SEARCH VEGSOURCE:

 

 

Follow Ups | Post Followup | Back to Discussion Board | VegSource
See spam or
inappropriate posts?
Please let us know.
  




From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: JOHANNS USDA ET AL WILL STAND UP AND LIE ABOUT USA BSE IN 4 MINUTES
Date: July 20, 2006 at 6:20 pm PST

In Reply to: Re: JOHANNS USDA ET AL WILL STAND UP AND LIE ABOUT USA BSE IN 4 MINUTES posted by TSS on July 20, 2006 at 6:19 pm:

USDA 2004 ENHANCED BSE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AND HOW NOT TO FIND BSE CASES
(OFFICIAL DRAFT OIG REPORT)

snip...

CATTLE With CNS Symptoms Were NOT Always Tested

snip...

Between FYs 2002 and 2004, FSIS condemned 680 cattle of all ages due to CNS
symptoms. About 357 of these could be classified as adult. We could validate
that ONLY 162 were tested for BSE (per APHIS records. ...

snip...

WE interviewed officials at five laboratories that test for rabies. Those
officials CONFIRMED THEY ARE NOT REQUIRED TO SUBMIT RABIES-NEGATIVE SAMPLES
TO APHIS FOR BSE TESTING. A South Dakota laboratory official said they were
not aware they could submit rabies-negative samples to APHIS for BSE
testing. A laboratory official in another State said all rabies-negative
cases were not submitted to APHIS because BSE was ''NOT ON THEIR RADAR
SCREEN." Officials from New York, Wisconsin, TEXAS, and Iowa advised they
would NOT submit samples from animals they consider too young. Four of the
five States contacted defined this age as 24 months; Wisconsin defined it as
30 months. TEXAS officials also advised that they do not always have
sufficient tissue remaining to submit a BSE sample. ...

snip...

FULL TEXT 54 PAGES OF HOW NOT TO FIND BSE IN USA ;

http://www.house.gov/reform/min/pdfs_108_2/pdfs_inves/pdf_food_usda_mad_cow_july_13_ig_rep.pdf

HUMAN TSE USA 2005

Animal Prion Diseases Relevant to Humans (unknown types?)
Thu Oct 27, 2005 12:05
71.248.128.109

About Human Prion Diseases /
Animal Prion Diseases Relevant to Humans

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is a prion
disease of cattle. Since 1986, when BSE was recognized,
over 180,000 cattle in the UK have developed the
disease, and approximately one to three million are
likely to have been infected with the BSE agent, most
of which were slaughtered for human consumption before
developing signs of the disease. The origin of the
first case of BSE is unknown, but the epidemic was
caused by the recycling of processed waste parts of
cattle, some of which were infected with the BSE agent
and given to other cattle in feed. Control measures
have resulted in the consistent decline of the epidemic
in the UK since 1992. Infected cattle and feed exported
from the UK have resulted in smaller epidemics in other
European countries, where control measures were applied
later.

Compelling evidence indicates that BSE can be
transmitted to humans through the consumption of prion
contaminated meat. BSE-infected individuals eventually
develop vCJD with an incubation time believed to be on
average 10 years. As of November 2004, three cases of
BSE have been reported in North America. One had been
imported to Canada from the UK, one was grown in
Canada, and one discovered in the USA but of Canadian
origin. There has been only one case of vCJD reported
in the USA, but the patient most likely acquired the
disease in the United Kingdom. If current control
measures intended to protect public and animal health
are well enforced, the cattle epidemic should be
largely under control and any remaining risk to humans
through beef consumption should be very small. (For
more details see Smith et al. British Medical Bulletin,
66: 185. 2003.)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a prion disease of elk
and deer, both free range and in captivity. CWD is
endemic in areas of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska,
but new foci of this disease have been detected in
Nebraska, South Dakota, New Mexico, Wisconsin,
Mississippi Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Montana, and
Canada. Since there are an estimated 22 million elk and
deer in the USA and a large number of hunters who
consume elk and deer meat, there is the possibility
that CWD can be transmitted from elk and deer to
humans. As of November 2004, the NPDPSC has examined 26
hunters with a suspected prion disease. However, all of
them appeared to have either typical sporadic or
familial forms of the disease. The NPDPSC coordinates
with the Centers for Disease Control and state health
departments to monitor cases from CWD-endemic areas.
Furthermore, it is doing experimental research on CWD
transmissibility using animal models. (For details see
Sigurdson et al. British Medical Bulletin. 66: 199.
2003 and Belay et al. Emerging Infectious Diseases.
10(6): 977. 2004.)

