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From: TSS ()
Subject: Health fears grow as mountains of meat are smuggled into the UK (flying biological suitcase bombs)
Date: June 9, 2007 at 8:09 pm PST

Health fears grow as mountains of meat are smuggled into the UK


Jamie Doward, home affairs editor
Sunday June 10, 2007
The Observer


The amount of illegal meat entering Britain may be far higher than previously thought, increasing concerns about contamination of the food chain.
New figures disclosed by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) show the amount seized by customs and local authority environmental health teams has risen by almost 600 per cent in the last six years. Defra minister Ben Bradshaw said 104 tons of illegal meat was seized last year, compared with 18.6 tons in 2001.


Previously the government's Veterinary Laboratories Agency had estimated that an average 12,000 tons of meat enters Britain illegally each year, carried in by passengers travelling through ferry terminals and airports, via mail and hidden in containers on sea tankers. But the sixfold rise in seizures suggests the true figure could be dramatically higher.
Defra has increased funding to tackle the problem, amid concerns that infected produce could enter the food chain. The move was prompted by concerns that the foot-and-mouth outbreak of 2001, which cost the taxpayer £8bn, was a result of contaminated meat imported in pigswill. At Heathrow airport alone there are now four teams of customs officials dedicated to detecting illegal meat.

The illegal meat trade in Britain takes many forms. Much of it is smuggled in from Eastern Europe and China. Some of it is in the form of 'smokies', the blowtorched carcasses of sheep or goats which are a West African delicacy. Around 2 per cent of the illegal imports is bushmeat - exotic meat such as zebra, ant-eater or monkey - which is highly prized among Afro-Caribbean communities.

A spokeswoman for Revenue and Customs said around half of all meat seizures made by its officials were from passengers smuggling food into Britain in suitcases. Often the meat is hidden in pillows or under clothing. One popular ploy is to stuff large bamboo shoots with meat and seal them at both ends with mud. She said: 'Some of the smuggling is just down to ignorance. For example, people bringing in beef jerky from America. It's illegal but many people don't know it. But it's often down to economics. A T-bone steak can cost anything between £40 and £50 in Britain but in West Africa it will cost just £3.'

Concerns have increased amid revelations the European Union is considering allowing the remains of animals to be used as farm feed for the first time since the BSE crisis.

The Observer has learnt from one senior trading standards officer that poultry smuggled in from Egypt, where avian flu was confirmed last year, is on sale at markets across London. Dr Yunes Teinaz, acting environmental health manager for the London borough of Hackney, said much of the trade was carried out by criminal gangs: 'It's a very big black-market industry with highly lucrative rewards. You just need £400 to buy an old van and you can go around the country distributing illegal meat.'

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2099731,00.html

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2099731,00.html


Subject: Docket No: 02-088-1 RE-Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of
2002;
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 2003 15:54:57 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: [log in to unmask]
Docket No: 02-088-1

Title: Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002;
Possession, Use, and Transfer of Biological Agents and Toxins

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=fr13de02-15.pdf

Greetings,

i would like to kindly submit to this docket and warn of
the potential for biological 'suitcase bombs' from
civilian air-traffic populations from known BSE/FMD
and other exotic animal disease pathogens coming into
the USA.

please be warned;

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2002 08:42:56 -0800
Reply-To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Sender: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
Subject: USA SEALED BORDERS AND THE ''USCS'' (unspecified species coding
system) MORE POTENTIAL B.S.eee

Change in Disease Status of Greece With Regard to Foot-and-Mouth

[Federal Register: March 21, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 55)]

snip...

Under Sec. 94.11, meat and other animal products of ruminants and swine,
including ship stores, airplane meals, and baggage containing these meat
or animal products, may not be imported into the United States except in
accordance with Sec. 94.11 and the applicable requirements of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service at 9 CFR
chapter III.

snip...

