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From: TSS ()
Subject: FDA's Animal Feed Safety System (AFSS) Project Plans Update #3 DEAD IN WATER FOR NOW
Date: July 6, 2007 at 7:27 am PST

FDA's Animal Feed Safety System (AFSS) Project Plans Update #3
Developing regulations

The work of the Center for Veterinary Medicine’s Animal Feed Safety System
(AFSS) Team is guided by a Framework Document, first drafted in 2005 and
revised in December 2006. One of the gaps presented in the AFSS Framework
Document is the need for a more comprehensive animal feed safety program in
the United States.

To address that gap, the AFSS Team has begun to write process control
regulations covering the procurement, receipt, manufacture, and distribution
of all animal feed, including pet food, and feed ingredients.

Before the regulations can be proposed in the FederalRegister, the Agency is
required to consider, among other things, the likely regulatory, paperwork,
small business, economic, and environmental impacts resulting from the
regulations. Thus, the AFSS Team does not envision the proposed regulations
being available for public comment until calendar year 2008.


snip.....

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/UpdateIII.htm


figures! so we can expect more of the same ;


QUESTION, IS U.S.A. FOOD PRODUCTION SYSTEM POISONING US ?

What Do We Feed to Food-Production Animals? A Review of Animal Feed
Ingredients and Their Potential Impacts on Human Health


Amy R. Sapkota,1,2 Lisa Y. Lefferts,1,3 Shawn McKenzie,1 and Polly Walker1
1Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Bloomberg School of Public
Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2Maryland Institute for
Applied Environmental Health, College of Health and Human Performance,
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA;
3Lisa Y. Lefferts Consulting, Nellysford, Virginia, USA


snip...

Table 1. Animal feed ingredients that are legally used in U.S. animal feeds

Animal


Rendered animal protein from Meat meal, meat meal tankage, meat and bone
meal, poultry meal, animal the slaughter of food by-product meal, dried
animal blood, blood meal, feather meal, egg-shell production animals and
other meal, hydrolyzed whole poultry, hydrolyzed hair, bone marrow, and
animal animals digest from dead, dying, diseased, or disabled animals
including deer and elk Animal waste Dried ruminant waste, dried swine waste,
dried poultry litter, and undried processed animal waste products


snip...


Conclusions


Food-animal production in the United States has changed markedly in the past
century, and these changes have paralleled major changes in animal feed
formulations. While this industrialized system of food-animal production may
result in increased production efficiencies, some of the changes in animal
feeding practices may result in unintended adverse health consequences for
consumers of animal-based food products. Currently, the use of animal feed
ingredients,
including rendered animal products, animal waste, antibiotics, metals, and
fats, could result in higher levels of bacteria, antibioticresistant
bacteria, prions, arsenic, and dioxinlike compounds in animals and resulting
animal-based food products intended for human consumption. Subsequent human
health effects among consumers could include increases in bacterial
infections (antibioticresistant and nonresistant) and increases in the risk
of developing chronic (often fatal) diseases
such as vCJD. Nevertheless, in spite of the wide range of potential human
health impacts that could result from animal feeding practices, there are
little data collected at the federal or state level concerning the amounts
of specific ingredients that are intentionally included in U.S. animal feed.
In addition, almost no biological or chemical testing is conducted on
complete U.S. animal feeds; insufficient testing is performed on retail meat
products; and human health effects data are not appropriately linked to this
information. These surveillance inadequacies make it difficult to conduct
rigorous epidemiologic studies and risk assessments
that could identify the extent to which specific human health risks are
ultimately associated with animal feeding practices. For example, as noted
above, there are insufficient data to determine whether other human
foodborne bacterial illnesses besides those caused by S. enterica serotype
Agona are associated with animal feeding practices. Likewise, there are
insufficient data to determine the percentage of antibiotic-resistant human
bacterial infections that are attributed to the nontherapeutic use of
antibiotics in animal feed. Moreover, little research has been conducted to
determine whether the use of organoarsenicals in animal feed, which can lead
to elevated levels of arsenic in meat products (Lasky et al. 2004),
contributes to increases in cancer risk. In order to address these research
gaps, the following principal actions are necessary within the United
States: a) implementation of a nationwide reporting system of the specific
amounts and types of feed ingredients of concern to public health that are
incorporated into animal feed, including antibiotics, arsenicals, rendered
animal products, fats, and animal waste; b) funding and development of
robust surveillance systems that monitor biological, chemical, and other
etiologic agents throughout the animal-based food-production chain “from
farm to fork” to human health outcomes; and c) increased communication and
collaboration among feed professionals, food-animal producers, and
veterinary and public health officials.


