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From: TSS ()
Subject: 19 October 2005 - Letter sent to registered cattle keepers (OTM) Cattle and related issues
Date: October 19, 2005 at 7:31 am PST

Zone 311, 1A Page Street, London, SW1P 4PQ

Fax: 020 7904 6325

Email: stuart.roberts@defra.gsi.gov.uk

Telephone 020 7904 6314 GTN: 3290 6314

Website www.defra.gov.uk

Dear Abattoir Operator

1. Slaughter of Over Thirty Month (OTM) Cattle and related issues

As you will be aware, the UK Government has announced that the OTM rule is to be

replaced with a robust system of BSE testing of cattle born on or after 1 August 1996. The

information in this letter is important, whether or not you intend to slaughter OTM

cattle for human consumption. It does not cover the OTM approval process. If you are

interested in being approved to slaughter OTM cattle and have not already applied, please

contact the MHS OTM Approvals Team on 01904 456193 or email them at

otm.approvals@mhs.foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk.

2. Consignment of cattle born before 1 August 1996 to a red meat slaughterhouse

supplying the human food chain

These animals must be excluded from the human food chain. If any of these older cattle

are found at any red meat slaughterhouse (whether or not it is approved to slaughter OTM

cattle for human consumption) the animal will need to be killed in the lairage and notified

as fallen stock. In GB, fallen stock should be notified to the TSE Surveillance Helpline on

0800 525890 for BSE testing and disposal free of charge. However, no compensation will

be payable on the animal. Any such incidence should be immediately brought to the

attention of your OVS. Any person consigning such an animal(s) to a red meat

slaughterhouse will have committed an offence under UK law. All fresh meat abattoirs

should ensure that their procurement and lairage procedures, as well as their HACCP

plan, are updated to cover this eventuality.

3. Consignment of cattle born on or after 1 August 1996 to a red meat

slaughterhouse which is not approved to slaughter OTM cattle

Cattle born on or after 1 August 1996 destined for human consumption following BSE

testing, should be consigned to an abattoir which has been specifically approved to

slaughter these animals. However, if any are found at a non-approved fresh meat

slaughterhouse, they must be treated as fallen stock (as detailed above). No

compensation will be paid. All fresh meat abattoirs not handling OTM cattle, should

10 October 2005

ensure that their procurement and lairage procedures, as well as their HACCP plan, are

updated to cover this eventuality.

4. Cattle subject to emergency slaughter on farm

New rules on the emergency slaughter of animals will come into place from 1 January

2006. From that date, where cattle are slaughtered on farm, only those animals that have

suffered an accident will be eligible for human consumption (or considered fit for human

consumption as required for entry into the Over Thirty Month Scheme – OTMS, or the

Older Cattle Disposal Scheme - OCDS). Abattoirs slaughtering OTM cattle for the food

chain are being encouraged to apply these new rules immediately. Information on these

new rules has been circulated to all UK cattle keepers, veterinary practitioners and OVSs,

and a booklet is enclosed with this letter for your reference.

5. Coding of Brainstem Samples in Fresh Meat Abattoirs

Fresh meat abattoirs not approved to slaughter OTM animals, but which sample 24-30

month casualty cattle for human consumption, will need to use from 1 November, one of

two new codes in the paperwork accompanying the samples to the testing laboratory

(LGC). These are:

CC24 AM – for all 24-30 month casualty animals identified at ante mortem inspection

(These may have been submitted with a Schedule 18 certificate);

CC24 ES – for all casualty animals subject to Emergency Slaughter on farm

(Schedule 19 animals).

Fresh Meat abattoirs approved to slaughter OTM cattle for human consumption should use

the following codes:

HUM-H for all healthy OTM cattle slaughtered for human consumption;

HUM-CAM for all casualty animals identified at ante mortem (these may have been

submitted with a Schedule 18 certificate animals);

HUM-CES for all casualty animals subject to emergency slaughter on farm

(Schedule 19 animals).

Further information and details on the use of the above codes, and how to forward

samples to an approved testing laboratory, is available from the LGC Customer Care

Team on tel. 01928 511678 (email bse.services@lgc.co.uk). Please note that failure to use

one of the above codes, or the use of the incorrect code, will result in LGC having to report

an ‘outstanding’ result which will mean that the carcase and other parts of the body of the

affected animal(s) cannot be health marked and released for human consumption. This will

remain the case until LGC has received the missing or corrected information and are able

to report a result.

6. Requirement for blue stripe labelling of carcases from under 30 month cattle

containing vertebral column

The Food Standards Agency has written to you separately on these requirements (letter

dated 29 September).