From an economic standpoint, the proposed rule would have little or no
impact on U.S. animal stock and commodities. There are two reasons.
First, the proposed rule would not remove other disease-based
restrictions on the importation of ruminants or swine (and certain meat
and other products from those animals) from Greece into the United
States. Because bovine spongiform encephalopathy is considered to exist
in Greece, the importation of ruminants and meat, meat products, and
certain other products of ruminants that have been in Greece is prohibited.

snip...

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-6837-filed

========================

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from
the country?

Very few products that would be of risk for transmission of BSE were
imported into the US from Greece during 2000 or 2001 (January - April).
Due to the above mentioned import ban, no live ruminants, ruminant meat,
meal made from ruminants, or other high risk products from ruminants
were imported from Greece during this time period. In 2001 (January -
April), 3000 kg of enzymes and prepared enzymes and 5 kg of medicants
containing antibiotics for veterinary use were imported. The data do not
provide a species of origin code for these products, therefore they may
not contain any ruminant product.

Sources: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from the affected country?

Approximately 185,000 direct flights from Greece arrived to US airports
in fiscal year 2000. Also, an unknown number of passengers from Greece
arrived via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQ's agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 584 air
passengers from Greece were sampled for items of agricultural interest
in fiscal year 2000. Of these passengers, 14 carried meat (non-pork)
items that could potentially transmit pathogens that cause BSE; most
passengers carried from one to two kilograms (kg) of meat, although one
passenger in November 1999 carried 23 kg of meat in a suitcase. Florida,
Massachusetts, and New York were the reported destinations of these
passengers. None of the passengers with meat items reported plans to
visit or work on a ranch or farm while in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_greece0701.htm

Greetings list members,

i just cannot accept this;

> 23 kg of meat in a suitcase (suitcase bomb...TSS)

> The data do not provide a species of origin code for these

> products, therefore they may not contain any ruminant product.

what kind of statement is this?

how stupid do they think we are?

it could also very well mean that _all_ of it was ruminant based products !

Terry S. Singeltary Sr., Bacliff, Texas USA

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from Slovenia?

There were no direct flights from Slovenia to the US in fiscal year 2000.

APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring sampled 27 air
passengers from Slovenia for items of agricultural interest in fiscal
year 2000. One of these 27 passengers was carrying two kilograms of a
meat item that could potentially harbor pathogens that cause BSE. This
passenger arrived to Elizabeth, New York, in June 2000 and declared no
intention to visit a farm or ranch in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_slovenia1101.htm

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from the affected country?

A total of 45,438 passengers arrived in the US on direct flights from
the Czech Republic in fiscal year 2000. It is likely that additional
passengers originating in the Czech Republic traveled to the US on
non-direct flights.

As part of APHIS-PPQ’s Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring, 238
air passengers from the Czech Republic were inspected for items of
agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. Of these, 10, or 4.2%, were
found to be carrying a total of 17 kg of items that could potentially
present a risk for BSE. None of the passengers with items reported plans
to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_cz0601.htm

What are the US imports of affected animals or animal products from Austria?

Between 1998 and June 2001, US imports from Austria included goat meat,
animal feeds, and sausage. The sausage and animals feeds were from
unspecified species.

Source: World Trade Atlas

snip...

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from Austria?

A total of 168,598 passengers on direct flights from Austria arrived at
US airports in fiscal year 2000. An undetermined number of passengers
from Austria arrived in the US via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQ’s agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 565 air
passengers from Austria were sampled for items of agricultural interest
in fiscal year 2000. Ten (10) of these passengers, or 1.7 percent,
carried a total of 23 kg meat (non-pork) items that could potentially
harbor the pathogen(s) that cause BSE. None of these passengers from
whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a
ranch or farm during their visit to the US.

Source: US Dept. of Transportation; APHIS-PPQ

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_austria1201.htm

Greetings FDA and public,

if you go to the below site, and search all BSE known countries and
check out their air traffic illegal meat they have confiscated, and
check out the low number checked, compared to actual passenger traffic,
would not take too much for some nut to bring in FMD/TSEs into the USA
as a 'suitcase bomb'.

