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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: Potential Case of BSE MAD COW Identified in B.C.
Date: April 13, 2006 at 12:43 pm PST

In Reply to: Potential Case of BSE MAD COW Identified in B.C. posted by TSS on April 13, 2006 at 8:55 am:

PRB 04-12E
CHRONOLOGY OF BSE-RELATED EVENTS
AND GOVERNMENT INITIATIVES

Prepared by:
Marc LeBlanc
Economics Division
Revised 20 September 2005
20 May 2003

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announces the discovery of a
single case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Alberta. Borders
are immediately closed to all live Canadian cattle and other ruminants, beef
and other meat derived from ruminants.


18 June 2003

Federal, provincial and territorial Ministers of Agriculture (except for
Quebec) announce a cost-shared National BSE Recovery Program to provide
temporary assistance to the beef industry so that it may continue to operate
while borders are closed. The estimated cost of the program is $460
million, of which the federal portion is $276 million and the
provincial/territorial portion is $184 million.

26 June 2003

A group of international experts from the “Office international des
epizooties” (OIE) tables its Report on Actions Taken by Canada in Response
to the Confirmation of an Indigenous Case of BSE.


18 July 2003

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) announces measures requiring the
removal of specified risk materials (SRM) from carcasses of cattle older
than 30 months. SRM are tissues that, in infected cattle, harbour the BSE
agent. The new SRM policy comes into effect on 24 July 2003.


21 July 2003

Quebec joins the National BSE Recovery Program.


7 August 2003

Bison, elk, deer and sheep are included in the National BSE Recovery Program
in Alberta.


8 August 2003

The United States announces a partial reopening of its border by allowing
imports of boneless meat from cattle less than 30 months old, and boneless
meat from calves 36 weeks or younger.


11 August 2003

Mexico announces similar measures.


12 August 2003

AAFC announces two new measures: the first provides a $36-million federal
extension to the National BSE Recovery Program (combined with additional
support from the provinces, the extension could top $60 million). The
second measure provides advanced disaster assistance payments to producers
as a transition measure until the Canadian Agricultural Income Stabilization
(CAIS) program comes into force.


25 August 2003

Canada, the United States and Mexico submit a joint letter to the OIE
requesting an internationally agreed-upon, science-based, risk-based trade
response to BSE.


9 September 2003

Russia allows the partial resumption of beef imports, for both cattle less
than 30 months old and cattle over 30 months if tested and certified
negative for BSE.


31 October 2003

The United States proposes to amend its BSE regulations by creating a new
category of “low-incidence countries,” which would have the effect of ending
the import ban on live Canadian cattle less than 30 months. The proposed
rule is subject to comment and input from the industry and would include new
protocols for the resumption of imports of live ruminants and ruminant
products.


4 November 2003

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food tables
a report entitled The Investigation and the Government Response Following
the Discovery of a Single Case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, which
includes seven recommendations. The Standing Committee recommends, notably,
that SRM be excluded from animal feed as recommended by the group of
international experts in their Report on Actions Taken by Canada in Response
to the Confirmation of an Indigenous Case of BSE. The Committee also asks
the Competition Bureau to launch “an investigation into the pricing of beef
at the processing and retail levels.” In a letter to the Standing Committee
’s Chair, the Competition Bureau responds that it is not in a position to
initiate such an inquiry.


21 November 2003

The Cull Animal Program is announced to help producers deal with older
animals. The program is cost-shared with the provinces. The federal
government commits $120 million; the provincial contribution could be up to
$80 million.


11 December 2003

The CAIS program is officially launched.


23 December 2003

A positive BSE test result from a single cow in Washington State is
announced.


24 December 2003

The federal government announces interim import restrictions on U.S. beef.
Canada will continue to import U.S. boneless beef from cattle aged less than
30 months, live cattle destined for immediate slaughter, and dairy products,
semen, embryos and protein-free tallow.


6 January 2004

DNA testing indicates that the BSE-infected animal detected in Washington
State was born in Alberta.


9 January 2004

The federal government announces a commitment of $92.1 million over five
years to enhance measures for identification, tracking and tracing, and to
increase BSE surveillance and testing.


13 January 2004

The federal government announces a commitment to bilateral technical
discussions between Canadian and Japanese officials to examine ways to
re-establish Canadian beef exports.


16 January 2004

In joint statements, the United States, Canada and Mexico agree to enhance
efforts to increase harmonization and equivalence of BSE regulations in
North America.


16 February 2004

Slaughter provision is removed from the Cull Animal Program, meaning that
producers no longer have to wait until cattle are slaughtered to receive
program support.


