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From: TSS ()
Subject: Kansan contracts disease related to mad cow ?
Date: January 15, 2008 at 1:04 pm PST

Kansan contracts disease related to mad cow

BY KAREN SHIDELER

The Wichita Eagle

Health officials think a Kansas man has died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a
rare disease that affects the central nervous system and turns brain tissue
spongy.

One variation of the disease is the so-called mad cow disease but the human
form of that has never been seen in the United States in someone who hadn't
had exposure elsewhere.

Because the incubation period for the disease is years or even decades,
health officials don't know how or when the Kansas man got the disease, nor
what its source may have been.

They won't know for several weeks, until testing is complete, which form of
the disease he had.

The man died Friday at Wesley Medical Center, where he had been a patient
since December. His name was not released, but he was a 53-year-old from the
Colby area.

The diagnosis at this time is Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, or CJD, said Wesley
spokesman Paul Petitte. The only way to confirm CJD is through testing of
brain tissue, which will be done through the National Prion Disease
Pathology Surveillance Center.

Kansas has an average of three CJD cases a year, according to Joe Blubaugh,
spokesman for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one
to two people per million have a spontaneous case of CJD each year. On
average, 250 to 300 cases of CJD are reported annually.

In addition to the spontaneous cases, a certain form of CJD can come from
consumption of beef that has been infected with mad cow disease, as happened
in Great Britain in the mid-1990s. The United States and other countries
implemented various measures in response, to prevent the disease and better
track infected cattle.

CJD can also come from blood transfusions, and it can be hereditary in very
rare cases.

Richard Liepins, who was the attending physician in the local case, said,
"We have no idea of how he possibly contracted this."

The man worked in a meatpacking plant "quite a few years ago" and was also
an elk hunter, Liepins said, though there's no way to say whether either of
those contributed to his disease.

Chronic wasting disease, found in some deer and elk, is another form of
spongiform encephalopathy. It can be spread from animal to animal, but so
far there's no strong evidence of its transmission to humans.

The CDC said studies are under way to see whether people exposed to the meat
of sick deer and elk are at increased risk for CJD but because of the long
incubation period that won't be known for years. Hunters and others are
advised to avoid meat from animals that seem sick or test positive for
chronic wasting disease.

The disease is rare enough that Liepins and some of the other doctors who
worked on the case had never seen it before. Tom Moore, an infectious
disease specialist in Wichita, said he has seen about three cases over the
past decade.

When the man first became ill doctors suspected a brain tumor, Liepins said,
because of his neurological symptoms. Such symptoms include personality
changes, other mental changes and dementia, which are also among the
symptoms of CJD.

Liepins said he wouldn't speculate on the most likely cause of the man's
disease, but he said there is no reason for concern among the general
public.

"It's a rare disease that people can contract at any time, but it's rare --
it's very rare," he said.

Reach Karen Shideler at 316-268-6674 or kshideler@wichitaeagle.com.


http://www.kansas.com/news/updates/story/281275.html

> Liepins said he wouldn't speculate on the most likely cause of the man's
disease,


> but he said there is no reason for concern among the general public.


???

CJD FARMERS WIFE 1989

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/10/13007001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1989/10/13003001.pdf


20 year old died from sCJD in USA in 1980 and a 16 year
old in 1981. A 19 year old died from sCJD in
France in 1985. There is no evidence of an iatrogenic
cause for those cases....

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/04004001.pdf

cover-up of 4th farm worker ???

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/23006001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/20006001.pdf

CONFIRMATION OF CJD IN FOURTH FARMER

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/11/03008001.pdf

now story changes from;

SEAC concluded that, if the fourth case were confirmed, it would be
worrying, especially as all four farmers with CJD would have had BSE
cases on their farms.

to;

This is not unexpected...

was another farmer expected?

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/11/13010001.pdf

4th farmer, and 1st teenager

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1996/02/27003001.pdf

2. snip...
Over a 5 year period, which is the time period on which the advice
from Professor Smith and Dr. Gore was based, and assuming a
population of 120,000 dairy farm workers, and an annual incidence
of 1 per million cases of CJD in the general population, a
DAIRY FARM WORKER IS 5 TIMES MORE LIKELY THAN
an individual in the general population to develop CJD. Using the
actual current annual incidence of CJD in the UK of 0.7 per
million, this figure becomes 7.5 TIMES.

3. You will recall that the advice provided by Professor Smith in
1993 and by Dr. Gore this month used the sub-population of dairy
farm workers who had had a case of BSE on their farms -
63,000, which is approximately half the number of dairy farm
workers - as a denominator. If the above sums are repeated using
this denominator population, taking an annual incidence in the general
population of 1 per million the observed rate in this sub-population
is 10 TIMES, and taking an annual incidence of 0.7 per million,

IT IS 15 TIMES (THE ''WORST CASE'' SCENARIO) than
that in the general population...


http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/01/31004001.pdf

CJD YOUNG PEOPLE

in the USA, a 16 year old in 1978;

ALSO IN USA;

(20 year old died from sCJD in USA in 1980 and a 16 year
old in 1981. see second url below)

in France, a 19 year old in 1982;

in Canada, a 14 year old of UK origin in 1988;

in Poland, cases in people aged 19, 23, and 27 were identified in
a retrospective study (published 1991), having been originally
misdiagnosed with a viral encephalitis;

Creutzfeldt's first patient in 1923 was aged 23.

there you have it........TSS

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/27013001.pdf

20 year old died from sCJD in USA in 1980 and a 16 year
old in 1981. A 19 year old died from sCJD in
France in 1985. There is no evidence of an iatrogenic
cause for those cases....

