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From: TSS (wt-d6-140.wt.net)
Subject: Re: Japan is confirming its 14th case of mad cow disease
Date: October 20, 2004 at 1:25 pm PST

In Reply to: Japan is confirming its 14th case of mad cow disease posted by TSS on October 14, 2004 at 7:38 am:

Japanese Confirm 14th Case Of BSE

Wednesday 20th October 2004

Japan has confirmed its 14th case of BSE.

Japan reported its first case of BSE in late 2001. The discovery of yet another case of BSE this year underscores concerns about the disease as Tokyo mulls relaxing cattle-testing standards that could allow the resumption of US beef imports.

The latest case was discovered amid continuing talks between the United States and Japan aimed at lifting Tokyo's eight-month ban on US beef imports from what had been their most lucrative overseas market. Japan, Korea, and other countries closed its markets to US beef last December when US authorities found the first and only case of BSE in the United States.

Japan has been reconsidering its policy that all cattle slaughtered for meat must be tested for BSE. This policy is a major sticking point in the negotiations. While Tokyo says it wants to resolve the dispute, it maintains that its first priority is food safety.

The most recent BSE-infected animal in Japan was a Holstein cow in northern Japan. It was Japan's second BSE case in less than a month. The four-year-old cow from the town of Shikaoi was found dead and experts who tested the animal confirmed that it had BSE, Agriculture Ministry official, Hiroaki Ogura, said. An eight-year-old dairy cow in western Japan was confirmed to have the disease three weeks ago.

Officials are tracing the feed that the Hokkaido cow had been fed and other details about its recent habits. The use of rendered ruminant by-products in cattle feed has been linked to previous outbreaks. Around 220 other cattle are being monitored at the same farm to keep the illness from spreading.
http://www.farminglife.com/story/4186TSS






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