4 March 2004

AAFC announces that the United States will reopen the comment period on a
rule that would amend regulations regarding the importation of certain
classes of live cattle and animal products from countries – including
Canada – with a minimal risk of BSE.


22 March 2004

The federal government announces the Transitional Industry Support Program
(TISP), which will provide:

1) $680 million for producers of cattle and other ruminants. Producers
will receive a flat-rate payment based on their herd inventories (except for
mature bulls and cows);

2) $250 million in transition payments to help producers address income
challenges in moving to the new CAIS program;

3) $65 million to “top up” the Canadian Farm Income Program for the 2002
program year.


1 April 2004

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Food tables
a report entitled Canadian Livestock and Beef Pricing in the Aftermath of
the BSE Crisis. The report includes five recommendations, notably that the
Minister of Industry instruct the Commissioner of Competition to conduct an
inquiry into the pricing of slaughter cattle and beef, and that an
independent body be engaged to conduct a comprehensive study of the
competitive aspects of the cattle and beef products industry in Canada.


2 April 2004

End of the U.S. comment period on the proposed rule that would allow the
importation of live Canadian cattle and other ruminants to the United
States.


14 April 2004

The Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry tables a report
entitled The BSE Crisis – Lessons for the Future. The Committee recommends
that part of the venture capital funding announced in the 2004 federal
Budget be directed toward additional value-added capacities in the livestock
sector, and that a permanent NAFTA agricultural secretariat be set up with
the mandate to make recommendations for actions by NAFTA partners to
regulate the trade flow when a sanitary or phytosanitary issue occurs.


18 April 2004

The United States lifts import restrictions on ground beef, bone-in cuts of
beef and offal from animals younger than 30 months. The import of live cows
and meat from older animals from Canada remains banned.


22 April 2004

R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America files a complaint against the U.S.
Department of Agriculture (USDA) in a U.S. District Court for the District
of Montana to halt the importation into the United States of an expanded
list of Canadian beef products (bone-in meat, ground beef, etc.).


27 April 2004

R-CALF and the USDA reach an agreement, but confusion about which products
are acceptable and from which slaughter facilities causes imports to
decrease.


9 July 2004

The federal government announces that it will introduce new animal feed
restrictions to strengthen safeguards against BSE. The government intends
to require the removal of bovine SRMs from the animal feed chain. These
tissues are already removed from all animals slaughtered for human
consumption.


12 August 2004

Canadian Cattlemen for Fair Trade, a group of Canadian cattle producers,
files a lawsuit against the U.S. government seeking $150 million under a
provision of NAFTA.


10 September 2004

The federal government announces a strategy to reposition Canada’s livestock
industry. The government commits federal funding of up to $488 million.
The strategy will contain the following elements:

1) Continue efforts to reopen the U.S. border;

2) Facilitate the increase in domestic slaughter capacity ($66.2 million);

3) Assist the industry until slaughter capacity is increased via CAIS,
TISP, cattle and feeder set-aside programs, and other programs ($384.7
million);

4) Increase the international market share for Canadian beef ($37.1
million).


14 October 2004

Canada and China sign two protocols to restore trade in livestock genetics.
These protocols cover the import conditions for Canadian bull semen and
cattle embryos to China.


23 October 2004

U.S. and Japanese officials reach a framework agreement that determines the
conditions under which the trade of beef products will resume.


20 November 2004

The USDA completes the drafting of a new rule that will allow the resumption
of trade in live cattle and ruminants. The rule is forwarded to the U.S.
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for final approval. The rule
identifies regions where there is “minimal risk” of BSE and provides for the
importation into the United States of live cattle less than 30 months for
immediate slaughter or for feeding, provided they are slaughtered before
reaching the age of 30 months. It also allows the importation of meat from
cattle over 30 months and removes segregation requirements at Canadian
slaughter facilities.


1 December 2004

Hong Kong resumes trade in Canadian boneless beef from animals less than 30
months.


30 December 2004

The U.S. OMB completes its review of the proposed “minimal risk” rule on BSE
and returns it to the USDA for publication in the Federal Register. The
rule is expected to take effect on 7 March 2005.

AAFC announces that preliminary tests have identified BSE in a 10-year-old
dairy cow.


11 January 2005

The CFIA announces the detection of BSE in an Alberta beef cow just under 7
years of age. The animal was born in March 1998, after the 1997 feed ban.
Contaminated feed produced prior to the introduction of the 1997 feed ban is
suggested as the most likely source of infection.


21 January 2005

Mike Johanns is sworn in as the 28th Secretary of the USDA. Johanns
replaces Secretary Ann M. Veneman.