REFERENCES...snip...end


Sapkota et al.
668 VOLUME 115 | NUMBER 5 | May 2007 • Environmental Health Perspectives


http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1867957&blobtype=pdf

BANNED MAD COW PROTEIN IN COMMERCE

10,000,000+ LBS. of PROHIBITED BANNED MAD COW FEED I.E. MBM IN COMMERCE USA
2007

Date: March 21, 2007 at 2:27 pm PST
RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: VETERINARY MEDICINES -- CLASS II
___________________________________
PRODUCT
Bulk cattle feed made with recalled Darling’s 85% Blood Meal, Flash Dried,
Recall # V-024-2007
CODE
Cattle feed delivered between 01/12/2007 and 01/26/2007
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Pfeiffer, Arno, Inc, Greenbush, WI. by conversation on February 5, 2007.
Firm initiated recall is ongoing.
REASON
Blood meal used to make cattle feed was recalled because it was
cross-contaminated with prohibited bovine meat and bone meal that had been
manufactured on common equipment and labeling did not bear cautionary BSE
statement.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
42,090 lbs.
DISTRIBUTION
WI

___________________________________
PRODUCT
Custom dairy premix products: MNM ALL PURPOSE Pellet, HILLSIDE/CDL
Prot-Buffer Meal, LEE, M.-CLOSE UP PX Pellet, HIGH DESERT/ GHC LACT Meal,
TATARKA, M CUST PROT Meal, SUNRIDGE/CDL PROTEIN Blend, LOURENZO, K PVM DAIRY
Meal, DOUBLE B DAIRY/GHC LAC Mineral, WEST PIONT/GHC CLOSEUP Mineral, WEST
POINT/GHC LACT Meal, JENKS, J/COMPASS PROTEIN Meal, COPPINI – 8# SPECIAL
DAIRY Mix, GULICK, L-LACT Meal (Bulk), TRIPLE J – PROTEIN/LACTATION, ROCK
CREEK/GHC MILK Mineral, BETTENCOURT/GHC S.SIDE MK-MN, BETTENCOURT #1/GHC
MILK MINR, V&C DAIRY/GHC LACT Meal, VEENSTRA, F/GHC LACT Meal, SMUTNY,
A-BYPASS ML W/SMARTA, Recall # V-025-2007
CODE
The firm does not utilize a code - only shipping documentation with
commodity and weights identified.
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Rangen, Inc, Buhl, ID, by letters on February 13 and 14, 2007. Firm
initiated recall is complete.
REASON
Products manufactured from bulk feed containing blood meal that was cross
contaminated with prohibited meat and bone meal and the labeling did not
bear cautionary BSE statement.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
9,997,976 lbs.
DISTRIBUTION
ID and NV

END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR MARCH 21, 2007


http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF00996.html

Subject: Calf Claimer Powder with prohibited bovine blood meal which did not
bear the cautionary BSE statement DISTRIBUTION NATIONWIDE
Date: June 13, 2007 at 10:59 am PST

RECALLS AND FIELD CORRECTIONS: VETERINARY MEDICINE - CLASS II
___________________________________
PRODUCT
O-NO-MORE (Formerly ORPHAN-NO-MORE) Calf Claimer Powder, packaged in 11-oz.
bottles, For Animal Use Only. Recall # V-043-2007
CODE
A06
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Springer Magrath Co., Mc Cook, NE, by telephone on January 2, 2007, fax
dated January 9, 2007, by letters on February 22, 2007, March 12, March 14
and March 21, 2007. Firm initiated recall is ongoing.

REASON
The finished product was manufactured with prohibited bovine blood meal and
did not bear the cautionary BSE statement that the product should not be fed
to ruminants.

VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
Approximately 13,255 bottles

DISTRIBUTION

Nationwide


END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR JUNE 13, 2007
###

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF01008.html


PLEASE note ;


REASON

The finished product was manufactured with prohibited bovine blood meal and

did not bear the cautionary BSE statement that the product should not be fed

to ruminants


http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF01008.html


i went and looked at warning letters a few months ago that read ;


REASON

Blood meal used to make cattle feed was recalled because it was
cross-contaminated with

prohibited bovine meat and bone meal that had been manufactured on common
equipment and

labeling did not bear cautionary BSE statement.

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF00996.html

WE do know that it is perfectly legal to feed blood to livestock for
consumption.


Table 1. Animal feed ingredients that are legally used in U.S. animal feeds


Animal


Rendered animal protein from Meat meal, meat meal tankage, meat and bone

meal, poultry meal, animal the slaughter of food by-product meal, dried
animal blood, blood meal, feather meal, egg-shell production animals and
other meal, hydrolyzed whole poultry, hydrolyzed hair, bone marrow, and
animal animals digest from dead, dying, diseased, or disabled animals
including deer and elk Animal waste Dried ruminant waste, dried swine waste,
dried poultry litter, and undried processed animal waste products

snip...end


Sapkota et al.
668 VOLUME 115 | NUMBER 5 | May 2007 • Environmental Health Perspectives


http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=1867957&blobtype=pdf


a few more mad cow feed ban violations over the past year or so (1,000s of TONs) IN COMMERCE

http://ranchers.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19155

TSS




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