[[Under APHIS-PPQ's agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 284
air passengers from Israel were sampled for items of agricultural
interest in fiscal year 2001. Seven of these passengers, or 2 percent,
carried a total of 11 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the
pathogen that causes BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items
were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm
during their visit to the U.S.]]

if they were to have questioned the terrorist that bombed the Twin
Towers with jets, if they were to have questioned them at flight school
in the USA, i am sure that they would have said they did not intend to
visit the Twin Towers as a flying bomb either. what am i thinking, they
probably did ask this? stupid me.

[[In 1999 a small amount of non-species specific meat and offal was
imported and a small amount of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was also
imported. FBS is considered to have a relatively low risk of
transmitting BSE.]]

more of the USA infamous 'non-species coding system', wonder how many of
these species are capable of carrying a TSE?

snip...

A total of 524,401 passengers arrived on direct flights to the U.S. from
Israel in fiscal year 2000. This number does not include passengers who
arrived in the U.S. from Israel via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQ's agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 284 air
passengers from Israel were sampled for items of agricultural interest
in fiscal year 2001. Seven of these passengers, or 2 percent, carried a
total of 11 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the pathogen
that causes BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items were
confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during
their visit to the U.S.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_israel0602.htm

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base.

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from Japan?

Approximately 6.84 million passengers on 29,826 direct flights from
Japan arrived at US airports in fiscal year 2000. An undetermined number
of passengers from Japan arrived in the US via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQ's agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring, 801 air
passengers from Japan were sampled for items of agricultural interest in
fiscal year 2000. Of these 801 passengers, 10 carried meat (non-pork)
items that could potentially harbor the pathogen(s) that cause BSE; most
passengers carried an average of 1.7 kilograms of meat. None of these
passengers from whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit
or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_japan0901.htm

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States
from the affected country?

A total of 3.3 million passengers arrived in the US on direct flights
from Germany in 1998, although many of these passengers would not have
originated in Germany. As part of APHIS-PPQ's Agriculture Quarantine
Inspection Monitoring, 8,247 air passengers from Germany were inspected
for items of agricultural interest. Of these, 198, or 2.3%, were found
to be carrying a total of 304 kg of items that could potentially present
a risk for BSE. Thirty (30) of the passengers with items reported plans
to visit or work on a farm or ranch while in the US. Reported
destination states of these 30 passengers were CA, CO, DE, FL, LA, MT,
OH, VA, and WY.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_germany1200e.htm

search archives at bottom of page of each BSE Country;

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/iw_archive.htm

more on non-species coding system and TSEs and potential
'suitcase bombs';

To: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy
Subject: Re: POLAND FINDS 4TH MAD COW CASE/USA IMPORTS FROM
POLAND/non-species coding system strikes again
References: <[log in to unmask]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
X-Virus-Scanner: Found to be clean

Greetings again List Members,

let me kick a madcow around here a bit.

on the imports from Poland and the infamous USA
'non-species' coding system.

the USDA/APHIS states;

> During the past four years (1998 - 2001), US imports from
> Poland included non-species specific animal products
> used in animal feeds and non-species specific sausage and offal
> products (Table 3). Given US restrictions on ruminant product
> imports, these US imports should not have contained ruminant
> material.

NOW, if you read Polands GBR risk assessment and opinion
on BSE, especially _cross-contamination_, it states;

ANNEX 1

Poland - Summary of the GBR-Assessment, February 2001

EXTERNAL CHALLENGE STABILITY INTERACTION OF EXTERNAL
CHALLENGE AND STABILITY


The very high to extremely high external
challenge met a very unstable system and
could have led to contamination of
domestic cattle in Poland from 1987
onwards.

This internal challenge again met the still
very unstable system and increased over
time.

The continuing very high external
challenge supported this development.

Not OK
MBM-ban
since 1997,
but no feed
controls.
Reasonably OK
Heat treatment
equivalent to
133°C / 20min / 3
bar standards, but
no evidence
provided on
compliance.

Not OK.
No SRM-ban,
SRM are
rendered and
included in
cattle feed.

BSE surveillance:

Not sufficient before
2001.

Cross-contamination:

Lines for ruminant
and non-ruminant
feed in feed-mills only
separated in time and
no analytical controls
carried out.
Likely present since 1987 and growing.

see full text and ANNEX 1 at;

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

so in my humble opinion, the statement by the USDA/APHIS
that ''these US imports _should_ not have contained ruminant
materials, is a joke. a sad joke indeed.

* POLAND BSE GBR RISK ASSESSMENT

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

BSE ISRAEL change in disease status, AND THE DAMN NON-SPECIES CODING
SYSTEM $$$

Subject: BSE ISRAEL change in disease status, AND THE DAMN NON-SPECIES
CODING SYSTEM $$$
Date: November 1, 2002 at 8:03 am PST

[Federal Register: November 1, 2002 (Volume 67, Number 212)]

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

9 CFR Part 94

[Docket No. 02-072-2]


Change in Disease Status of Israel Because of BSE

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Affirmation of interim rule as final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim
rule that amended the regulations by adding Israel to the list of
regions where bovine spongiform encephalopathy exists because the
disease had been detected in a native-born animal in that region. The
effect of the interim rule was a restriction on the importation of
ruminants, meat, meat products, and certain other products of ruminants
that had been in Israel. The interim rule was necessary to help prevent
the introduction of bovine spongiform encephalopathy into the United
States.

EFFECTIVE DATE: The interim rule became effective on June 4, 2002.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Gary Colgrove, Chief Staff
Veterinarian, Sanitary Trade Issues Team, National Center for Import
and Export, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737-
1231; (301) 734-4356.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

The regulations in 9 CFR parts 93, 94, 95, and 96 (referred to
below as the regulations) govern the importation of certain animals,
birds, poultry, meat, other animal products and byproducts, hay, and
straw into the United States in order to prevent the introduction of
various animal diseases, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy
(BSE).
In an interim rule effective June 4, 2002, and published in the
Federal Register on July 18, 2002 (67 FR 47243-47244, Docket No. 02-
072-1), we amended the regulations in Sec. 94.18 (a)(1) by adding
Israel to the list of regions where BSE exists due to the detection of
BSE in a native-born animal in that region.
Comments on the interim rule were required to be received on or
before September 16, 2002. We did not receive any comments. Therefore,
for the reasons given in the interim rule, we are adopting the interim
rule as a final rule.
This action also affirms the information contained in the interim
rule concerning Executive Orders 12866 and 12988 and the Paperwork
Reduction Act.
Further, for this action, the Office of Management and Budget has
waived its review under Executive Order 12866.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

This action affirms an interim rule that amended the regulations by
adding Israel to the list of regions where BSE exists. The effect of
the interim rule was a restriction on the importation of ruminants,
meat, meat products, and certain other products of ruminants that had
been in Israel. The interim rule was necessary to help prevent the
introduction of BSE into the United States.
The following analysis addresses the economic effects of the
interim rule on small entities, as required by the Regulatory
Flexibility Act.
The interim rule's restrictions on the importation of ruminants and
ruminant products and byproducts from Israel are not expected to have a
significant impact on a substantial number of small entities due to the
fact that the restricted items are either not imported from Israel or
are imported in very small amounts. There are three categories of
imports that may be affected, but Israel's share of U.S. imports is
small in each case.
The first category of affected imported commodities is ``Meat and
edible meat offal, salted in brine, dried or smoked; edible flours and
meals of meat or meat offal.'' Average total yearly imports of these
products by the United States over the 3-year period 1999-2001 were
valued at $24.6 million. Imports from Israel in 1999 were valued at
$26,000. No imports of these products from Israel were reported for
2000 or 2001.
The second category of affected commodities is ``Preparations of a
kind used in animal feeding.'' Average total yearly imports of these
products, 1999-2001, were valued at $93.5 million. Imports from Israel
had an average yearly value over this period of about $76,000.
The final category of affected commodities is ``Other prepared or
preserved meat, meat offal or blood.'' Average yearly imports of these
products, 1999-2001, were valued at $101.2 million. Imports from Israel
had an average yearly value over this period of about $2.7 million.
It is apparent that Israel is a minor supplier to the United States
of the ruminant products and byproducts affected by the BSE-related
restrictions resulting from the interim rule. Therefore, we do not
expect that the interim rule's restrictions on ruminants and ruminant
products and byproducts from Israel will substantially affect any U.S.
importers, large or small, of those commodities.
Under these circumstances, the Administrator of the Animal and
Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that this action will
not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small
entities.

List of Subjects in 9 CFR Part 94

Animal diseases, Imports, Livestock, Meat and meat products, Milk,
Poultry and poultry products, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

PART 94--RINDERPEST, FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE, FOWL PEST (FOWL
PLAGUE), EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE, AFRICAN SWINE FEVER, HOG
CHOLERA, AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY: PROHIBITED AND
RESTRICTED IMPORTATIONS

Accordingly, we are adopting as a final rule, without change, the
interim rule that amended 9 CFR part 94 and that was published at 67 FR
47243-47244 on July 18, 2002.

Authority: 7 U.S.C. 450, 7711-7714, 7751, 7754, 8303, 8306,
8308, 8310, 8311, and 8315; 21 U.S.C 136 and 136a; 31 U.S.C. 9701;
42 U.S.C. 4331 and 4332; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.4.

Done in Washington, DC, this 28th day of October, 2002.
Bobby R. Acord,
Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
[FR Doc. 02-27812 Filed 10-31-02; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-34-P

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-27812-filed

greetings List members,

MORE OF THE INFAMOUS USA NON-SPECIES CODING SYSTEM.

as long as the exporting country and the importing country
know not what they are exporting (play dumb/stupid), this
non-species coding system allows potential BSE/TSE materials
to be imported and exported freely and legally...

TSS

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from Israel
?

The U.S. imported no live ruminants or ruminant meat from Israel since 1999.
In 1999 a small amount of non-species specific meat and offal was imported
and a small amount of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was also imported. FBS is
considered to have a relatively low risk of transmitting BSE. Other imports
from Israel during the period 1998-2001 included non-species specific
preparations used in animal feeds and other non-food products of unspecified
animals. For the category "preparations used in animal feeding, NESOI" that
was imported into the U.S., it is possible that bovine meat or bovine
byproducts could have been included in this category. However, the US Food
and Drug Administration prohibits feeding of meat-and-bone meal to ruminants
in the U.S.

HS Code

Description

Unit

1998

1999

2000

2001

Feed - non species specific

Total

45,030

48,000

50,649

43,000

2309909500

Preparations Used in Animal Feedings, NESOI

KG

45,030

48,000

50,649

43,000

Meat & offal- non species specific

Total

5

0

0

0

300110

Dried Organs

KG

5

0

0

0

Other animal products - ruminants

Total

24

0

0

0

3002100040

Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS)

KG

24

0

0

0

Source: World Trade Atlas

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from
Israel?

A total of 524,401 passengers arrived on direct flights to the U.S. from
Israel in fiscal year 2000. This number does not include passengers who
arrived in the U.S. from Israel via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQ?s agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 284 air
passengers from Israel were sampled for items of agricultural interest in
fiscal year 2001. Seven of these passengers, or 2 percent, carried a total
of 11 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the pathogen that
causes BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items were confiscated
reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the
U.S.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural
Quarantine Inspection data base.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/bse_israel0602.htm

TSS


Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
P.O. Box 42
Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

Docket Management
Docket: 02N-0276 - Bioterrorism Preparedness; Registration of Food
Facilities, Section 305
Comment Number: EC -254
Accepted - Volume 11


http://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/DOCKETS/02n0276/02N-0276-EC-254.htm


TSS




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