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From: TSS ()
Subject: Edgerton-area deer tests positive for CWD
Date: December 18, 2006 at 7:38 am PST

Edgerton-area deer tests positive for CWD


An Alberta Fish and Wildlife official is concerned with the discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a deer west of Edgerton; the first positive case to come out of the wildlife management unit which encompasses Edgerton and Chauvin.

John B. Spigott
Monday December 18, 2006

An Alberta Fish and Wildlife official is concerned with the discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a deer west of Edgerton; the first positive case to come out of the wildlife management unit which encompasses Edgerton and Chauvin.
The infected deer from the Edgerton area is one of two new cases announced by Alberta Sustainable Resource Development late last week, and comes from one of the wildlife management units where head submission from harvested deer was deemed mandatory by officials at the beginning of the hunting season. The female mule deer was taken west of Edgerton and was confirmed positive on Dec. 8; as was a male mule deer from the southern portion of the province in the Empress area, west of the Red Deer River.
“The one down south comes from very near the area where we found a cluster of positives last year down in the Empress area,” said Lyle Fullerton, communications officer for Alberta Sustainable Resource Development. “That case fell within the 10-kilometre area of concern we had down there, but the new one up north is one of fairly significant concern for us.”
Fullerton says the new case in the Edgerton area falls about 30 kilometres from the Saskatchewan border, and although Alberta Fish and Wildlife has been testing in the Chauvin area for two winters, this is the only positive reported from that wildlife management unit.

“We’ve probably tested in the neigbourhood of 500 heads in that unit, and all of those were negative,” said Fullerton. “This is the first positive and is fairly concerning to us, especially considering the distance from the Saskatchewan border.”
The positive test in that wildlife management unit didn’t come as a real surprise to Fullerton, but what did come as a surprise is the location of the deer within the unit.
“We were expecting to find something in that area, but most of us were thinking it would be a lot closer to the border,” said Fullerton. “It’s not extraordinary to find an animal moving considerable distances, but to find that one where it is – that’s a little different than where we had been working in the past.”
The positive test puts an even greater emphasis on hunters making sure they submit all the heads of harvested animals for testing, said Fullerton. He said the positive tests show the CWD surveillance program is working.
“We will have to try to formulate a game plan this winter in terms of how we are going to respond to this,” said Fullerton. “We certainly appreciate the effort by hunters and landowners to get their heads in, and it helped us detect this animal. It’s obvious the surveillance program is working.”
The two positive cases bring Alberta’s total deer found with CWD to 15 since the first case in September, 2005.


http://www.meridianbooster.com/News/275832.html


TSS



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