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1995/10/04004001.pdf


Friday, January 11, 2008

CJD HUMAN TSE REPORT UK, USA, CANADA, and Mexico JANUARY 2008


http://cjdmadcowbaseoct2007.blogspot.com/2008/01/cjd-human-tse-report-uk-usa-canada-and.html


Saturday, January 12, 2008

Prominent and Persistent Extraneural Infection in Human PrP Transgenic Mice
Infected with Variant CJD

http://cjdmadcowbaseoct2007.blogspot.com/2008/01/prominent-and-persistent-extraneural.html


ANIMAL HEALTH REPORT 2006 (BSE h-BASE ALABAMA)

http://animalhealthreport2006.blogspot.com/


SEAC 99th meeting on Friday 14th December 2007

http://seac992007.blogspot.com/


BSE BASE MAD COW TESTING TEXAS, USA, AND CANADA, A REVIEW OF SORTS

http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/


MADCOW USDA the untold story

http://madcowusda.blogspot.com/


BSE OIE USDA

http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/2008/01/bse-oie-usda.html


CREUTZFELDT JAKOB DISEASE MAD COW BASE UPDATE USA

http://cjdmadcowbaseoct2007.blogspot.com/


SCRAPIE USA

http://scrapie-usa.blogspot.com/


NOR-98 ATYPICAL SCRAPIE CASES USA

http://nor-98.blogspot.com/


Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy TME

http://transmissible-mink-encephalopathy.blogspot.com/


CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/


Monitoring the occurrence of emerging forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in
the United States

http://cjdusa.blogspot.com/


CJD QUESTIONNAIRE

http://cjdquestionnaire.blogspot.com/


TSEAC MEETINGS

http://tseac.blogspot.com/


I only ponder how many sporadic CJDs in the USA are type 2 PrPSc?

http://www.neurology.org/cgi/eletters/60/2/176#535


THE PATHOLOGICAL PROTEIN
Hardcover, 304 pages plus photos and illustrations.
ISBN 0-387-95508-9 June 2003
BY Philip Yam

CHAPTER 14 LAYING ODDS

Answering critics like Terry Singeltary, who feels that the U.S.
under-counts CJD, Schonberger conceded that the current surveillance system
has errors but stated that most of the errors will be confined to the older
population.

http://www.thepathologicalprotein.com/


doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(03)00715-1Copyright © 2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Newsdesk

Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America

Xavier Bosch

Available online 29 July 2003.
Volume 3, Issue 8, August 2003, Page 463

"My name is Terry S Singeltary Sr, and I live in Bacliff, Texas. I lost my
mom to hvCJD (Heidenhain variant CJD) and have been searching for answers
ever since. What I have found is that we have not been told the truth. CWD
in deer and elk is a small portion of a much bigger problem." ...

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473309903007151/fulltext

http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/1473-3099/PIIS1473309903007151.pdf


Diagnosis and Reporting of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Singeltary, Sr et al. JAMA.2001; 285: 733-734.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/http://www.neurology.org/cgi/eletters/60/2/176#535


Like lambs to the slaughter
31 March 2001
Debora MacKenzie
Magazine issue 2284


FOUR years ago, Terry Singeltary watched his mother die horribly from a
degenerative brain disease. Doctors told him it was Alzheimer's, but
Singeltary was suspicious. The diagnosis didn't fit her violent symptoms,
and he demanded an autopsy. It showed she had died of sporadic
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Most doctors believe that sCJD is caused by a
prion protein deforming by chance into a killer. But Singeltary thinks
otherwise. He is one of a number of campaigners who say that some sCJD, like
the variant CJD related to BSE, is caused by eating meat from infected
animals. Their suspicions have focused on sheep carrying scrapie, a BSE-like
disease that is wide spread in flocks across Europe and North America. Now
scientists in France have stumbled across new evidence that adds weight to
the campaigners' fears. To their complete surprise, the researchers found
that one strain of scrapie causes the same brain damage in mice as sCJD.
"This means we cannot rule out that at least some sCJD may be caused by some
strains of scrapie," says team member Jean-Philippe Deslys of the French
Atomic Energy Commission's medical research laboratory in
Fontenay-aux-Roses, south-west of Paris. Hans Kretschmar of the University
of Göttingen, who coordinates CJD surveillance in Germany, is so concerned
by the findings that he now wants to trawl back through past sCJD cases to
see if any might have been caused by eating infected mutton or lamb. ...

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg16922840.300-like-lambs-to-the-slaughter.html


DER SPIEGEL (9/2001) - 24.02.2001 (9397 Zeichen)USA: Loch in der MauerDie
BSE-Angst erreicht Amerika: Trotz strikter Auflagen gelangte in
Texasverbotenes Tiermehl ins Rinderfutter - die Kontrollen der
Aufsichtsbehördensind lax. Link auf diesen Artikel im Archiv:
http://service.spiegel.de/digas/find?DID=18578755"

Its as full of holes as Swiss Cheese" says Terry Singeltary of the FDA
regulations. ...

http://service.spiegel.de/digas/servlet/find/DID=18578755


Thu Dec 6, 2007 11:38

FDA IN CRISIS MODE, AMERICAN LIVES AT RISK

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/fs/food-disease/news/dec0407fda.html


FDA SCIENCE AND MISSION AT RISK

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/07/briefing/2007-4329b_02_01_FDA%20Report%20on%20Science%20and%20Technology.pdf


2 January 2000
British Medical Journal

U.S. Scientist should be concerned with a CJD epidemic in the U.S., as well

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/320/7226/8/b#6117


15 November 1999
British Medical Journal

vCJD in the USA * BSE in U.S.

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/319/7220/1312/b#5406


BSE (Mad Cow) Update: Do Reports of sCJD Clusters Matter?

snip... see full text ;

http://cjdtexas.blogspot.com/


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518





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