http://www.cjdsurveillance.com/abouthpd-animal.html

SEE STEADY INCREASE IN SPORADIC CJD IN THE USA FROM
1997 TO 2004. SPORADIC CJD CASES TRIPLED, and that is
with a human TSE surveillance system that is terrible
flawed. in 1997 cases of the _reported_ cases of cjd
were at 54, to 163 _reported_ cases in 2004. see stats
here;

p.s. please note the 47 PENDING CASES to Sept. 2005

p.s. please note the 2005 Prion D. total 120(8)
8=includes 51 type pending, 1 TYPE UNKNOWN ???

p.s. please note sporadic CJD 2002(1) 1=3 TYPE UNKNOWN???

p.s. please note 2004 prion disease (6) 6=7 TYPE
UNKNOWN???

http://www.cjdsurveillance.com/resources-casereport.html

CWD TO HUMANS = sCJD ???

AS implied in the Inset 25 we must not _ASSUME_ that
transmission of BSE to other species will invariably
present pathology typical of a scrapie-like disease.

snip...

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1991/01/04004001.pdf

snip...end
full text ;

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

VERY VERY IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER

>> Differences in tissue distribution could require new regulations
>> regarding specific risk material (SRM) removal.

Research Project: Study of Atypical Bse

Location: Virus and Prion Diseases of Livestock

Project Number: 3625-32000-073-07
Project Type: Specific C/A

Start Date: Sep 15, 2004
End Date: Sep 14, 2007

Objective:
The objective of this cooperative research project with Dr. Maria Caramelli
from the Italian BSE Reference Laboratory in Turin, Italy, is to conduct
comparative studies with the U.S. bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
isolate and the atypical BSE isolates identified in Italy. The studies will
cover the following areas: 1. Evaluation of present diagnostics tools used
in the U.S. for the detection of atypical BSE cases. 2. Molecular comparison
of the U.S. BSE isolate and other typical BSE isolates with atypical BSE
cases. 3. Studies on transmissibility and tissue distribution of atypical
BSE isolates in cattle and other species.

Approach:
This project will be done as a Specific Cooperative Agreement with the
Italian BSE Reference Laboratory, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del
Piemonte, in Turin, Italy. It is essential for the U.S. BSE surveillance
program to analyze the effectiveness of the U.S diagnostic tools for
detection of atypical cases of BSE. Molecular comparisons of the U.S. BSE
isolate with atypical BSE isolates will provide further characterization of
the U.S. BSE isolate. Transmission studies are already underway using brain
homogenates from atypical BSE cases into mice, cattle and sheep. It will be
critical to see whether the atypical BSE isolates behave similarly to
typical BSE isolates in terms of transmissibility and disease pathogenesis.
If transmission occurs, tissue distribution comparisons will be made between
cattle infected with the atypical BSE isolate and the U.S. BSE isolate.
Differences in tissue distribution could require new regulations regarding
specific risk material (SRM) removal.

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/projects/projects.htm?ACCN_NO=408490

3.57 The experiment which might have determined whether BSE and scrapie were
caused by the same agent (ie, the feeding of natural scrapie to cattle) was
never undertaken in the UK. It was, however, performed in the USA in 1979,
when it was shown that cattle inoculated with the scrapie agent endemic in
the flock of Suffolk sheep at the United States Department of Agriculture in
Mission, Texas, developed a TSE quite unlike BSE. 32 The findings of the
initial transmission, though not of the clinical or neurohistological
examination, were communicated in October 1988 to Dr Watson, Director of the
CVL, following a visit by Dr Wrathall, one of the project leaders in the
Pathology Department of the CVL, to the United States Department of
Agriculture. 33 The results were not published at this point, since the
attempted transmission to mice from the experimental cow brain had been
inconclusive. The results of the clinical and histological differences
between scrapie-affected sheep and cattle were published in 1995. Similar
studies in which cattle were inoculated intracerebrally with scrapie inocula
derived from a number of scrapie-affected sheep of different breeds and from
different States, were carried out at the US National Animal Disease Centre.
34 The results, published in 1994, showed that this source of scrapie agent,
though pathogenic for cattle, did not produce the same clinical signs of
brain lesions characteristic of BSE.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820543

