SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: Bone of contention
Date: December 31, 2006 at 8:17 am PST

In Reply to: Re: Bone of contention posted by TSS on December 28, 2006 at 11:40 am:

Korea-US FTA Talks Enter Critical Point

By Kim Yon-se
Staff Reporter
The next round of talks for a free trade agreement (FTA) between South Korea and the United States will be held in Seoul from Jan. 15-19.

It is the sixth round since negotiations began last June and could be a crucial watershed as the two countries have remained poles apart on major demands.

One of the biggest confrontations has been caused by Korea's recent rejection of U.S. beef shipments in which bone fragments were found, while another is the U.S. rejection of revising its anti-dumping duties imposed on Korean exporters.

Furthermore, the U.S. is putting greater emphasis on the beef import issue following a series of aggressive statements by some government officials and senators, although U.S. chief negotiator Wendy Cutler has told reporters that it is not an FTA item.

In January, the two countries will hold high-level agriculture talks in Korea at the request of Washington which is asking Seoul to allow small bone chips in beef imports.

The possibility that Korea will soften on U.S. beef import rules is high. Some experts forecast Korea to destroy or send back only parts containing bone fragments and allow the sale of the remaining boneless parts.

If Korea sticks to its current position of rejecting all products with bone fragments, the U.S. could boycott the FTA talks in Seoul, an indication of a breakup in the bilateral trade talks.

One of the concerns of the Korean government is placating consumer advocates when it eases import conditions. According to a survey of 651 housewives conducted by the Korea Rural Economic Institute, 70.4 percent of Korean housewives said they would not consume U.S. beef, expressing fears for possible mad cow disease.

Phil Lempert, a food editor of NBC's Today show, had said what concerns consumers is not the cows the U.S. Department of Agriculture finds infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease.

``It is the cows that are not being detected, that are getting into the food supply,'' he said. ``It could be one or two. It could be hundreds.''

Meanwhile, the U.S. repeated its stance of several months ago that it will not revise anti-dumping laws even under an FTA.

A great number of Korean netizens say they don't understand why the Roh Moo-hyun administration is struggling to sign a free trade deal with the U.S.

More and more netizens are indirectly suggesting Korean and U.S. government officials eat American beef with bone fragments on TV before distributing it on the Korean market.

kys@koreatimes.co.kr

12-31-2006 17:36


http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/200612/kt2006123117353510230.htm

>>>Phil Lempert, a food editor of NBC's Today show, had said what concerns consumers is not the cows the U.S. Department of Agriculture finds infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease. <<<

>>>``It is the cows that are not being detected, that are getting into the food supply,'' he said. ``It could be one or two. It could be hundreds.'' <<<

AMEN, exactly, these Korean Housewives know exactly what's going on.





Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: