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From: TSS ()
Subject: An Economic Chronology of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in North America
Date: July 6, 2006 at 1:21 pm PST

An Economic Chronology of

Bovine Spongiform

Encephalopathy in North

America

Kenneth H. Mathews, Jr., Monte Vandeveer, and

Ronald A. Gustafson

Abstract

The first confirmed cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in

Canada and the United States had significant effects on trade and prices of

U.S. cattle and beef. However, these incidents occurred during a period of

low U.S. beef supplies, near-record beef prices, and strong domestic

demand for beef that was largely unshaken by the BSE announcement. Also,

U.S. reliance on beef and cattle exports, roughly 10 percent of production,

was not so great as to cause burdensome increases in domestic supplies.

Increased regulations, however, imposed additional costs on beef production

and processing sectors. Canadian cattle and beef are now able to enter the

United States, though with some restrictions. U.S. beef exports to Japan

resumed for a short time beginning in December 2005 but have been

suspended since January 20, 2006. ...

snip...

see full text 18 pages ;

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/ldp/2006/06Jun/ldpm14301/ldpm14301.pdf

Suppressed peer review of Harvard study October 31, 2002

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/oa/topics/BSE_Peer_Review.pdf

Mad Cow Disease: An Evaluation of a Small Feed Testing Program FDA
Implemented in 2003 With Recommendations for Making the Program a Better
Oversight Tool. GAO-06-157R, October 11

http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-06-157R


[GAO-05-101 ] Mad Cow Disease: FDA's Management of the Feed Ban Has Improved, but Oversight Weaknesses Continue to Limit Program Effectiveness
Size: 104986 , Score: 1000 , TEXT , PDF , SUMMARY


http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi?IPaddress=162.140.64.88&filename=d05101.txt&directory=/diskb/wais/data/gao

[2]

[GAO-05-101 ] Mad Cow Disease: FDA's Management of the Feed Ban Has Improved, but Oversight Weaknesses Continue to Limit Program Effectiveness
Size: 104986 , Score: 1000 , TEXT , PDF , SUMMARY

http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/useftp.cgi?IPaddress=162.140.64.88&filename=d05101.txt&directory=/diskb/wais/data/gao


[Docket No. 03-025IFA] FSIS Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food and Requirement for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle

https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/regpublic.nsf/0/eff9eff1f7c5cf2b87256ecf000df08d?OpenDocument

03-025IF 03-025IF-631 Linda A. Detwiler [PDF]

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IF/03-025IF-631.pdf

Specified Risk Materials (SRMs)

I am in full support of the interim final rule which prohibits SRMs from

being included in food for human consumption. In addition to the list of

tissues published in this rule, I am requesting that additional tissues be

added to the list. These would include dura

("sheath") covering the spinal cord and the ENTIRE INTESTINE (from pylorus

to rectum). The scientific justification is provided below. THESE SRMs

should also be prohibited from ANY FDA regulated food or product intended

for human consumption, including but not limited to flavorings, extracts,

etc. ...

Dr. Linda Detwiler comments in full;

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IF/03-025IF-634.pdf

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR) of the United States of America (USA)
Last updated: 19 July 2005
Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)

Report
http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_v2_en1.pdf
Summary
http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_summary_en1.pdf
Summary of the Scientific Report

The European Food Safety Authority and its Scientific Expert Working Group on the Assessment of the Geographical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Risk (GBR) were asked by the European Commission (EC) to provide an up-to-date scientific report on the GBR in the United States of America, i.e. the likelihood of the presence of one or more cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well as clinically, in USA. This scientific report addresses the GBR of USA as assessed in 2004 based on data covering the period 1980-2003.

The BSE agent was probably imported into USA and could have reached domestic cattle in the middle of the eighties. These cattle imported in the mid eighties could have been rendered in the late eighties and therefore led to an internal challenge in the early nineties. It is possible that imported meat and bone meal (MBM) into the USA reached domestic cattle and leads to an internal challenge in the early nineties.

A processing risk developed in the late 80s/early 90s when cattle imports from BSE risk countries were slaughtered or died and were processed (partly) into feed, together with some imports of MBM. This risk continued to exist, and grew significantly in the mid 90’s when domestic cattle, infected by imported MBM, reached processing. Given the low stability of the system, the risk increased over the years with continued imports of cattle and MBM from BSE risk countries.

EFSA concludes that the current GBR level of USA is III, i.e. it is likely but not confirmed that domestic cattle are (clinically or pre-clinically) infected with the BSE-agent. As long as there are no significant changes in rendering or feeding, the stability remains extremely/very unstable. Thus, the probability of cattle to be (pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE-agent persistently increases.


Publication date: 20 August 2004

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573_it.html


http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_summary_en1.pdf


http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_biohaz02_usa_report_v2_en1.pdf

TSS





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