The findings of the initial transmission, though not of the clinical or
neurohistological examination, were communicated in October 1988 to Dr
Watson, Director of the CVL, following a visit by Dr Wrathall, one of the
project leaders in the Pathology Department of the CVL, to the United States
Department of Agriculture. 33

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1988/10/00001001.pdf

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820546

The results were not published at this point, since the attempted
transmission to mice from the experimental cow brain had been inconclusive.
The results of the clinical and histological differences between
scrapie-affected sheep and cattle were published in 1995. Similar studies in
which cattle were inoculated intracerebrally with scrapie inocula derived
from a number of scrapie-affected sheep of different breeds and from
different States, were carried out at the US National Animal Disease Centre.
34 The
results, published in 1994, showed that this source of scrapie agent, though
pathogenic for cattle, did not produce the same clinical signs of brain
lesions characteristic of BSE.

3.58 There are several possible reasons why the experiment was not performed
in the UK. It had been recommended by Sir Richard Southwood (Chairman of the
Working Party on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy) in his letter to the
Permanent Secretary of MAFF, Mr (now Sir) Derek Andrews, on 21 June 1988, 35
though it was not specifically recommended in the Working Party Report or
indeed in the Tyrrell Committee Report (details of the Southwood Working
Party and the Tyrell Committee can be found in vol. 4: The Southwood Working
Party, 1988-89 and vol. 11: Scientists after Southwood respectively). The
direct inoculation of scrapie into calves was given low priority, because of
its high cost and because it was known that it had already taken place in
the USA. 36 It was also felt that the results of such an experiment would be
hard to interpret. While a negative result would be informative, a positive
result would need to demonstrate that when scrapie was transmitted to
cattle, the disease which developed in cattle was the same as BSE. 37 Given
the large number of strains of scrapie and the possibility that BSE was one
of them, it would be necessary to transmit every scrapie strain to cattle
separately, to test the hypothesis properly. Such an experiment would be
expensive. Secondly, as measures to control the epidemic took hold, the need
for the experiment from the policy viewpoint was not considered so urgent.
It was felt that the results would be mainly of academic interest. 38

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm#820550

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/report/volume2/chaptea3.htm

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCRAPIE

Chair: Dr. Jim Logan, Cheyenne, WY

Vice Chair: Dr. Joe D. Ross, Sonora, TX

Dr. Deborah L. Brennan, MS; Dr. Beth Carlson, ND; Dr. John R. Clifford, DC;
Dr. Thomas F. Conner, OH; Dr. Walter E. Cook, WY; Dr. Wayne E. Cunningham,
CO; Dr. Jerry W. Diemer, TX; Dr. Anita J. Edmondson, CA; Dr. Dee Ellis, TX;
Dr. Lisa A. Ferguson, MD; Dr. Keith R. Forbes, NY; Dr. R. David Glauer, OH;
Dr. James R. Grady, CO; Dr. William L. Hartmann, MN; Dr. Carolyn Inch, CAN;
Dr. Susan J. Keller, ND; Dr. Allen M. Knowles, TN; Dr. Thomas F. Linfield,
MT; Dr. Michael R. Marshall, UT; Dr. Cheryl A. Miller, In; Dr. Brian V.
Noland, CO; Dr. Charles Palmer, CA; Dr. Kristine R. Petrini, MN; Mr. Stan
Potratz, IA; Mr. Paul E. Rodgers, CO; Dr. Joan D. Rowe, CA; Dr. Pamela L.
Smith, IA; Dr. Diane L. Sutton, MD; Dr. Lynn Anne Tesar, SD; Dr. Delwin D.
Wilmot, NE; Dr. Nora E. Wineland, CO; Dr. Cindy B. Wolf, MN.

The Committee met on November 9, 2005, from 8:00am until 11:55am, Hershey
Lodge and Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania. The meeting was called
to order by Dr. Jim Logan, chair, with vice chairman Dr. Joe D. Ross
attending. There were 74 people in attendance.

The Scrapie Program Update was provided by Dr. Diane Sutton, National
Scrapie Program Coordinator, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA),
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS), Veterinary Services
(VS). The complete text of the Status Report is included in these
Proceedings.

Dr. Patricia Meinhardt, USDA-APHIS-VS-National Veterinary Services
Laboratory (NVSL) gave the Update on Genotyping Labs and Discrepancies in
Results. NVSL conducts investigations into discrepancies on genotype testing
results associated with the Scrapie Eradication Program. It is the policy of
the Program to conduct a second genotype test at a second laboratory on
certain individual animals. Occasionally, there are discrepancies in those
results. The NVSL conducts follow-up on these situations through additional
testing on additional samples from the field and archive samples from the
testing laboratories.

For the period of time from January 1, 2005, until October 15, 2005, there
were 23 instances of discrepancies in results from 35 flocks. Of those 23
instances, 14 were caused by laboratory error (paperwork or sample mix-up),
3 results from field error, 5 were not completely resolved, and 1 originated
from the use of a non-approved laboratory for the first test. As a result of
inconsistencies, one laboratory’s certification was revoked by APHIS-VS.

snip...

Infected and Source Flocks

As of September 30, 2005, there were 105 scrapie infected and source flocks.
There were a total of 165** new infected and source flocks reported for FY
2005. The total infected and source flocks that have been released in FY
2005 was 128. The ratio of infected and source flocks cleaned up or placed
on clean up plans vs. new infected and source flocks discovered in FY 2005
was 1.03 : 1*. In addition 622 scrapie cases were confirmed and reported by
the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in FY 2005, of which
130 were RSSS cases. Fifteen cases of scrapie in goats have been reported
since 1990. The last goat case was reported in May 2005. Approximately 5,626
animals were indemnified comprised of 49% non-registered sheep, 45%
registered sheep, 1.4% non-registered goats and 4.6% registered goats.

Regulatory Scrapie Slaughter Surveillance (RSSS)

RSSS was designed to utilize the findings of the Center for Epidemiology and
Animal Health (CEAH) Scrapie: Ovine Slaughter Surveillance (SOSS) study. The
results of SOSS can be found at
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cahm/Sheep/sheep.htm . RSSS started April
1,

2003. It is a targeted slaughter surveillance program which is designed to
identify infected flocks for clean-up. During FY 2005 collections increased
by 32% overall and by 90% for black and mottled faced sheep improving
overall program effectiveness and efficiency as demonstrated by the 26%
decrease in percent positive black faced sheep compared to FY 2004. Samples
have been collected from 62,864 sheep since April 1, 2003, of which results
have been reported for 59,105 of which 209 were confirmed positive. During
FY 2005, 33,137 samples were collected from 81 plants. There have been 130
NVSL confirmed positive cases (30 collected in FY 2004 and confirmed in FY
2005 and 100 collected and confirmed in FY 2005) in FY 2005. Face colors of
these positives were 114 black, 14 mottled, 1 white and 1 unknown. The
percent positive by face color is shown in the chart below.

Scrapie Testing

In FY 2005, 35,845 animals have been tested for scrapie: 30,192 RSSS; 4,742
regulatory field cases; 772 regulatory third eyelid biopsies; 10 third
eyelid validations; and 129 necropsy validations (chart 9).

Animal ID

As of October 04, 2005, 103,580 sheep and goat premises have been assigned
identification numbers in the Scrapie National Generic Database. Official
eartags have been issued to 73,807 of these premises.

*This number based on an adjusted 12 month interval to accommodate the 60
day period for setting up flock plans.

http://www.usaha.org/committees/reports/2005/report-scr-2005.pdf

Date: April 30, 2006 at 4:49 pm PST
SCRAPIE USA UPDATE AS of March 31, 2006

2 NEW CASES IN GOAT, 82 INFECTED SOURCE FLOCKS, WITH 4 NEW INFECTED SOURCE
FLOCKS IN MARCH, WITH 19 SCRAPIE INFECTED RSSS REPORTED BY NVSL

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahps/scrapie/monthly_report/monthly-report.html

Published online before print October 20, 2005

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 10.1073/pnas.0502296102
Medical Sciences

A newly identified type of scrapie agent can naturally infect sheep with
resistant PrP genotypes

( sheep prion | transgenic mice )

Annick Le Dur *, Vincent Béringue *, Olivier Andréoletti , Fabienne Reine *,
Thanh Lan Laï *, Thierry Baron , Bjørn Bratberg ¶, Jean-Luc Vilotte ||,
Pierre Sarradin **, Sylvie L. Benestad ¶, and Hubert Laude *
*Virologie Immunologie Moléculaires and ||Génétique Biochimique et
Cytogénétique, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 78350
Jouy-en-Josas, France; Unité Mixte de Recherche, Institut National de la
Recherche Agronomique-Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Toulouse, Interactions
Hôte Agent Pathogène, 31066 Toulouse, France; Agence Française de Sécurité
Sanitaire des Aliments, Unité Agents Transmissibles Non Conventionnels,
69364 Lyon, France; **Pathologie Infectieuse et Immunologie, Institut
National de la Recherche Agronomique, 37380 Nouzilly, France; and
¶Department of Pathology, National Veterinary Institute, 0033 Oslo, Norway

