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From: TSS (216-119-129-78.ipset9.wt.net)
Subject: Re: FIRST IRISH vCJD & CASE CJD case sparks beef fears
Date: October 29, 2004 at 12:51 pm PST

In Reply to: FIRST IRISH vCJD & CASE CJD case sparks beef fears posted by TSS on October 24, 2004 at 1:35 pm:

PRION DISEASE SUSPECTED

------------------------------------------------------------------------
A possible victim of CJD victim could have been infected 15 years ago.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

If a suspected case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a man in
Ireland is confirmed, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland believes he
may have become infected 10-15 years ago from the consumption of
contaminated beef products in Ireland.

The FSAI said that this timeframe would be the typical incubation period
for the disease. The Authority stressed that bovine spongiform
encephalopathy controls in place in Ireland since 1996, are very strict
and there are layers of robust control measures to ensure maximum
consumer protection in relation to BSE.

Dr. John OBrien, chief executive at FSAI said that the incidence of BSE
in Ireland continues to decline in the cattle population, demonstrating
that the controls introduced in 1996 and 1997 are working. There are
fewer cases of BSE and the vast majority of current cases are in animals
born before the introduction of these enhanced controls.

The main consumer protection measure has been the removal of specified
risk material from the human food chain, he said. SRM are the parts of
an animal most likely to contain BSE infectivity if that animal is
incubating the disease. This SRM removal is supervised on a day to day
basis by veterinary inspectors. We are confident that the controls in
place are ensuring SRM removal and thus consumers are being protected.
The FSAI and the Department of Agriculture and Food have been to the
forefront in the EU with the most aggressive controls to protect both
animals and humans from the BSE agent.

He emphasized: The FSAI, DAF, and the other agencies involved in
policing the food chain are working closely together to ensure full
compliance and maximum consumer protection. In fact, one of the key
factors for establishing the FSAI in 1996 was the BSE crisis. We base
our decisions upon the best scientific data and knowledge, and develop
inspection and audit controls to ensure maximum consumer protection in
relation to meat and meat products. A rigorous policy of safeguards is
now firmly established throughout the food chain. OBrien said that the
FSAIs BSE Scientific Sub-committee continuously reviews these controls
and over the past five years has recommended additional control measures
when appropriate.

We believe that the controls are proving to be effective, but public
confidence can only be maintained through continued vigilance and
transparency. The FSAI will continue to be the over-arching watchdog and
will sustain its independent audits of the current controls on an
ongoing basis. We are confident that based on current controls,
consumers of Irish beef are not being exposed to the BSE infective
agent, he said.

In Ireland, there is a sequence of controls for BSE along the food
chain. The feeding of meat and bone meal is prohibited to all farm
animals and there are stringent controls at rendering plants and feed
mills. All cattle are examined by veterinary inspectors before slaughter
at the abattoir and rapid BSE testing is carried out on all animals over
30 months of age. Veterinary inspectors, under service contract to the
FSAI, ensure slaughtered cattle have had SRM removed. At boning plants,
the carcasses are inspected again. In butcher shops, environmental
health officers under contract to the FSAI inspect carcasses at this
level. In addition, all butchers operating in Ireland are aware that it
is illegal to sell meat products containing SRM.

Web posted: November 9, 2004
Category: Food Safety,Research
harris@wattpub.demon.co.uk

------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.meatnews.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=PArticle&artNum=8445

Greetings,

> All cattle are examined by veterinary inspectors before slaughter at
> the abattoir and rapid BSE testing is carried out on all animals over
> 30 months of age.


NOT GOOD ENOUGH !

Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA [takes a few minutes to load]


"Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

11/03/2003 01:19 PM


To:

regulations@aphis.usda.gov

cc:


bcc:


Subject:

Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


I would like to kindly comment on Docket No. 03-080-1

USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL IMPORTS FROM CANADA ;

>Under this proposal, ruminant and ruminant products eligible for entry into
>the United States from a BSE minimal risk region would include:
>
>1) bovine
>animals less than 30 months of age for immediate slaughter;
>
>2) bovine
>animals for feeding to be moved to a designated feedlot and then to
>slaughter at less than 30 months of age;
>
snip...

