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From: TSS ()
Subject: Slovenia reports new case of mad cow disease
Date: November 5, 2006 at 11:48 am PST

Slovenia reports new case of mad cow disease
05 Nov 2006 17:30:45 GMT
Source: Reuters


LJUBLJANA, Nov 5 (Reuters) - Slovenia's Veterinary Administration said on Sunday a new case of mad cow disease was reported in a 6-year-old cow from Slovenia which was slaughtered in Austria earlier this week.

The cow was from a farm near Murska Sobota in eastern Slovenia and all movements of animals to and from the farm have been prohibited, head of the administration Vida Cadonic Spelic told Slovenian news agency STA.

This is Slovenia's seventh case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in animals, with the last being diagnosed in an ox in August 2005.

First detected in Britain in 1986, BSE caused millions of animals to be slaughtered in Britain in the 1980s and early 1990s. Nearly all European Union countries subsequently reported BSE cases and Sweden saw its first case earlier this year. But the overall incidence of BSE in the EU is falling.


http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L05237053.htm


http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/CrisesArticle.aspx?storyId=L05237053&WTmodLoc=World-R5-Alertnet-3

*** Slovenia 15 768

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Slovenia

Impact Worksheet, November 23, 2001

Page 64 of 98

8/3/2006

Summary: In Slovenia, BSE was confirmed in a five-year old domestically bred cow; this is the first case of BSE in

that country. Slovenia identified the cow as a suspected BSE case during mandatory prionic testing in slaughter cattle.

The Ljubljana, Slovenia National Veterinary Institute confirmed the BSE test through histopathological and

immunohistochemical examinations on 16 November. Positive results were corroborated by the Institute of Animal

Neurology at the University of Bern in Switzerland on 20 November.

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe

including Slovenia. In December 2000, import restrictions regarding BSE were expanded by prohibiting all imports of

rendered animal protein products, regardless of species, from Europe. Slovenia had less than 0.1 percent of the world’s

stocks in cattle, goats, and sheep in 2000. Slovenia’s meat exports were minimal, and destination countries for the live

animal exports were not specified. Slovenia exported meat and bone meal to Austria, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Croatia

in 1999. The US imported no products from Slovenia during 2000 or 2001 that would be of risk for BSE transmission.

In 1998, the US imported small quantities of animal feeds from Slovenia, however, it is not known if these feeds

contained ruminant materials. The infected cow came from a farm in northeast Slovenia.

How extensive is the outbreak of BSE in Slovenia?

BSE has been confirmed in a five-year old cow in Slovenia on 16 November. This is the first case of BSE in Slovenia,

and the cow was domestically bred. Slovenia first identified the cow as a suspected BSE case during routine and

mandatory Western blot prionic testing for BSE in slaughter cattle. The Ljubljana, Slovenia National Veterinary

Institute and the Institute of Animal Neurology Laboratory in Switzerland confirmed the BSE test. The infected cow

came from a small, extensive farm with nine animals in the Zgornja Savinsjka valley in northeast Slovenia. Veterinary

authorities immediately isolated the farm and banned all movement of animals to and from the farm.

Source: Reuters; AgWorldwide Internet news; OIE Weekly Disease Information Reports, 16 and 23 November 2001

What actions has Slovenia taken to protect its livestock from BSE?

Slovenia has a national BSE testing program in place, feeding of meat and bone meal is banned,, and bovine product

imports have been restricted. Use of meat and bone meal has been banned since 1996 as a feed for ruminants, and for

non-ruminants since late 2000.

Beginning February 2001, quick post mortem prionic testing for all slaughtered animals has been mandatory in

Slovenia for all slaughtered animals older than 30 months. In January 2000, Slovenian authorities had conducted 700

histological tests after reports of BSE in Germany and Italy. In February 2000, the government was reportedly

performing 250 prionic tests daily. In 1996 a policy of random testing for animals older than 36 months was

introduced. Since 1992, Slovenia has routinely performed pathohistologic analysis of bovine brains for cattle exhibiting

clinical signs of a central nervous system malady.

Since 1991, Slovenia has incrementally added to the list of European countries from which it bans imports of live

bovine animals, semen and embryos, meat products, gelatin, collagen, raw materials for pharmaceutical use, and other

Page 65 of 98

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bovine products:

Imports banned from

Beginning in year

United Kingdom

1991

Ireland, Switzerland, France, Portugal

1996

Belgium, Netherlands

1998

Germany

2000

Italy

2001

Source: USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service GAIN Report #SI1001, March 27, 2001

What is Slovenia’s production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

Slovenia's stocks of cattle, goats and sheep were less than 0.1 percent of world stocks in 2000 (Table 1). Imports of

cattle were 0.35 percent of the world export trade in 1999, but goat and sheep imports were both less than 0.1 percent.

Cattle imports were exclusively from Central and Eastern Europe and Hungarian imports dominated the Slovenian

market. Slovenia exported only 19 metric tons of cattle in 1999; the number of live animals in this figure was not

available. Goat export values were not available, and sheep exports were less than 0.1 percent of world sheep exports.

Table 1. Slovenia’s live animal stocks and exports and imports of live animals.

Live Animal

2000 Stocks

Trade

1999 Exports

1999 Imports

Head

% World

Head

% World

Head

% World

Cattle

471,425

<0.1%

Page 66 of 98

8/3/2006

-

-

30,000

.36%

Goats

14,643

<0.1%

-

-

19

<0.1%

Sheep

72,533

<0.1%

1

<0.1%

180

<0.1%

Slovenian production was less than 0.1 percent of the world's production of beef and veal and mutton and lamb in 2000

(Table 2). Slovenia imported less than 0.1 percent of the world's beef and veal and mutton and lamb in 1999. Slovenia

also imported 121 metric tons of meat and bone meal from Austria in 1999. Slovenia exported beef and veal in 2000,

accounting for 0.2 percent of world exports; destinations of the beef and veal exports were not specified. Slovenian

exports of meat and bone meal in 1999 totaled 1,527 metric tons to Austria, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Croatia.

Information on goat imports and exports was not available.

Table 2. Production and trade in relevant products by Slovenia.

Products

2000 Production

Trade

1999 Exports

1999 Imports

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Metric ton

% World

Beef and Veal

42,200

<0.1%

3,200

.2%

Page 67 of 98

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130

<0.1%

Mutton and Lamb1

930

<0.1%

-

-

11

<0.1%

Source: United Nations FAO; USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service GAIN Report #SI1001, March 27, 2001

1 Sheep were included in Table 1 and Table 2 as ‘affected’ because USDA/APHIS includes all ruminants and ruminant

products in its restrictions pertaining to BSE. Goat production and trade information was unavailable.

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from Slovenia?

In 2001, 2000 and 1999, no affected animals or animal products were imported from Slovenia. In 1998, the only

affected product imported into the US from Slovenia was 260,000 kg of "Preparations Used in Animal Feedings, Not

Otherwise Specified." It is not known whether this feed contained ruminant materials.

Source: World Trade Atlas

Did the US have restrictions on ruminant imports from Slovenia prior to this case?

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe

including Slovenia until a thorough assessment of the risks of introduction of BSE into the US could be made. Prior to

December 1997, import restrictions were applied only to those countries which had reported cases of BSE in native

animals. Also, importation of ruminant meat from BSE-affected countries was permitted if the meat was deboned and

free of visually identifiable lymphatic and nervous tissue and if it met other restrictions. Import regulations enacted

December 1997 extended the import restrictions to countries which had not had a declared BSE case, yet had risk

factors for BSE occurrence.

These regulatory changes also removed provisions that allowed importation of ruminant meat from the restricted

countries, and thereby prohibited importation of ruminant meat from all Europe. These import restrictions also applied

to bone meal, blood meal, meat meal, offal, fat, glands, and serum from ruminants. In December 2000, APHIS

expanded its import restrictions regarding BSE by prohibiting all imports from Europe of rendered animal protein

products, regardless of species.

Source: USDA, APHIS, VS

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Slovenia?

There were no direct flights from Slovenia to the US in fiscal year 2000.

APHIS-PPQ’s agriculture quarantine inspection monitoring sampled 27 air passengers from Slovenia for items of

agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. One of these 27 passengers was carrying two kilograms of a meat item that

could potentially harbor pathogens that cause BSE. This passenger arrived to Elizabeth, New York, in June 2000 and

Page 68 of 98

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declared no intention to visit a farm or ranch in the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEI’s plans for follow up:

Prior to CEI’s January 2002 quarterly summary of disease events October-December 2001, CEI will review any further

developments in this Slovenian outbreak.

If you need more information or wish to comment, you may reply to this message or contact Jennifer Grannis at (970)

490-7844 or David Cummings at (970) 490-7895.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/taf/iw_2001_files/foreign/bse_slovenia1101.htm

Scientific Steering Committee – Opinion on the GBR of SLOVENIA September 2002

CONCLUSION ON THE CURRENT GBR

The BSE-agent was potentially imported into the country via infected MBM in the mid 90s when

MBM imports peaked. This MBM reached cattle via feed. It can be expected that the 1997 birth

cohort had a much lower chance to be infected because MBM imports decreased dramatically and

the first feed ban was introduced. Although the rendering system was able to reduce BSE

infectivity since 1992, some recycling and propagation may have occurred because SRM were not

removed and therefore rendered.

The first domestic BSE-case in Slovenia was identified in November 2001 and a second case was

confirmed in January 2002. It is therefore confirmed (GBR III) that domestic cattle in Slovenia

are (clinically or pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent at a low incidence.

http://ec.europa.eu/food/fs/sc/ssc/out285_en.pdf

full text ;

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/2006-0011/2006-0011-1.pdf

Docket Management Docket: 02N-0276 - Bioterrorism Preparedness ... TSS) > The data do not provide a species of origin code for these > products, ... NOW, if you read Polands GBR risk assessment and opinion on BSE, ...


http://www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/DOCKETS/02n0276/02N-0276-EC-254.htm

TSS






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