Edited by Stanley B. Prusiner, University of California, San Francisco, CA,
and approved September 12, 2005 (received for review March 21, 2005)

Scrapie in small ruminants belongs to transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, a family of fatal
neurodegenerative disorders that affect humans and animals and can transmit
within and between species by ingestion or inoculation. Conversion of the
host-encoded prion protein (PrP), normal cellular PrP (PrPc), into a
misfolded form, abnormal PrP (PrPSc), plays a key role in TSE transmission
and pathogenesis. The intensified surveillance of scrapie in the European
Union, together with the improvement of PrPSc detection techniques, has led
to the discovery of a growing number of so-called atypical scrapie cases.
These include clinical Nor98 cases first identified in Norwegian sheep on
the basis of unusual pathological and PrPSc molecular features and "cases"
that produced discordant responses in the rapid tests currently applied to
the large-scale random screening of slaughtered or fallen animals.
Worryingly, a substantial proportion of such cases involved sheep with PrP
genotypes known until now to confer natural resistance to conventional
scrapie. Here we report that both Nor98 and discordant cases, including
three sheep homozygous for the resistant PrPARR allele (A136R154R171),
efficiently transmitted the disease to transgenic mice expressing ovine PrP,
and that they shared unique biological and biochemical features upon
propagation in mice. These observations support the view that a truly
infectious TSE agent, unrecognized until recently, infects sheep and goat
flocks and may have important implications in terms of scrapie control and
public health.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

Author contributions: H.L. designed research; A.L.D., V.B., O.A., F.R.,
T.L.L., J.-L.V., and H.L. performed research; T.B., B.B., P.S., and S.L.B.
contributed new reagents/analytic tools; V.B., O.A., and H.L. analyzed data;
and H.L. wrote the paper.

A.L.D. and V.B. contributed equally to this work.

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

Hubert Laude, E-mail: laude@jouy.inra.fr

www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0502296102

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0502296102v1

12/10/76
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTE ON SCRAPIE
Office Note
CHAIRMAN: PROFESSOR PETER WILDY

snip...

A The Present Position with respect to Scrapie
A] The Problem

Scrapie is a natural disease of sheep and goats. It is a slow
and inexorably progressive degenerative disorder of the nervous system
and it ia fatal. It is enzootic in the United Kingdom but not in all
countries.

The field problem has been reviewed by a MAFF working group
(ARC 35/77). It is difficult to assess the incidence in Britain for
a variety of reasons but the disease causes serious financial loss;
it is estimated that it cost Swaledale breeders alone $l.7 M during
the five years 1971-1975. A further inestimable loss arises from the
closure of certain export markets, in particular those of the United
States, to British sheep.

It is clear that scrapie in sheep is important commercially and
for that reason alone effective measures to control it should be
devised as quickly as possible.

Recently the question has again been brought up as to whether
scrapie is transmissible to man. This has followed reports that the
disease has been transmitted to primates. One particularly lurid
speculation (Gajdusek 1977) conjectures that the agents of scrapie,
kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and transmissible encephalopathy of
mink are varieties of a single "virus". The U.S. Department of
Agriculture concluded that it could "no longer justify or permit
scrapie-blood line and scrapie-exposed sheep and goats to be processed
for human or animal food at slaughter or rendering plants" (ARC 84/77)"
The problem is emphasised by the finding that some strains of scrapie
produce lesions identical to the once which characterise the human
dementias"

Whether true or not. the hypothesis that these agents might be
transmissible to man raises two considerations. First, the safety
of laboratory personnel requires prompt attention. Second, action
such as the "scorched meat" policy of USDA makes the solution of the
acrapie problem urgent if the sheep industry is not to suffer
grievously.

snip...

76/10.12/4.6

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/yb/1976/10/12004001.pdf






Follow Ups:



Post a Followup

Name:
E-mail: (optional)
Subject:

Comments:

Optional Link URL:
Link Title:
Optional Image URL: