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From: TSS ()
Subject: ALABAMA BSE UPDATE March 30, 2006 - Senate Passes Animal ID Bill (BSE) and FDA says impossible to indentify feed source
Date: March 30, 2006 at 7:07 pm PST

March 30, 2006 - Senate Passes Animal ID Bill (BSE)
MONTGOMERY – Commissioner Ron Sparks and State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Frazier with the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) and the USDA have provided an update on their ongoing joint investigation of the cow that died from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Alabama.

March 30, 2006 - Senate Passes Animal ID Bill (BSE)

Today, the Alabama State Senate passed HB 254 with a vote of 20-6. This bill will provide for the confidentiality of information initially gathered by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries as the department implements and maintains a database for Animal Identification in accord and consistent with the United States Department of Agriculture's National Animal Identification System. Premises ID Registration has been implemented in the last year and Animal ID Registration is not far behind. The information on premises and animals, gathered at the request of Commissioner Sparks, is to protect the interest of public health, safety, and welfare.

“The Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries’ system will comply with any USDA policies and we will not implement an animal ID system that would hurt Alabama farmers whether they raise 2 animals or 2,000 animals,” said Sparks. “I truly appreciate what the legislature has done for the farmers and consumers of Alabama.”

As of today, 14 locations and 44 movements of cattle have been examined with 39 of those being substantially completed. Additional investigations of locations and herds will continue. This process is to eliminate herds from the ongoing investigation.

A flow chart showing how the traceback process is progressing has been posted on the Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries website www.agi.alabama.gov. As the chart illustrates, the investigation has broadened to include many farms and stockyards. The farms are where the index cow may have lived previously or where her immediate family members may have lived. The stockyards are places where investigators have reviewed records of transactions and conducted interviews. Each link is being thoroughly examined and then, based on the information collected the link will either continue on to another location or be closed.

Federal and state officials have stressed that it may not be possible to trace the index cow to her herd of origin due to the primitive traceback methods being used in the investigation. Eventually, leads in the case may be exhausted despite their best efforts.

The next update from ADAI will be sent Monday, April 3rd.

http://www.agi.state.al.us/press_releases/march-30-2006---senate-passes-animal-id-bill-bse?pn=2

Alabama BSE Case Trace Investigation March 29, 2006 chart

http://www.agi.state.al.us/uploads/wU/tL/wUtLnjRP_GE4XN_SybLv6Q/External-BSE-Chart.pdf

Epidemiology Updates

March 30, 2006
As of today, 14 locations and 44 movements of cattle have been examined with 39 of those being substantially completed. Additional investigations of locations and herds will continue. A location includes stockyards or farms where the index cow lived previously or where her immediate family members may have lived. The movements include any arrivals or departures from those locations.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/bse/bse_al_epi-update.shtml

FDA: US Won't Likely Find Source Of Latest BSE Infection

WASHINGTON (Dow Jones)--Government investigators looking into the latest case of mad-cow disease in the U.S. won't likely be able to find the source of the cow's infection, a Food and Drug Administration official said Thursday.

Stephen Sundlof, director of FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine, told reporters, "It's going to be nearly impossible to identify any particular feed."

Mad-cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, is believed to be spread among cattle through feed containing infected cattle parts. The FDA has prohibited bovine material from being included in cattle feed since 1997.

If FDA could find the producer of the tainted feed that infected the cow - found on an Alabama farm earlier this month - it might be able to find how widely the feed was distributed.

But U.S. Department of Agriculture officials believe the cow was at least 10 years old when she was euthanized by a local veterinarian on the Alabama farm where she had resided for less than a year.

snip...full text;

http://www.cattlenetwork.com/content.asp?contentid=26643

> But U.S. Department of Agriculture officials believe the cow was at least 10 years old


yea, and they believed no mad cows were not in the USA either. wrong! and i can list many other things they believed about human and animal TSE that they were wrong about, but i have listed them here before.

i dont believe them. you can do test on the teeth to determine how old they are, better than detention. where is the head??? show me the data, this is what others should be asking. ...

TSS



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