If you have any queries on any of the above, please contact Sinjini Mukherjee, on 020

7904 6375 (e-mail sinjini.mukherjee@defra.gsi.gov.uk).

yours Sincerely

Stuart Roberts

BSE Division

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/pdf/industry101005.pdf

Area 311

1A Page Street

London

SW1P 4PQ

Telephone 0207 904 6000

Website www.defra.gov.uk

14 October 2005

To All Registered Cattle Keepers

Our ref CUL 196M

Dear Sir/Madam

REPLACEMENT OF THE OVER THIRTY MONTHS (OTM) RULE WITH BSE TESTING

FOR ALL CATTLE BORN AFTER 31 JULY 1996

As you may know, the OTM rule, which bans OTM cattle from the food chain, is expected

to be replaced with effect from 7 November 2005. From that date, OTM cattle may go into

the food chain but will be subject to new BSE testing arrangements. Cattle born or reared

in the UK before 1 August 1996 will remain excluded. These changes are subject to

Parliamentary approval of the necessary new legislation.

Abattoirs must be approved to handle OTM cattle. To be approved there must be a written

agreement between an abattoir and the Meat Hygiene Service (MHS) who will be

responsible for enforcing the necessary standards in abattoirs. Before sending OTM cattle

to an abattoir for slaughter you should check with that abattoir that it can handle OTM

animals. Animals sent to the wrong slaughterhouse will usually be killed and disposed of

without compensation.

Only OTM cattle that receive a negative test result for BSE under the new system will be

allowed into the food chain. Compensation will be payable on OTM cattle which test

positive for BSE and which are therefore excluded from the food chain.

1. New legal offence

Any cattle born or reared in the UK before 1 August 1996, which includes all cattle

(including imported cattle) kept in the UK before that date, remain excluded from the food

chain. To help ensure that none of these older cattle enter the human food chain, there

will be a new legal offence of sending cattle born or reared in the UK before August 1996

to abattoirs producing meat for human consumption.

For cattle born before 1 August 1996, Defra is discussing with the European Commission

a voluntary compensation scheme (the Older Cattle Disposal Scheme (OCDS)) which is

expected to run for three years. The OCDS will succeed the current Over Thirty Months

Scheme (OTMS) but is not expected to be in operation until January at the earliest. It

should be noted that the OTMS will remain in place until the OCDS is implemented. In this

interim period you will be able to send cattle born after July 1996: either:

• for human consumption at an abattoir approved to slaughter OTM cattle; or

• for disposal under the OTMS.

Cattle born before 1 August 1996 will continue to be excluded from the food chain and will

continue to be disposed of under the OTMS.

Please note that when the OTMS is replaced only cattle born before August 1996 will be

eligible for the OCDS. Further information on the OCDS will be sent to you once the

details of the new Scheme are finalised. In the interim if you have any queries on the

OTMS or OCDS please contact Livestock Strategy Division on 0207 238 3149 or email

emma.boyd@defra.gsi.gov.uk.

2. Cattle subject to emergency slaughter on farm

New rules on the emergency slaughter of animals will come into place from 1 January

2006. From that date, where cattle are slaughtered on farm, only those animals that have

suffered an accident will be eligible for human consumption (or considered fit for human

consumption as required by the OTMS or the OCDS). Where an OTM animal has been

slaughtered on farm, and is eligible for human consumption, it is your responsibility to

ensure that it is sent to an abattoir that can handle OTM animals. Abattoirs slaughtering

OTM cattle for the food chain are being encouraged to apply these new rules immediately.

A laminated leaflet explaining the new rules on emergency slaughter on farm is enclosed.

3. Residues of veterinary medicines and other substances

A guidance note on protecting the food chain from unacceptable veterinary residues is

also enclosed.

4. Beef Export ban

The UK is currently working with the European Commission on lifting export restrictions.

However, any change to the current restrictions is not expected to come into effect before

early 2006.

5. Fallen Stock: cattle that die on farm or are killed other than for human

consumption

A reminder:

• For cattle aged over 24 months, please complete details of death in the passport or

registration document and telephone 0800 525890 (GB) for free collection of the

carcase for BSE testing and disposal. The passport or document should stay with

the animal, to be collected at the same time

• For cattle aged 24 months or less, please complete details of death in the passport

or registration document and send it to BCMS. Please dispose of the carcase in

accordance with the Animal By-products Regulations.

6. Cattle Identification

Please make sure that your cattle are properly tagged and that you meet legal deadlines

and requirements for reporting births, movements and deaths and maintaining farm

records. Failure to do so may lead to potential prosecution under cattle identification

legislation and may also affect your single farm payment. Cattle that are sent for slaughter

which do not meet cattle identification requirements may be disposed of without

compensation. If you are in any doubt about these rules, please contact BCMS on 0845

050 1234

If you have any queries on the content of this letter, or have any other questions on OTM

cattle for human consumption, please call me on 0207 904 6314, or my colleague Andy

Cooke on 0207 904 6324. Alternatively, you can e-mail Andy at

andy.cooke@defra.gsi.gov.uk.

Yours faithfully

Stuart Roberts

Head of TSE Testing Branch

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/pdf/england141005.pdf

SCOTTISH EXECUTIVE

Environment and Rural Affairs Department

Food and Agriculture Group

To: All registered cattle keepers in Scotland

Pentland House

47 Robb’s Loan

Edinburgh EH14 1TY

Telephone: 0131-244 6412

Fax: 0131-244 4297

mailto:ScottishTSEregs@scotland.gsi.gov.uk

Dear Sir/Madam

REPLACEMENT OF THE OVER THIRTY MONTHS (OTM) RULE WITH BSE

TESTING FOR ALL CATTLE BORN AFTER 31 JULY 1996

As you may know, the OTM rule, which bans OTM cattle from the food chain,

is to be replaced with effect from 7 November 2005. From that date, OTM

cattle may go into the food chain but will be subject to new BSE testing

arrangements. Cattle born or reared in the UK before 1 August 1996 will

remain excluded.

Abattoirs must be approved to handle OTM cattle. To be approved there

must be a written agreement between the abattoir and the Meat Hygiene

Service (MHS). Before sending OTM cattle to an abattoir for slaughter you

should check with that abattoir that it can handle OTM animals. OTM animals

sent to non-approved slaughterhouse will usually be killed and disposed of

without compensation.

Only OTM cattle that receive a negative test result for BSE under the new

system will be allowed into the food chain.

1. New legal offence

Any cattle born or or reared in the UK before 1 August 1996, which includes

all cattle (including imported cattle) kept in the UK before that date, remain

excluded from the food chain. To help ensure that none of these older cattle

enter the human food chain, from 7th November, there will be a new legal

offence prohibiting cattle born or reared in the UK before August 1996 being

sent to abattoirs producing meat for human consumption.

For cattle born before 1 August 1996, we are discussing with the European

Commission a voluntary compensation scheme, (the Older Cattle Disposal

Scheme (OCDS)), which is expected to run for three years. The OCDS will

succeed the Over Thirty Months Scheme (OTMS) but is not expected to be in

operation until early January 2006 at the earliest. Until OCDS is launched,

the OTMS will remain in place. Therefore in the interim period, you will be

able to send cattle born after July 1996: either:

• for human consumption at an abattoir approved to slaughter OTM

cattle; or

• for disposal under the OTMS.

Cattle born before August 1996 remain eligible for disposal under the OTMS.

Please note that once the OTMS closes only cattle born before August 1996

will be eligible for the OCDS. Further information on the OCDS will be sent to

you once the details of the new Scheme are finalised. In the interim if you

have any queries on the OTMS or OCDS please contact John Burns on 0131

244 3105 or by e-mail at john.burns2@scotland.gsi.gov.uk.

2. Cattle subject to emergency slaughter on farm

New rules on the emergency slaughter of animals will come into place from 1

January 2006. From that date, where cattle are slaughtered on farm, only

those animals that have suffered an accident will be eligible for human

consumption (or considered fit for human consumption as required by the

OTMS or the OCDS). Where an OTM animal has been slaughtered on farm,

and is eligible for human consumption, it is your responsibility to ensure that it

is sent to an abattoir that can handle OTM animals. Abattoirs slaughtering

OTM cattle for the food chain are being encouraged to apply these new rules

immediately. Two leaflets are enclosed: a laminated leaflet explaining the

new rules on emergency slaughter on farm and a guidance note on protecting

the food chain from unacceptable veterinary residues.

3. Beef Export ban

The UK is currently working with the European Commission on lifting the

export restrictions. However, any change to the current restrictions is not

expected to come into effect before early 2006.

4. Cattle Identification

Please make sure that your cattle are properly tagged and that you meet the

legal deadlines and requirements for reporting births, movements, deaths and

maintaining farm records. Failure to do so may lead to potential prosecution

under cattle identification legislation and may also affect your single farm

payment. Cattle that are sent for slaughter which do not meet cattle

identification requirements may be disposed of without compensation. If you

are in any doubt about these rules, please contact BCMS on 0845 050 1234

If you have any queries on the content of this letter, or have any other

questions on OTM cattle for human consumption, please call my colleague

Andrew Taylor on 0131 244 6642. Alternatively, you can e-mail Andrew at

andrew.taylor@scotland.gsi.gov.uk.

Yours sincerely

Martin Morgan

Beef Exports, BSE & Animal Waste Branch

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/pdf/scot141005.pdf

TSS




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