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From: TSS ()
Subject: Re: PRO/AH/EDR> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM)
Date: December 13, 2005 at 9:34 am PST


New Mexico Department of Game and Fish
Media contact: Dan Williams, (505) 476-8004
Public contact: (505) 476-8000
dan.williams@state.nm.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, DEC. 9, 2005:

TWO NEW MEXICO ELK TEST POSITIVE FOR CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE

SANTA FE – Two elk killed in the southern Sacramento Mountains of southeast New Mexico have tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), the Department of Game and Fish announced. The animals were the first elk in New Mexico to test positive for CWD since the disease was first discovered in mule deer in 2002.

Both CWD-afflicted elk were killed in an area 10 to 15 miles southeast of Cloudcroft in Game Management Unit 34, the same general area where the state's most recent case of CWD was detected in a mule deer. One of the elk – a mature male -- was taken Oct. 3 by a hunter and showed no symptoms of the disease. The other elk – a yearling female -- was in very poor condition and unable to stand when a Department of Game and Fish conservation officer found it Oct. 1. Testing and verification of the samples required about two months. Future testing is expected to occur more quickly as the Department of Game and Fish and the Veterinary Diagnostic Services in the New Mexico Department of Agriculture further implement recently achieved in-state CWD testing capabilities.

“The range in which the disease is found appears to be expanding, so finding it in more animals in that area is not surprising,” said Kerry Mower, the Department's lead wildlife disease biologist. “But it is disappointing to find our first cases of CWD in free-ranging elk.”

Brain stem samples from the two elk were among more than 100 taken from deer and elk in Unit 34 this year and sent to the Veterinary Diagnostic Services Laboratory in Albuquerque. The Albuquerque laboratory's “presumptive positive” samples from the two elk were confirmed as CWD-positive by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

“We will continue our efforts to monitor the disease by actively testing animals in Units 34 and 19,” Mower said. “We also encourage all hunters statewide to submit their animals for testing.” The Department personally informs hunters if the tests are positive. Hunters will be able to see the complete list of test results as they become available on the Department Web site, www.wildlife.state.nm.us .

This season, hunters who kill animals in a “Control Area” of Unit 34 are required to submit their animals for testing and observe special regulations affecting which body parts of a deer or elk can be removed from the unit. Hunting seasons continue in that area into January.

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological illness that afflicts deer, elk and moose. There is no evidence of CWD being transmitted to humans or livestock. The disease causes animals to become emaciated, display abnormal behavior and lose control of bodily functions. To date, it has been found in captive and wild deer, elk and moose in eight states and two Canadian provinces.

The origin of CWD in New Mexico is unknown. It has been found in 12 wild deer and two wild elk since 2002, when the disease was first discovered east of Las Cruces. All of the CWD-positive deer and elk in New Mexico were from the southern Sacramento Mountains southeast of Cloudcroft and areas surrounding the Organ Mountains near Las Cruces.

For more information about CWD in New Mexico, including special regulations and how hunters can assist in research and prevention, visit the Department Web site at www.wildlife.state.nm.us . More information about CWD also can be found on the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance site at www.cwd-info.org/ or on the Colorado Division of Wildlife site at http://wildlife.state.co.us/.

###

http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/publications/press_releases/documents/10-9cwdelk.htm

CWD CONTROL MAP NM

http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/documents/cwdcontrolmap.pdf


TSS
----- Original Message -----
From: "ProMED-mail"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2005 11:32 AM
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM)


> CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE, CERVIDS - USA (NEW MEXICO)
> ***************************************************
> A ProMED-mail post
>
> ProMED-mail is a program of the
> International Society for Infectious Diseases
>
>
> Date: 24 Jun 2005
> From: Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
> Source: New Mexico Wildlife News, Mon, 27 Jun 2005 [edited]
>
>
>
> 2 Mule Deer Test Positive For Chronic Wasting Disease
> ---------------------------------------------------
> 2 mule deer captured in the Organ Mountains as part of an ongoing
> research project near White Sands Missile Range have tested positive
> for chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal neurological disease that
> attacks the brains of infected deer and elk, the Department of Game
> and Fish announced.
>
> The number of confirmed CWD cases in New Mexico now stands at 11
> since 2002, when the disease was first confirmed in a deer found near
> the eastern foothills of the Organ Mountains. All 11 CWD-infected
> deer were found in the same general area of southern New Mexico. The
> origin of the disease in New Mexico remains unknown. The carcasses of
> the infected deer will be incinerated, said Kerry Mower, the
> Department's lead wildlife disease biologist.
>
> Mower said the most recent CWD-positive deer showed no obvious
> physical signs of having the disease. They were captured in April
> 2005 and tested as part of a 3-year-old research project studying
> deer population dynamics in southern New Mexico. More than 140 deer
> have been captured alive and tested for the study, in which
> researchers hope to find the cause of a 10-year decline in the area
> deer population. Study participants include the Department of Game
> and Fish, the U.S. Army at White Sands Missile Range and Fort Bliss,
> Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Geological Survey at New Mexico State
> University, and San Andres National Wildlife Refuge.
>
> Hunters can assist the Department in its CWD research and prevention
> efforts by bringing their fresh, legally harvested deer or elk head
> to an area office, where officers will remove the brain stem for
> testing. Participants will be eligible for drawings for an oryx hunt
> on White Sands Missile Range and a trophy elk hunt on the Valle
> Vidal. For more information about the drawing and chronic wasting
> disease, visit the Department web site at
>
>
> See map:
>
>
> --
> ProMED-mail
>
>
> [Members are strongly encouraged to view the NM CWD map at the URL
> below. In 2004 they tested 997 deer, each shown. These recent deer
> are clustered with the others just to the east of Las Cruces in
> southern New Mexico. The absence of cases elsewhere in the state at
> this level of surveillance increases one's confidence in the reality
> of this specific high-risk area. The origin of their infection is
> still obscure.
>
> The New Mexico CWD website is:
>
>
> Unfortunately, other than their admirable map, they have not been
> updated since 14 Jun 2004.
>
> The site being close to Texas and to Mexico has spawned speculation,
> but as yet without foundation. In the past 3 years Texas has tested
> some 9103 deer out of a target population estimate of 3 917 926, all
> negative. For details of the Texas Chronic Wasting Management Plan,
> go to:
>
> or the Texas Animal Health Commission CWD website:
>
> - Mod.MHJ]
>
> [see also:
> 2003
> ----
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM) (02) 20030217.0414
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (NM) 20030207.0328
> 2002
> ----
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (New Mexico) (02) 20020620.4548
> Chronic wasting disease, cervids - USA (New Mexico) 20020619.4535]
> ...............................................lm/mhj/pg/lm
>
>
> *##########################################################*
> ************************************************************
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> or archived material.
> ************************************************************
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