SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS ()
Subject: MAD CALF POWDER PACKAGED 9-OZ BOTTLES RECALL finished product BBM cross-contaminated with prohibited bovine MBM
Date: January 31, 2007 at 10:00 am PST

PRODUCT
O-NO-MORE (Formerly ORPHAN-NO-MORE) Calf Claimer Powder, packaged in 9-oz. bottles, For Animal Use Only, Recall # V-011-2007
CODE
A07
RECALLING FIRM/MANUFACTURER
Springer Magrath Co., McCook, NB, by telephone on January 11, 2007 and fax on January 12, 2007. Firm initiated recall is complete.
REASON
The bovine blood meal which was used to manufacture the finished product was cross-contaminated with prohibited bovine meat and bone meal, and the finished product is not labeled with the cautionary statement that it should not be fed to ruminants.
VOLUME OF PRODUCT IN COMMERCE
300/9-oz. bottles
DISTRIBUTION
NE
END OF ENFORCEMENT REPORT FOR JANUARY 31, 2007

###

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/enforce/2007/ENF00989.html

seems to me the BBM i.e. bovine blood meal would be more of a risk factor for bovine TSE i.e. BASE OR BSE or any other strain, than the MBM i.e. meat and bone meal. considering the recent 4th documented case of transfusion related vCJD, i still think it is absolutely asinine to continue to use bovine blood in feed for any species. i wonder if it's still being used in pet foods??? course, we don't have mad cats FSE here in the USA either ;-)

INEDIBLE RAW BLOOD, BLOOD MEAL, ADHESIVE FOR LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY FEED, PETFOOD, FERTILIZER, GLUES, FOAM FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/05/29008001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s168.pdf

Legislative changes and developments in the process post-BSE


Voluntary measures adopted by pet food manufacturers


8.45 In July 1988, Spillers stopped using bovine spleen in its products and replaced it with liver. At the same time, it changed its specification for ground bone to exclude the use of bovine heads and backbones with the intention of eliminating brains and spinal cord.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s168.pdf

8.47 In February 1989, the report of the Southwood Working Party stated that domestic pets could be susceptible to BSE, if the agent were to reach them 'in an adequate dose by an appropriate route'. However, the report also suggested that pets such as cats and dogs might not be able to acquire the infection orally and that the high temperatures used in the canning process might have destroyed any infectious agent present.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ib/ibd1/tab02.pdf

8.48 By March 1989, it was reported that most companies manufacturing pet food were 'avoiding UK cattle nerve tissue, spleen and brains' in favour of sheep or poultry meat.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume13/chaptef3.htm#243064

18 January 2007 - Draft minutes of the SEAC 95 meeting (426 KB) held on 7
December 2006 are now available.

snip...

ITEM 9 - ANY OTHER BUSINESS

snip...


64. A member noted that at the recent Neuroprion meeting, a study was
presented showing that in transgenic mice BSE passaged in sheep may be more
virulent and infectious to a wider range of species than bovine derived BSE. ...

http://www.seac.gov.uk/minutes/95.pdf


Instead of UK bovine material, it used poultry and porcine material or imported bovine material from outside the UK. Manufacturers had obtained materials from the US, Canada and Australasia,

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/ws/s168.pdf

Other work presented suggested that BSE and bovine amyloidotic spongiform
encephalopathy (BASE) MAY BE RELATED. A mutation had been identified in the
prion protein gene in an AMERICAN BASE CASE THAT WAS SIMILAR IN NATURE TO A
MUTATION FOUND IN CASES OF SPORADIC CJD.

snip...

http://www.seac.gov.uk/minutes/95.pdf


3:30 Transmission of the Italian Atypical BSE (BASE) in Humanized Mouse

Models Qingzhong Kong, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pathology, Case Western Reserve
University

Bovine Amyloid Spongiform Encephalopathy (BASE) is an atypical BSE strain
discovered recently in Italy, and similar or different atypical BSE cases
were also reported in other countries. The infectivity and phenotypes of
these atypical BSE strains in humans are unknown. In collaboration with
Pierluigi Gambetti, as well as Maria Caramelli and her co-workers, we have
inoculated transgenic mice expressing human prion protein with brain
homogenates from BASE or BSE infected cattle. Our data shows that about half
of the BASE-inoculated mice became infected with an average incubation time
of about 19 months; in contrast, none of the BSE-inoculated mice appear to
be infected after more than 2 years.

