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From: TSS (216-119-143-39.ipset23.wt.net)
Subject: Secretary Ann Veneman FLIP-FLOPPING around with BSE again
Date: September 18, 2004 at 11:36 am PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Secretary Ann Veneman FLIP-FLOPPING around with BSE again
Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 09:11:07 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


##################### Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy #####################

Veneman Says U.S., Japan Haven't Agreed Yet on Beef Proposal

Sept. 17 (Bloomberg) -- U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said the
U.S. hasn't agreed yet with Japan on a proposal to allow imports of beef
to Japan from U.S. cattle younger than 21 months old.

Veneman told reporters at a conference of beef producers in Aldie,
Virginia, that U.S. efforts to resume more than $1.5 billion of beef
shipments to Japan are making progress. ``We've been working very hard
on it, and we're not there yet,'' she said.

Japanese made a proposal on younger animals on Sept. 10 in an effort to
end its ban on all beef from U.S. cattle since the discovery of a single
case of mad cow disease in Washington state in late December, the Nikkei
English News said on Sept. 13, citing unidentified government officials.

Veneman declined to comment on whether U.S. President George W. Bush and
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi would sign an agreement on
beef trade when the two meet in New York on Sept. 21.

``I don't think the president is going to be negotiating this issue,''
Veneman said. ``It's going to be done by the negotiators.''

More than $3.8 billion in U.S. beef exports were halted following the
disclosure of the mad cow case. Japan, the largest buyer of U.S. beef,
has said it wants assurances that U.S. beef is free of disease.

Mad cow, also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE,
produces a lethal human variant, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, blamed for more than
140 deaths, mostly in Britain.


http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000101&sid=auUC1ZbxIuFY&refer=japan

To contact the reporter on this story:
Daniel Goldstein in Aldie at dgoldstein1@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Steve Stroth at sstroth@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated: September 17, 2004 15:28 EDT

==================================


> U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said the U.S. hasn't agreed yet
> with Japan on a proposal to allow imports of beef to Japan from U.S.
> cattle younger than 21 months old.
>

speaking of flip-flopping ;

Beef News
Japan denies progress made in beef trade talks

by Brendan O'Neill on 8/31/04 for
Meatingplace.com

Last Thursday, Department of Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman told
reporters that the three rounds of meetings Japan and the United States
held in late July were going fairly smoothly.

"We have concluded out of those technical discussions that we will move
forward with an arrangement with the Japanese where they will not
require testing of all ages of animals," she said.

"That is not factual," Mamoru Ishihara, vice minister of agriculture,
forestry and fisheries, said in a news conference after hearing
Veneman's remarks.

"We have not yet determined what to do with Japan-U.S. negotiations,
including setting a schedule for further talks," said Ishihara.

http://www.meatingplace.com/DailyNews/init.asp?iID=12965

Gray launched his study with plans to address the first question by
assessing "tens or even hundreds of pathways" by which the infection
might enter the United States, according to agency notes from a public
meeting Sept. 28, 1998.

As Gray's team searched for answers, the researchers found a world of
unknowns. The United States had banned imports of cattle and byproducts
from the United Kingdom and Europe by 1997. But foreign governments had
no data tracking illegal shipments, so the researchers could not measure
whether U.S. defenses were adequate.

"Harvard didn't assign risk to the pathways in," said Linda Detwiler, a
senior agency veterinarian who advised Veneman until August 2003. "They
just assumed it came in. And we were very cognizant that they did that."

With the blessing of agency officials, the Harvard researchers shifted
focus to the second question. They studied the U.S. "feed ban," which
prohibits use of rendered cattle protein in feed, and they developed a
computer model to mimic its impact on herd health.

Although the model did not measure the risk of entry as Veneman
indicated, it did produce a breakthrough conclusion: Even if mad cow
entered the country undetected, the feed ban would halt spread of the
disease and eliminate it within 20 years.

But where science was uncertain, Veneman said: "I am pleased to report
that using complex mathematical models, the study found that the risk of
BSE entering this country is extremely low."

Two warnings..............


Harvard study couldn't assess the risk of entry

The lead researcher told an official he couldn't rule out a chance
infected cattle had entered the U.S.
Monday, May 03, 2004

http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/108358541283690.xml

bought and paid for ($800,000) by your local cattle dealer;

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/oa/topics/BSE_Peer_Review.pdf suppressed peer
review of Harvard study October 31, 2002

TSS

################# BSE-L-subscribe-request@uni-karlsruhe.de #################





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