31 January 2005

The CFIA announces proposed regulations to remove import restrictions that
were introduced following the detection of BSE in Washington State on 23
December 2003. The CFIA plans to permit the importation of U.S. live cattle
born in 1998 or later, and U.S. beef from cattle of any age from which SRMs
have been removed.


9 February 2005

Secretary Johanns announces that because the U.S. investigations into recent
BSE cases in Canada are not complete, the USDA will delay the effective date
for allowing imports of beef from animals 30 and over.


14 February 2005

The House of Commons Agriculture Committee tables a status report, Financial
Analysis Relative to Meat Packing Companies in the Context of the BSE Crisis
of 2003. Based on information from five meat packing companies, the report
finds that these companies had incurred higher expenditures in 2003 but also
reported higher gross and net profit margins than in previous years.


25 February 2005

The USDA releases its assessment of the Canadian ruminant-to-ruminant feed
ban. The report states that “Canada has a robust inspection program, that
overall compliance with the feed ban is good and that the feed ban is
reducing the risk of transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the
Canadian cattle population.”


2 March 2005

The U.S. District Court in Montana issues a preliminary injunction
preventing the USDA “minimal risk” rule from taking effect until R-CALF’s
April 2004 case against the USDA is heard.


3 March 2005

The U.S. Senate votes to disapprove the USDA “minimal risk” rule that would
permit trade to resume in Canadian beef and cattle less than 30 months of
age.


10 March 2005

AAFC announces a $50-million contribution to the Canadian Cattlemen’s
Association’s Legacy Fund to help launch a campaign to reclaim and expand
markets for Canadian beef.


17 March 2005

The U.S. Department of Justice, on behalf of the USDA, files a request with
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit asking that the court overturn
the decision issued by the U.S. District Court in Montana.


29 March 2005

AAFC announces $1 billion in assistance through the Farm Income Payment
Program (FIP), which will provide a general payment to all eligible Canadian
producers and a direct payment to cattle and ruminant producers. The payment
is a per-head amount based on inventory as of 23 December 2003.


31 March 2005

Cuba reopens its border to live Canadian cattle and beef products.


1 April 2005

Canada, the United States and Mexico release a harmonized North American BSE
strategy.


21 April 2005

The Conservative Party of Canada announces its intention to file for
intervener status in the Montana court case.


29 April 2005

The Competition Bureau concludes its examination into Canadian cattle and
beef pricing. The Bureau finds no evidence of collusion or abuse of
dominance by beef packers or growers.


19 May 2005

The Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry release an interim
report, Cattle Slaughter Capacity in Canada. The Committee makes a number of
recommendations aimed at facilitating the increase in slaughter capacity in
Canada.


26 Mary 2005

The OIE updates its guidelines (the International Animal Health Code chapter
on BSE) to reflect the latest science, the low risk associated with BSE and
the effectiveness of risk mitigation measures.


29 June 2005

The USDA confirms that BSE was found in a 12-year-old beef cow born and
raised in Texas.


14 July 2005

Ruling of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in the United States overturns
the preliminary injunction issued by the District Court in Montana.


18 July 2005

Canadian live cattle shipments are permitted to enter the United States.
Eligible shipments include cattle and bison less than 30 months of age for
immediate slaughter and feeding.

http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0412-e.htm

http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0412-f.htm


MAD COW DISEASE
AND CANADA'S CATTLE INDUSTRY

Prepared by:
Frédéric Forge, Science and Technology Division
Jean-Denis Fréchette, Principal, Economics Division
Revised 12 July 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT BSE

BSE IN CANADA BEFORE 2003
A. The 1993 Case
B. BSE Monitoring
C. Measures to Prevent the Emergence of the Disease in Canada….

MAY 2003: A NEW CASE OF MAD COW DISEASE
A. Results of the Investigation
B. Suggested Additional Measures

BSE: THE NORTH AMERICAN ISSUE

CONSEQUENCES FOR CANADA’S CATTLE INDUSTRY
A. Resuming Export Trade
1. The American Border
2. International Trade Rules: Complying with National Health Measures
B. Repositioning the Industry

CONCLUSION

CHRONOLOGY

APPENDIX: BEEF PRODUCT EXPORTS

see full text;


http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0301-e.htm


http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0301-f.htm

CANADIAN FEED POLICY AND BSE

Prepared by:
Frédéric Forge
Science and Technology Division
11 July 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

USE OF ANIMAL PROTEIN IN FEED

REGULATIONS COVERING BSE-RELATED FEED CONTROL

A. The 1997 Feed Ban
B. Review of the 1997 Feed Ban
C. Proposed Amendments to the 1997 Feed Ban

FEED IMPORTS

A. Import Policy
B. Import Statistics

CONCLUSION: BANNING “CANNIBALISM” IN THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY?

APPENDIX 1 – CURRENT AND PREVIOUS BSE IMPORT POLICIES

APPENDIX 2 – DATA ON SELECTED CANADIAN IMPORTS, 1995-2003


http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0506-e.htm

http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/library/PRBpubs/prb0506-f.htm

EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR)
of Canada
Adopted July 2004 (Question N° EFSA-Q-2003-083)
[Last updated 08 September 2004]

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/564/sr02_bioh
az02_canada_report_v2_en1.pdf

Docket No. 03-080-1 -- USDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE TO ALLOW LIVE ANIMAL
IMPORTS FROM CANADA


https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/BSEcom.nsf/0/b78ba677e2b0c12185256dd300649f9dOp
enDocument&AutoFramed

Suppressed peer review of Harvard study October 31, 2002

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/oa/topics/BSE_Peer_Review.pdf

USA AND MEXICO EFSA Scientific Report on the Assessment of the Geographical
BSE-Risk (GBR)

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/565/sr04_bioh
az02_mexico_report_v2_en1.pdf

http://www.efsa.eu.int/science/tse_assessments/gbr_assessments/573/sr03_bioh
az02_usa_report_v2_en1.pdf


Subject: Substances Prohibited from Use in Animal Food or Feed, Proposed
Rule, Docket No. 2002N-0273 C-534 VOL 45 (PhRMA) and Entered On February 17,
2006
Date: March 10, 2006 at 5:23 pm PST

Marie A. Vodicka, PhD

Assistant Vice President

Biologics & Blotechnology

Scientlflc & Regulatory Affairs

SCIENCE & REG AFFAIRS

Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305)

Food and Drug Administration

5630 Fishers Lane, rrn . 1061

Rackville, MD 20862

Re: Substances Prohibited from Use in Animal Food or Feed, Proposed Rule,
Docket

No. 2002N-0273

February 14, 2006

Dear Sir or Madam :

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) is
providing

comment to the proposed rules issued. ......

snip...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0273/02n-0273-c000534-01-vol45.p
df


Subject: Docket No: 2002N-0273 (formerly Docket No. 02N-0273) Substances
Prohibited From Use in Animal Food and Feed PAUL BROWN
Date: January 20, 2006 at 9:31 am PST

December 20,2005

Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305)

Food and Drug Administration

5630 Fishers Lane

Room 1061

Rockville, MD 20852

Re: Docket No: 2002N-0273 (formerly Docket No. 02N-0273)

Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food and Feed

Dear Sir or Madame:

As scientists and Irecognized experts who have worked in the field of TSEs
for

decades, we are deeply concerned by the recent discoveries of indigenous BSE
infected

cattle in North America and appreciate the opportunity to submit comments to
this very.........

snip...

Given that BSE can be transmitted to cattle via an oral route with just .OO1
gram of infected tissue, it may not take much
infectivity to contaminate feed and keep the disease recycling. ........


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0273/02n-0273-c000490-vol40.pdf


December 19, 2005

Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305)

Food and Drug Administration

5630 Fishers Lane

Room 1061

Rockville, MD 20852

Re: Docket No: 2002N-0273 (formerly Docket No. 02N-0273)

Substances Prohibited From Use in Animal Food and Feed

Dear Sir or Madame:

The McDonald’s Corporation buys more beef than any other restaurant in the
United States. It is

essential for our customers and our company that the beef has the highest
level of safety.

Concerning BSE, ...........

snip.......

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0273/02n-0273_emc-000134-02.pdf

THE SEVEN 1/2 SCIENTIST REPORT ON BSE/TSE ***


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0273/02n-0273-EC244-Attach-1.pdf


***

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/Comments/03-025IFA/03-025IFA-2.pdf

Docket No. 2003N-0312 Animal Feed Safety System

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/03n0312/03N-0312_emc-000001.txt


Docket Management Docket: 02N-0273 - Substances Prohibited From Use in

Animal Food or Feed; Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed

Comment Number: EC -10

Accepted - Volume 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be07.html

PART 2


http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/03/Jan03/012403/8004be09.html

PDF]Freas, William TSS SUBMISSION

File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat -

Page 1. J Freas, William From: Sent: To: Subject: Terry S. Singeltary

Sr. [flounder@wt.net] Monday, January 08,200l 3:03 PM freas ...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3681s2_09.pdf

Asante/Collinge et al, that BSE transmission to the 129-methionine

genotype can lead to an alternate phenotype that is indistinguishable

from type 2 PrPSc, the commonest _sporadic_ CJD;

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/03/slides/3923s1_OPH.htm


GOD LOVES THE DIXIE CHICKS AND SO DO I, they were right all along !


TSS





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