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From: TSS (216-119-144-8.ipset24.wt.net)
Subject: The risk of accidental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: identification of emerging issues
Date: August 24, 2004 at 2:46 pm PST

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: The risk of accidental transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: identification of emerging issues
Date: Mon, 23 Aug 2004 21:28:28 -0500
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
To: BSE-L@UNI-KARLSRUHE.DE


Public Health


Volume 118, Issue 6

, September 2004, Pages 409-420


Review


The risk of accidental transmission of transmissible spongiform
encephalopathy: identification of emerging issues

I. RamasamyE-mail The Corresponding Author


Department of Chemical Pathology, Newham General Hospital, Glen Road,
Plaistow, London E13 8RU, UK

Received 14 April 2003; Revised 11 December 2003; accepted 11 December
2003. Available online 9 April 2004.


Abstract

The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), thought to be
caused by prions, are fatal neurodegenerative disorders of humans and
animals. Despite their rarity, human prion diseases have received
prominence because the consumption of prion-contaminated meat from
cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is thought to be
responsible for the emergence of variant CreutzfeldtJakob disease
(vCJD) in humans. Clinical criteria for the diagnosis of vCJD is now
available. Recent, more startling evidence suggests that the clinical
presentation of vCJD may vary and that patients may present as classical
(sporadic) CJD or may have subclinical infection and be apparently
healthy. These patients may still pose a risk of iatrogenic transmission
through surgical or medical (blood transfusion) procedures. The aim of
future work is to develop preclinical screening tests for the
identification of infected but still healthy individuals. The future
course of vCJD is still uncertain. Modelling studies to predict the
cases of vCJD depend on the date of origin of BSE and time of infection,
which is, at best, only approximated. As the number of cases of BSE in
the UK declines, the risk of BSE in other countries from imported cattle
or meat and bone meal from the UK has been increasing. It is also
recognized that other animal species (farmed, domestic and wild animals)
other than cows are susceptible to TSEs. The possibility of interspecies
transmission of TSEs and the global presence of the disease suggests a
need for a co-ordinated worldwide risk management approach to eradicate
TSEs.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B73H6-4C468C0-1&_coverDate=09%2F30%2F2004&_alid=195290127&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_qd=1&_cdi=11546&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=38950109bdc555216acd99784cd3c88e

TSS






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