***These results indicate that BASE is transmissible to humans and suggest that BASE is more virulent than
classical BSE in humans.***


6:30 Close of Day One


http://www.healthtech.com/2007/tse/day1.asp

3.2.6 The Possibility That BSE-Infected Cattle Carry Infectivity in Their Blood

The base case assumes that cattle infected with BSE do not carry infectivity in their blood

(although emboli formation may result in blood contamination). We consider the possibility that

0.016% of the infectivity in an animal with BSE is carried in the blood, a value that is consistent

with the assumption that its concentration is at the level of detection in an animal with a fullblown

case of BSE (SSC, 2000a).

snip...

3.3.3 Domestic Scrapie

The transmission of scrapie from sheep to cattle is one of the primary hypotheses for the

origin of BSE (Horn et al., 2001). Moreover, scrapie is present in the United States. Although

no North American strain of scrapie has been successfully transmitted to cattle exposed orally to

the agent (Cutlip et al., 2001), we evaluate the impact of assuming that such transmission is

possible. In particular, if such transmission is possible, we estimate that the rendering of scrapieinfected

sheep could expose the U.S. cattle population to 1 cattle oral ID50 in feed each month.

The derivation of this estimate is based on the assumption that the number of cattle oral ID50s

administered to cattle is equal to the product of 1) the number of scrapie-infected sheep rendered

each year, 2) the number of sheep oral ID50s per infected animal, 3) the inverse of the cattle-sheep

species barrier, and 4) the proportion of infectivity sent to rendering that survives rendering and is

ultimately administered to cattle.


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/risk_assessment/mainreporttext.pdf


Subject: [CJD-L] BSE? * Scrapie * CJD * TEXAS -- question please

Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 16:28:52 -0600

From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."

Reply-To: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

To: CJD-L@uni-karlsruhe.de

############ Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

#############

Greetings list members, I have tried to send this message to the experts

on the BSE-List, but it seems to be down. So I thought I would just pass

it through this list, as to most of the experts on this list as well.

Thank You,

I would like to ask this question please;

What would the risk of B.S.E. be, if any, if the following risk factors

were to have occurred?

Lets say in the state of Texas, where there have been several

undocumented clusters of CJD, and one documented cluster of CJD victims.

Lets say that this state is in a category of the 'highest' risk of

B.S.E., due to the risk categories based on Scrapie reported and the

ratio of Dairy Concentrates Fed to Sheep MBM Produced.

*The ratio is inversely related to potential risk,

i.e. (F.) is highest risk

**Meat and bone meal from sheep > 1 year.

Texas Risk category -- [1.] Highest

Risk Level [1.] Analysis = Scrapie is reported in the same or adjacent

counties as milk cows having a ratio less than 999.

Texas

Number of Ewes - (A.) 1,321,967

Number of Flocks - (B.) 6,714

'Scrapie' infected Flocks - (C.) 10

Incidence per 100 Flocks - (D.) 0.15

Incidence per 10K Ewes - (E.) 0.08

Number of Cows with Ratio*

20-99 (F.) 4,153

100-999 (G.) 2,572

1,000-9,999 (H.) 36,972

Milk Cow Inventory

(I.) 356,538

F+G+H/I Percent

(J.) 12.3

Thank You,

Terry S. Singeltary Sr., Bacliff, Texas USA

############ http://mailhost.rz.uni-karlsruhe.de/warc/cjd-l.html

############

TEJAS MAD COW, THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Statement
May 4, 2004
Media Inquiries: 301-827-6242
Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA


Statement on Texas Cow With Central Nervous System Symptoms
On Friday, April 30 th , the Food and Drug Administration learned that a cow with central nervous system symptoms had been killed and shipped to a processor for rendering into animal protein for use in animal feed.

FDA, which is responsible for the safety of animal feed, immediately began an investigation. On Friday and throughout the weekend, FDA investigators inspected the slaughterhouse, the rendering facility, the farm where the animal came from, and the processor that initially received the cow from the slaughterhouse.