>6) fresh (chilled or frozen)
>meat from bovines less than 30 months of age; 7) fresh (chilled or frozen)
>whole or half carcasses of bovines less than 30 months of age; 8) fresh
>(chilled or frozen) bovine liver; 9) fresh (chilled or frozen) bovine
>tongues;


the myth that cattle under 30 months of age are free from BSE/TSE is
just that, a myth,
and it's a false myth !

the youngest age of BSE case to date is 20 months old; As at: 31 May
2003 Year of onset Age youngest case (mnths) Age 2nd youngest case
(mnths) Age 2nd oldest case (yrs.mnths) Age oldest case (yrs.mnths) 1986
30 33 5.03 5.07 1987 30 31 9.09 10.00 1988 24 27 10.02 11.01(2) 1989 21
24(4) 12.00(2) 15.04 1990 24(2) 26 13.03 14.00 1991 24 26(3) 14.02 17.05
1992 20 26 15.02 16.02 1993 29 30(3) 14.10 18.10 1994 30(2) 31(2) 14.05
16.07 1995 24 32 14.09 15.05 1996 29 30 15.07 17.02 1997 37(7) 38(3)
14.09 15.01 1998 34 36 14.07 15.05 1999 39(2) 41 13.07 13.10 2000 40 42
17.08 19.09 2001 48(2) 56 14.10 14.11 2002 51 52 15.08 15.09(2) 2003 50
62 11.11 14.11

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/bse-statistics/bse/yng-old.html

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/index.html

The implications of the Swiss result for Britain, which has had the most
BSE, are complex. Only cattle aged 30 months or younger are eaten in
Britain, on the assumption, based on feeding trials, that cattle of that
age, even if they were infected as calves, have not yet accumulated
enough prions to be infectious. But the youngest cow to develop BSE on
record in Britain was 20 months old, showing some are fast incubators.
Models predict that 200-300 cattle under 30 months per year are infected
with BSE and enter the food chain currently in Britain. Of these 3-5
could be fast incubators and carrying detectable quantities of prion.


http://www.sare.org/htdocs/hypermail/html-home/28-html/0359.html

snip...

https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/BSEFrameset?OpenFrameSet&Frame=BottomFrame&Src=_25t156hb3dtmisrjjconjcc9n6ph6ccr66oqjgdpo74qm6e1l68qjcp9hc4o30dhgckq34phfc8rjgoj16orjep9ic8o66c9i64s3achl6pi68cpg60r38eb675i3ujrgcln48rr3elmmarjk4p0nat3f8pp62rb5cg0_


MRC-43-00 [ ] [Text only version of this site] [Print this page]
Issued: Monday, 28 August 2000
NEW EVIDENCE OF SUB-CLINICAL PRION INFECTION: IMPORTANT RESEARCH
FINDINGS RELEVANT TO CJD AND BSE

A team of researchers led by Professor John Collinge at the Medical
Research Council Prion Unit1 report today in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences, on new evidence for the existence of a
?sub-clinical? form of BSE in mice which was unknown until now.

The scientists took a closer look at what is known as the ?species
barrier? - the main protective factor which limits the ability of
prions2 to jump from one species to infect another. They found the mice
had a ?sub-clinical? form of disease where they carried high levels of
infectivity but did not develop the clinical disease during their normal
lifespan. The idea that individuals can carry a disease and show no
clinical symptoms is not new. It is commonly seen in conventional
infectious diseases.

Researchers tried to infect laboratory mice with hamster prions3 called
Sc237 and found that the mice showed no apparent signs of disease.
However, on closer inspection they found that the mice had high levels
of mouse prions in their brains. This was surprising because it has
always been assumed that hamster prions could not cause the disease in
mice, even when injected directly into the brain.

In addition the researchers showed that this new sub-clinical infection
could be easily passed on when injected into healthy mice and hamsters.

The height of the species barrier varies widely between different
combinations of animals and also varies with the type or strain of
prions. While some barriers are quite small (for instance BSE easily
infects mice), other combinations of strain and species show a seemingly
impenetrable barrier. Traditionally, the particular barrier studied here
was assumed to be robust.

Professor John Collinge said: "These results have a number of important
implications. They suggest that we should re-think how we measure
species barriers in the laboratory, and that we should not assume that
just because one species appears resistant to a strain of prions they
have been exposed to, that they do not silently carry the infection.
This research raises the possibility, which has been mentioned before,
that apparently healthy cattle could harbour, but never show signs of, BSE.

"This is a timely and unexpected result, increasing what we know about
prion disease. These new findings have important implications for those
researching prion disease, those responsible for preventing infected
material getting into the food chain and for those considering how best
to safeguard health and reduce the risk that theoretically, prion
disease could be contracted through medical and surgical procedures."

ISSUED FRIDAY 25 AUGUST UNDER EMBARGO. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE EMBARGO IS
SET BY THE JOURNAL.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE MRC PRESS OFFICE ON 020 7637 6011
(OFFICE HOURS) OR 07818 428297 OR 0385 774357 (OUT-OF-OFFICE-HOURS) OR
PROFESSOR JOHN COLLINGE ON 020 7594 3760. PLEASE NOTE THAT OWING TO
TRAVEL COMMITMENTS PROFESSOR COLLINGE WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE UNTIL 16.30
ON FRIDAY 25 AUGUST AND CONTACTABLE AGAIN ON MONDAY 28 AUGUST VIA THE
MRC PRESS OFFICE. DR ANDREW HILL (A CO-AUTHOR ON THE PAPER) FROM THE
DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE WILL BE AVAILABLE
ON 00 61 3 8344 3995 (DURING OFFICE HOURS) OR 00 61 3 9443 0009
(OUT-OF-OFFICE HOURS). PLEASE NOTE THAT AUSTRALIA IS TEN HOURS AHEAD OF
UK TIME.

NOTES FOR EDITORS

Professor Collinge is a consultant neurologist and Director of the newly
formed MRC Prion Unit based at The Imperial College School of Medicine
at St Mary?s Hospital. He is also a member of the UK Government?s
Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee (SEAC). The MRC prion unit
is was set up in 1999, and its work includes molecular genetic studies
of human prion disease and transgenic modelling of human prion diseases.

Prions are unique infectious agents that cause fatal brain diseases such
as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie and BSE (mad
cow disease) in animals. In some circumstances prions from one species
of animals can infect another and it is clear that BSE has done this to
cause the disease variant CJD in the UK and France. It remains unclear
how large an epidemic of variant CJD will occur over the years ahead.

The strain of prion used here to infect the mice is the Sc237 strain
(also known as 263K) which infects hamsters, and until now was assumed
not to infect mice.

This research was funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust.

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is a national organisation funded by
the UK tax-payer. Its business is medical research aimed at improving
human health; everyone stands to benefit from the outputs. The research
it supports and the scientists it trains meet the needs of the health
services, the pharmaceutical and other health-related industries and the
academic world. MRC has funded work which has led to some of the most
significant discoveries and achievements in medicine in the UK. About
half of the MRC?s expenditure of £345 million is invested in over 50 of
its Institutes and Units, where it employs its own research staff. The
remaining half goes in the form of grant support and training awards to
individuals and teams in universities and medical schools.

The Wellcome Trust is the world's largest medical research charity with
a spend of some £600 million in the current financial year 1999/2000.
The Wellcome Trust supports more than 5,000 researchers, at 400
locations, in 42 different countries to promote and foster research with
the aim of improving human and animal health. As well as funding major
initiatives in the public understanding of science, the Wellcome Trust
is the country's leading supporter of research into the history of medicine.

©2002 Medical Research Council

http://www.mrc.ac.uk/index/public_interest/public-press_office/public-press_releases_2000/public-mrc-43-00.htm

TSS





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