SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS (216-119-132-20.ipset12.wt.net)
Subject: Identification of central nervous system genes involved in the host response to the scrapie agent during preclinical and clinical infection
Date: October 13, 2004 at 1:52 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Identification of central nervous system genes involved in the host response to the scrapie agent during preclinical and clinical infection
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 15:58:42 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

Identification of central nervous system genes involved in the host
response to the scrapie agent during preclinical and clinical infection

Stephanie Booth1, Christopher Bowman2, Richard Baumgartner2, Garrett
Sorensen1, Catherine Robertson1, Michael Coulthart1, Clark Phillipson1
and Rajmund L. Somorjai2

1 Division of Host Genetics and Prion Diseases, National Microbiology
Laboratory, Health Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3E 3R2
2 Institute for Biodiagnostics, National Research Council Canada,
Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3B 1Y6

Correspondence
Stephanie Booth
Stephanie_Booth@hc-sc.gc.ca

Genes that are expressed differentially in the central nervous system of
mice during infection with mouse-adapted scrapie agents were identified
in this study. cDNA microarrays were used to examine gene-expression
profiles at early, middle (preclinical) and late (clinical) time points
after inoculation. A number of genes that showed significant changes in
expression during the clinical stage of disease were identified. Of
these, 138 were upregulated and 20 were downregulated. A smaller number
of genes showed differential expression at the early and middle stages
of the disease time course. These genes are interesting, as they may
reflect biological processes that are involved in the molecular
pathogenesis of the prion agent. At present, little is known about the
early events in the disease process that trigger neurodegeneration.
Perhaps most interestingly, one group of genes that exhibited decreased
expression in all tested stages of the disease was identified in this
study. This cluster included four transcripts representing
haematopoietic system-related genes, which suggests that the
haematopoietic system is involved in the disease process from an early
stage.

Raw data and a hyperlinked version of Table 1 are available as
supplementary material in JGV Online.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/85/11/3459?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=prion&searchid=1097700246431_1433&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=0&volume=85&issue=11&search_url=http%3A%2F%2Fvir.sgmjournals.org%2Fcgi%2Fsearchtss

OTHER AGENTS:
Chan-Lan Kim, Ayako Karino, Naotaka Ishiguro, Morikazu Shinagawa,
Motoyoshi Sato, and Motohiro Horiuchi
Cell-surface retention of PrPC by anti-PrP antibody prevents
protease-resistant PrP formation
J. Gen. Virol., Nov 2004; 85: 3473 - 3482.
...The C-terminal portion of the prion protein (PrP), corresponding to a
protease-resistant core fragment of the abnormal isoform of the prion...
...protein (PrP Sc ), is essential for prion propagation....TSS
Journal Home
Abstract


Full Text


PDF


Home page

OTHER AGENTS:
Yutaka Kikuchi, Tomoshi Kakeya, Ayako Sakai, Kosuke Takatori, Naoto
Nakamura, Haruo Matsuda, Takeshi Yamazaki, Ken-ichi Tanamoto, and
Jun-ichi Sawada
Propagation of a protease-resistant form of prion protein in long-term
cultured human glioblastoma cell line T98G
J. Gen. Virol., Nov 2004; 85: 3449 - 3457.
...Human prion diseases, such as CreutzfeldtJakob disease (CJD), a
lethal, neurodegenerative condition, occur in sporadic, genetic and...
...CJD is associated with the conversion of normal cellular prion
protein (PrP C ) into a protease-resistant isoform (PrP res )....






Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: