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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: BUSH MAD COW BSE MRR POLICY OF SPREADING TSE GLOBALLY SPREADS TO CANADA
Date: June 9, 2006 at 4:02 pm PST

In Reply to: BUSH MAD COW BSE MRR POLICY OF SPREADING TSE GLOBALLY SPREADS TO CANADA posted by TSS on June 9, 2006 at 6:13 am:

seems this is a slightly different version. ...tss


Mad-cow feed ban awaits U.S. action: Ottawa under pressure to
'harmonize with the Americans,' federal official says
The Edmonton Journal
Thu 08 Jun 2006
Page: A5
Section: News
Byline: Margaret Munro
Dateline: VANCOUVER
Source: CanWest News Service
Edition: Final
Story Type: Business
Length: 552 words
VANCOUVER - The federal government is being
pressured to wait for American action before banning
the use of cattle brains and other "high risk" material
in all animal feed, pet food and fertilizer to prevent
the spread of mad-cow disease.
"There has been a lot of pushback from industry, they
want to harmonize with the Americans," says Dr.
Graham Clarke, director of the animal industry
division at Agriculture and Agri-food Canada.
He told a meeting on brain-wasting diseases here this
week the government "is obviously listening" to the
arguments and couldn't say when the long-awaited
ban would go into force.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced in
2004 it would follow Europe's lead and ban use of
"specified risk material," or SRM, in animal feed and
fertilizer. SRM includes condemned cattle and dead
stock, as well as the brains, spinal cords, tonsils,
eyeballs and bits of small intestine from cattle that
can harbour high concentrations of prions, the
infectious agents believed to cause bovine
spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as
mad-cow disease.
Canada currently has a partial ban on the use of cattle
slaughter waste. In 1997, the government banned the
feeding of cattle remains back to cattle and other
ruminants, but it still allows cattle remains and SRMs
to be used in feed for chickens, hogs and pets.
There's concern and evidence that
cross-contamination of feed streams can contribute to
the spread of the infectious and persistent prions
implicated in BSE. At the urging of an international
team of animal health experts, CFIA, in 2004,
proposed the SRM ban.
Clarke said Agri-food Canada has consulted with the
provinces and industry, produced a detailed plan for
collecting and handling SRMs and the government
has allocated $80 million to help implement the ban.
But he couldn't say when the government would
enact the legislation to end use of SRM in feed -- a
ban consumer groups and leading scientists say is
long overdue.
"In my opinion, the enhanced feed ban should be
instituted as soon as possible," says Dr. Neil
Cashman, scientific director of PrioNet Canada, a
research network studying prion diseases such as
BSE.
He's echoed by several scientists, including a leading
U.S. expert on BSE.
"Canada has to do what is important for Canada, to
protect Canada," Dr. Linda Detwiler, of the
University of Maryland, told the meeting.
She said in an interview that eliminating diseased
cattle and high-risk organs from the animal food
chain is scientifically sound, and the U.S. should
introduce a similar ban. "The U.S. needs to follow
Canada's lead," said Detwiler.
Clarke told the meeting it would be ideal if Canada
and the U.S. could ban use of SRM at the same time
since so much livestock and feed crosses the border.
Canada has uncovered five homegrown cases of mad
cow disease so far, and the United States has reported
three cases.
While there have been no trade sanctions resulting
from the two Canadian cases to turn up this year,
earlier cases provoked U.S. and Japanese embargoes
on imports of Canadian cows and beef that cost
Canada's cattle farmers billions before they were
lifted last year.
The most recent Canadian case of BSE was in a dairy
cow in B.C. in April. The possibility of
cross-contamination of feed is being examined as a
possible source of the infection. .......






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