FDA's investigation showed that the animal in question had already been rendered into "meat and bone meal" (a type of protein animal feed). Over the weekend FDA was able to track down all the implicated material. That material is being held by the firm, which is cooperating fully with FDA.

Cattle with central nervous system symptoms are of particular interest because cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy or BSE, also known as "mad cow disease," can exhibit such symptoms. In this case, there is no way now to test for BSE. But even if the cow had BSE, FDA's animal feed rule would prohibit the feeding of its rendered protein to other ruminant animals (e.g., cows, goats, sheep, bison).

FDA is sending a letter to the firm summarizing its findings and informing the firm that FDA will not object to use of this material in swine feed only. If it is not used in swine feed, this material will be destroyed. Pigs have been shown not to be susceptible to BSE. If the firm agrees to use the material for swine feed only, FDA will track the material all the way through the supply chain from the processor to the farm to ensure that the feed is properly monitored and used only as feed for pigs.

To protect the U.S. against BSE, FDA works to keep certain mammalian protein out of animal feed for cattle and other ruminant animals. FDA established its animal feed rule in 1997 after the BSE epidemic in the U.K. showed that the disease spreads by feeding infected ruminant protein to cattle.

Under the current regulation, the material from this Texas cow is not allowed in feed for cattle or other ruminant animals. FDA's action specifying that the material go only into swine feed means also that it will not be fed to poultry.

FDA is committed to protecting the U.S. from BSE and collaborates closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on all BSE issues. The animal feed rule provides crucial protection against the spread of BSE, but it is only one of several such firewalls. FDA will soon be improving the animal feed rule, to make this strong system even stronger.

####

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/NEW01061.html

TSS REPORT ON 2ND TEJAS MAD COW Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:12:15 -0600 (the one
that did NOT get away, thanks to the Honorable Phyllis Fong)

Aug 30, 2005 USDA Texas BSE Investigation—Final Epidemiology Report
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/bse/downloads/bse_final_epi_report8-05.pdf

TSS REPORT ON 2ND TEJAS MAD COW Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:12:15 -0600 (the one
that did NOT get away, thanks to the Honorable Phyllis Fong)


-------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: BSE 'INCONCLUSIVE' COW from
TEXAS ???
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:12:15 -0600
From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
To: Carla Everett
References: <[log in to unmask]>
<[log in to unmask] us>


Greetings Carla,still hear a rumor;

Texas single beef cow not born in Canada no beef entered the food chain?

and i see the TEXAS department of animal health is ramping up forsomething,
but they forgot a url for update?I HAVE NO ACTUAL CONFIRMATION YET...can you
confirm???terry

==============================
==============================


-------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: BSE 'INCONCLUSIVE' COW from
TEXAS ???
Date: Fri, 19 Nov 2004 11:38:21 -0600
From: Carla Everett
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
References: <[log in to unmask]>


The USDA has made a statement, and we are referring all callers to the USDA
web site. We have no informationabout the animal being in Texas. CarlaAt
09:44 AM 11/19/2004, you wrote:>Greetings Carla,>>i am getting
unsubstantiated claims of this BSE 'inconclusive' cow is from>TEXAS. can you
comment on this either way please?>>thank you,>Terry S. Singeltary Sr.>>
===================
===================


-------- Original Message -------- Subject: Re: BSE 'INCONCLUSIVE' COW from
TEXAS ???
Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:33:20 -0600
From: Carla Everett
To: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr."
References: <[log in to unmask]>
<[log in to unmask] us>
<[log in to unmask]> <[log in to unmask]
us> <[log in to unmask]>


our computer department was working on a place holder we could postUSDA's
announcement of any results. There are no results to be announced tonightby
NVSL, so we are back in a waiting mode and will post the USDA
announcementwhen we hear something.At 06:05 PM 11/22/2004, you wrote:>why
was the announcement on your TAHC site removed?>>Bovine Spongiform
Encephalopathy:>November 22: Press Release title here >>star image More BSE
information>>>>terry>>Carla Everett wrote:>>>no confirmation on the U.S.'
inconclusive test...>>no confirmation on location of
animal.>>>>>>==========================
==========================

THEN, 7+ MONTHS OF COVER-UP BY JOHANN ET AL! no doubt about it now $$$


NO, it's not pretty, hell, im not pretty, but these are the facts, take em
or leave em, however, you cannot change them.

with kindest regards,

I am still sincerely disgusted and tired in sunny Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.


FULL 130 LASHINGS TO USDA BY OIG again
http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/50601-10-KC.pdf


Link: TSS


http://lists.ifas.ufl.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind0612&L=sanet-mg&T=0&P=23557


12/10/76
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTE ON SCRAPIE
Office Note
CHAIRMAN: PROFESSOR PETER WILDY

snip...

A The Present Position with respect to Scrapie
A] The Problem

Scrapie is a natural disease of sheep and goats. It is a slow
and inexorably progressive degenerative disorder of the nervous system
and it ia fatal. It is enzootic in the United Kingdom but not in all
countries.

The field problem has been reviewed by a MAFF working group
(ARC 35/77). It is difficult to assess the incidence in Britain for
a variety of reasons but the disease causes serious financial loss;
it is estimated that it cost Swaledale breeders alone $l.7 M during
the five years 1971-1975. A further inestimable loss arises from the
closure of certain export markets, in particular those of the United
States, to British sheep.

It is clear that scrapie in sheep is important commercially and
for that reason alone effective measures to control it should be
devised as quickly as possible.

Recently the question has again been brought up as to whether
scrapie is transmissible to man. This has followed reports that the
disease has been transmitted to primates. One particularly lurid
speculation (Gajdusek 1977) conjectures that the agents of scrapie,
kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and transmissible encephalopathy of
mink are varieties of a single "virus". The U.S. Department of
Agriculture concluded that it could "no longer justify or permit
scrapie-blood line and scrapie-exposed sheep and goats to be processed
for human or animal food at slaughter or rendering plants" (ARC 84/77)"
The problem is emphasised by the finding that some strains of scrapie
produce lesions identical to the once which characterise the human
dementias"

Whether true or not. the hypothesis that these agents might be
transmissible to man raises two considerations. First, the safety
of laboratory personnel requires prompt attention. Second, action
such as the "scorched meat" policy of USDA makes the solution of the
acrapie problem urgent if the sheep industry is not to suffer
grievously.

snip...

76/10.12/4.6

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1976/10/12004001.pdf


Subject: REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCRAPIE November 9, 2005 USAHA
Date: February 12, 2006 at 1:03 pm PST

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCRAPIE

Chair: Dr. Jim Logan, Cheyenne, WY

Vice Chair: Dr. Joe D. Ross, Sonora, TX

Dr. Deborah L. Brennan, MS; Dr. Beth Carlson, ND; Dr. John R. Clifford, DC; Dr. Thomas F. Conner, OH; Dr. Walter E. Cook, WY; Dr. Wayne E. Cunningham, CO; Dr. Jerry W. Diemer, TX; Dr. Anita J. Edmondson, CA; Dr. Dee Ellis, TX; Dr. Lisa A. Ferguson, MD; Dr. Keith R. Forbes, NY; Dr. R. David Glauer, OH; Dr. James R. Grady, CO; Dr. William L. Hartmann, MN; Dr. Carolyn Inch, CAN; Dr. Susan J. Keller, ND; Dr. Allen M. Knowles, TN; Dr. Thomas F. Linfield, MT; Dr. Michael R. Marshall, UT; Dr. Cheryl A. Miller, In; Dr. Brian V. Noland, CO; Dr. Charles Palmer, CA; Dr. Kristine R. Petrini, MN; Mr. Stan Potratz, IA; Mr. Paul E. Rodgers, CO; Dr. Joan D. Rowe, CA; Dr. Pamela L. Smith, IA; Dr. Diane L. Sutton, MD; Dr. Lynn Anne Tesar, SD; Dr. Delwin D. Wilmot, NE; Dr. Nora E. Wineland, CO; Dr. Cindy B. Wolf, MN.

The Committee met on November 9, 2005, from 8:00am until 11:55am, Hershey Lodge and Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. The meeting was called to order by Dr. Jim Logan, chair, with vice chairman Dr. Joe D. Ross attending. There were 74 people in attendance.

The Scrapie Program Update was provided by Dr. Diane Sutton, National Scrapie Program Coordinator, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS), Veterinary Services (VS). The complete text of the Status Report is included in these Proceedings.

Dr. Patricia Meinhardt, USDA-APHIS-VS-National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) gave the Update on Genotyping Labs and Discrepancies in Results. NVSL conducts investigations into discrepancies on genotype testing results associated with the Scrapie Eradication Program. It is the policy of the Program to conduct a second genotype test at a second laboratory on certain individual animals. Occasionally, there are discrepancies in those results. The NVSL conducts follow-up on these situations through additional testing on additional samples from the field and archive samples from the testing laboratories.

For the period of time from January 1, 2005, until October 15, 2005, there were 23 instances of discrepancies in results from 35 flocks. Of those 23 instances, 14 were caused by laboratory error (paperwork or sample mix-up), 3 results from field error, 5 were not completely resolved, and 1 originated from the use of a non-approved laboratory for the first test. As a result of inconsistencies, one laboratory’s certification was revoked by APHIS-VS. ......

snip.......

Infected and Source Flocks

As of September 30, 2005, there were 105 scrapie infected and source flocks. There were a total of 165** new infected and source flocks reported for FY 2005. The total infected and source flocks that have been released in FY 2005 was 128. The ratio of infected and source flocks cleaned up or placed on clean up plans vs. new infected and source flocks discovered in FY 2005 was 1.03 : 1*. In addition 622 scrapie cases were confirmed and reported by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in FY 2005, of which 130 were RSSS cases. Fifteen cases of scrapie in goats have been reported since 1990. The last goat case was reported in May 2005. Approximately 5,626 animals were indemnified comprised of 49% non-registered sheep, 45% registered sheep, 1.4% non-registered goats and 4.6% registered goats.

Regulatory Scrapie Slaughter Surveillance (RSSS)

RSSS was designed to utilize the findings of the Center for Epidemiology and Animal Health (CEAH) Scrapie: Ovine Slaughter Surveillance (SOSS) study. The results of SOSS can be found at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cahm/Sheep/sheep.htm . RSSS started April 1,

2003. It is a targeted slaughter surveillance program which is designed to identify infected flocks for clean-up. During FY 2005 collections increased by 32% overall and by 90% for black and mottled faced sheep improving overall program effectiveness and efficiency as demonstrated by the 26% decrease in percent positive black faced sheep compared to FY 2004. Samples have been collected from 62,864 sheep since April 1, 2003, of which results have been reported for 59,105 of which 209 were confirmed positive. During FY 2005, 33,137 samples were collected from 81 plants. There have been 130 NVSL confirmed positive cases (30 collected in FY 2004 and confirmed in FY 2005 and 100 collected and confirmed in FY 2005) in FY 2005. Face colors of these positives were 114 black, 14 mottled, 1 white and 1 unknown. The percent positive by face color is shown in the chart below.

Scrapie Testing

In FY 2005, 35,845 animals have been tested for scrapie: 30,192 RSSS; 4,742 regulatory field cases; 772 regulatory third eyelid biopsies; 10 third eyelid validations; and 129 necropsy validations (chart 9).

Animal ID

As of October 04, 2005, 103,580 sheep and goat premises have been assigned identification numbers in the Scrapie National Generic Database. Official eartags have been issued to 73,807 of these premises.

*This number based on an adjusted 12 month interval to accommodate the 60 day period for setting up flock plans.

http://www.usaha.org/committees/reports/2005/report-scr-2005.pdf

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Northeast Texas,

J.A. Rawlings,*1 K.A.
Hendricks1, O.M. Nuno1, D.A. Brown1, D.A. Evans2, Texas Department of
Health, 1Austin and 2Tyler, Texas


Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (CJD), a transmissible spongiform
encephalopathy, is caused by prions composed of proteinaceous material
devoid of nucleic acid. CJD occurs sporadically (generally 1
case/1,000,000 population per year) in older patients (average age of
65) and is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, accompanied by
severe muscle spasms and incoordination. Death usually occurs within 3
to 12 months (average 7 months). CJD activity in Texas, which has a
population of nearly 19 million, appeared to be typical. The statewide
death rate for 1995 and 1996 was just under 1/1,000,000. In April of
1997, the Texas Department of Health became aware of an increased number
of possible CJD cases in a 23-county area of NE Texas with a population
of just over one million. After review of medical and pathology records,
four patients were identified with definite classic CJD and three were
identified with probable CJD. Dates of death for the eight patients were
from April, 1996 through mid-July 1997. The patients were from 46
through 65 years of age; four were male and three were female. A
case-control study to identify risks for CJD in NE Texas has been initiated.

http://www.jifsan.umd.edu/tse/Rawlings.htm

what i considered a cluster of CJD victims in southeast Texas,
never got the attention of the TDH or CDC. it was just all
sporadic CJDs of no importance...tss

18 January 2007 - Draft minutes of the SEAC 95 meeting (426 KB) held on 7
December 2006 are now available.

snip...

Other work presented suggested that BSE and bovine amyloidotic spongiform
encephalopathy (BASE) MAY BE RELATED. A mutation had been identified in the
prion protein gene in an AMERICAN BASE CASE THAT WAS SIMILAR IN NATURE TO A
MUTATION FOUND IN CASES OF SPORADIC CJD.

snip...

http://www.seac.gov.uk/minutes/95.pdf


3:30 Transmission of the Italian Atypical BSE (BASE) in Humanized Mouse

Models Qingzhong Kong, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pathology, Case Western Reserve
University

Bovine Amyloid Spongiform Encephalopathy (BASE) is an atypical BSE strain
discovered recently in Italy, and similar or different atypical BSE cases
were also reported in other countries. The infectivity and phenotypes of
these atypical BSE strains in humans are unknown. In collaboration with
Pierluigi Gambetti, as well as Maria Caramelli and her co-workers, we have
inoculated transgenic mice expressing human prion protein with brain
homogenates from BASE or BSE infected cattle. Our data shows that about half
of the BASE-inoculated mice became infected with an average incubation time
of about 19 months; in contrast, none of the BSE-inoculated mice appear to
be infected after more than 2 years.

***These results indicate that BASE is transmissible to humans and suggest that BASE is more virulent than
classical BSE in humans.***


6:30 Close of Day One


http://www.healthtech.com/2007/tse/day1.asp


SEE STEADY INCREASE IN SPORADIC CJD IN THE USA FROM
1997 TO 2006. SPORADIC CJD CASES TRIPLED, with phenotype
of 'UNKNOWN' strain growing. ...


http://www.cjdsurveillance.com/resources-casereport.html

There is a growing number of human CJD cases, and they were presented last
week in San Francisco by Luigi Gambatti(?) from his CJD surveillance
collection.

He estimates that it may be up to 14 or 15 persons which display selectively
SPRPSC and practically no detected RPRPSC proteins.


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/transcripts/1006-4240t1.htm


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/transcripts/2006-4240t1.pdf

round and round we go, where we stop, nobody knows, GW knows thow, him and the OIE, they know it goes round and round i.e. BSE MRR policy. what goes around, comes around. and it will not be pretty. ...

p.s.

STATEMENT
BY
LESTER M. CRAWFORD, D.V.M., PH.D.
DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF FOOD AND DRUGS
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
BEFORE
THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE, NUTRITION, AND FORESTRY
UNITED STATES SENATE


JANUARY 27, 2004

snip...

Yesterday, Department Secretary Tommy Thompson and FDA Commissioner Mark McClellan announced several additional public health

measures to further strengthen the current robust safeguards that help protect Americans from exposure to the agent that causes BSE and

help prevent the spread of BSE in U.S. cattle. These measures relate to both protections for foods intended for human consumption as well

as additional measures to strengthen FDA’s 1997 final rule regulating animal feed. With respect to human foods, FDA announced that it will

extend to FDA-regulated foods, dietary supplements and cosmetics, restrictions on using specified risk materials that would complement the

recent USDA announcements. Concerning animal feed, the Agency announced a series of measures designed to lower even further the risk

that cattle will be purposefully or inadvertently fed “ruminant” proteins, including, eliminating an exemption in the feed rule that allows mammalian

blood and blood products at slaughter to be fed to ruminants as a protein source; banning the use of “poultry litter” as a feed ingredient for cattle

and other ruminants; prohibiting the use of “plate waste” as a feed ingredient for ruminants, including cattle; and taking steps to further minimize

the possibility of cross-contamination of animal feed via equipment, facilities or production lines.

snip...

http://www.fda.gov/ola/2004/bse0127.html

were still waiting lester. .......

Date: January 18, 2007 at 8:32 am PST


Fourth case of transfusion-associated vCJD infection in the United Kingdom

Editorial team (eurosurveillance.weekly@hpa.org.uk), Eurosurveillance
editorial office

A suspected case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has recently
been diagnosed in a patient in the United Kingdom (UK), who received a blood
transfusion from a donor who later developed vCJD [1]. This is the fourth
case of probable transfusion transmission of vCJD infection in the UK. Three
of the four recipients developed symptoms of vCJD.
The first symptomatic case of vCJD associated with blood transfusion was
identified in December 2003. This individual developed vCJD six and a half
years after transfusion of red cells donated by an individual who developed
symptoms of vCJD three and a half years after donation.

A second case of vCJD 'infection' was identified a few months later in a
person who had received red cells from a donor who developed symptoms of
vCJD 18 months after donation. This patient (the second case) died from
causes unrelated to vCJD five years after transfusion. Post-mortem
investigations found abnormal prion protein in the spleen and a cervical
lymph node., However, prion protein was not found in the brain, and no
pathological features of vCJD were found.

A third case developed symptoms of vCJD six years after receiving a
transfusion of red blood cells, and died two years and eight months later.
The donor of the blood involved developed vCJD about 20 months after
donating it.

These three cases have been published as case reports and in the findings of
the ongoing collaborative study between the National Blood Services, the
National CJD Surveillance Unit, and the Office for National Statistics. This
study aims to collect evidence about transmission of CJD or vCJD via the
blood supply [2,3,4,5].

The new, fourth case is in a patient who developed symptoms of vCJD eight
and a half years after receiving a transfusion of red blood cells from a
donor who developed vCJD about 17 months after this blood was donated [1].
The donor to this case also donated the vCJD-implicated blood transfused to
the third case. As for all other reported clinical vCJD cases that have been
tested for genotype, this patient is a methionine homozygote at codon 129 of
the prion protein gene. The patient is currently alive.

All four cases had received transfusions of non-leucodepleted red blood
cells between 1996 and 1999. Since October 1999, leucocytes have been
removed from all blood used for transfusion in the UK. The effect of
leucodepletion on the reduction of the risk of transmission of vCJD from an
infective donation is uncertain.

This fourth case of vCJD infection associated with blood transfusion further
increases the level of concern about the risk of vCJD transmission between
humans by blood transfusion, although much remains unknown. This reinforces
the importance of the existing precautions that have been introduced to
reduce the risk of transmission of vCJD infection by blood and blood
products [6]. No cases of vCJD have been associated with fractionated plasma
products. The small group of living recipients of vCJD-implicated blood
transfusion in the UK have been informed of their potential exposure to vCJD
by blood transfusion, asked to take certain precautions to reduce the risk
of onward person-to-person transmission of vCJD during health care, and
offered specialist neurological evaluation and advice.

This article has been adapted from reference 1


References:
Health Protection Agency. Fourth case of variant CJD associated with blood
transfusion (press release). Press release, 18 January 2007.
(http://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/news/articles/press_releases/2007/070118_vCJD.htm
)
Llewelyn CA, Hewitt PE, Knight RSG, Amar K, Cousens S, Mackenzie J, et al.
Possible transmission of variant CJD disease by blood transfusion. Lancet
2004; 363:417-21.
Peden AH, Head MW, Ritchie DL, Bell JE, Ironside JW. Preclinical vCJD after
blood transfusion in a PRNP codon 129 heterozygous patient. Lancet 2004 ;
364: 527-9.
Wroe SJ, Pal S, Siddique D, Hyare H, Macfarlane R, et al Clinical
presentation and pre-mortem diagnosis of blood transfusion-associated
variant CJD. Lancet 2006;368:2061-67.
Hewitt PE, Llewelyn CA, Mackenzie J, Will RG. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and
blood transfusion: results of the UK Transfusion Medicine Epidemiology
review study. Vox Sang. 2006;91(3):221-230.
Department of Health [London]. Further precautions to protect blood supply.
Press release 2004/0104, 16 March 2004.
(http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/PressReleases/PressReleasesN
otices/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4076608&chk=MTwE%2Bl)

http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ew/2007/070118.asp#4


TSS




Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: