce K. Johnson*,
Alfred E. Bacote*, Clarence J. Gibbs Jr.*, and D. Carleton Gajdusek§

* Laboratory of Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and [Dagger ] Environmental
Protection Branch, Division of Safety, Office of Research Services,
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; and § Institut Alfred
Fessard, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91198 Gif sur
Yvette, France

Contributed by D. Carleton Gajdusek, December 22, 1999

Abstract

One-gram samples from a pool of crude brain tissue from hamsters
infected with the 263K strain of hamster-adapted scrapie agent were
placed in covered quartz-glass crucibles and exposed for either 5 or 15
min to dry heat at temperatures ranging from 150°C to 1,000°C. Residual
infectivity in the treated samples was assayed by the intracerebral
inoculation of dilution series into healthy weanling hamsters, which
were observed for 10 months; disease transmissions were verified by
Western blot testing for proteinase-resistant protein in brains from
clinically positive hamsters. Unheated control tissue contained 9.9
log10LD50/g tissue; after exposure to 150°C, titers equaled or exceeded
6 log10LD50/g, and after exposure to 300°C, titers equaled or exceeded 4
log10LD50/g. Exposure to 600°C completely ashed the brain samples,
which, when reconstituted with saline to their original weights,
transmitted disease to 5 of 35 inoculated hamsters. No transmissions
occurred after exposure to 1,000°C. These results suggest that an
inorganic molecular template with a decomposition point near 600°C is
capable of nucleating the biological replication of the scrapie agent.

transmissible spongiform encephalopathy | scrapie | prion | medical
waste | incineration

Introduction......snip.......end
=========================

The neuropathology of experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy
in the pig.

Ryder SJ, Hawkins SA, Dawson M, Wells GA.

Veterinary Laboratories Agency Weybridge, Woodham Lane, New Haw,
Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB, UK.

In an experimental study of the transmissibility of BSE to the pig,
seven of 10 pigs, infected at 1-2 weeks of age by multiple-route
parenteral inoculation with a homogenate of bovine brain from
natural BSE cases developed lesions typical of spongiform
encephalopathy. The lesions consisted principally of severe neuropil
vacuolation affecting most areas of the brain, but mainly the
forebrain. In addition, some vacuolar change was identified in the
rostral colliculi and hypothalamic areas of normal control pigs. PrP
accumulations were detected immunocytochemically in the brains of
BSE-infected animals. PrP accumulation was sparse in many areas and
its density was not obviously related to the degree of vacuolation.
The patterns of PrP immunolabelling in control pigs differed
strikingly from those in the infected animals.

PMID: 10684682 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?holding=npg&cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10684682&dopt=Abstract

TSS





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