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From: TSS ()
Subject: FLORIDA FIRM RECALLS POTENTIAL MAD COW POLISH SAUSAGE made with Chicken, Pork, Beef "08 2005" (GWs BSE MRR policy alive and well)
Date: August 29, 2005 at 7:03 pm PST

FSIS RECALL RELEASE

CLASS I RECALL Congressional and Public Affairs

HEALTH RISK: HIGH Steven Cohen (202) 720-9113

FSIS-RC-35-2005

FLORIDA FIRM RECALLS POLISH SAUSAGE

FOR POSSIBLE UNDERPROCESSING

WASHINGTON, Aug. 29, 2005 - Lykes Meat Group, a Plant City, Fla., firm, is voluntarily recalling approximately 35,830 pounds of Polish Sausage that may have been under processed, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced today.

The following products are subject to recall:

∑ 14 oz. packages of "JOHN MORRELL, Polish Sausage, made with Chicken, Pork, Beef."

The recalled products bear a package code of "162509A" or "162509B." A sell by date of "08 2005" appears on the outside of the package. The establishment number "EST. 8" also appears on the outside of the package.

The sausage was produced and packaged on June 11 and was distributed to retail stores in Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, New York and Ohio.

The problem was discovered by the company. FSIS has received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.

Consumers with questions about the recall should call the company toll free at (800) 414-0600. Media with questions about the recall should contact company representative David Bartlett at (703) 234-4428.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at (888) 674-6854. The hotline is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

"Ask Karen" is the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day to answer your questions at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Food_Safety_Education/Ask_Karen/index.asp#Question.

NOTE: Access news releases and other information at the FSIS Web site at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fsis_Recalls/

Opinion of the

Scientific Steering Committee

on the

GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF

BOVINE SPONGIFORM

ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR) in

POLAND

Adopted on 30/03/2001

Opinion of the Scientific Steering Committee on the

GEOGRAPHICAL RISK OF BOVINE SPONGIFORM

ENCEPHALOPATHY (GBR)

in Poland

THE QUESTION

The Scientific Steering Committee (SSC) was asked by the Commission to express

its scientific opinion on the Geographical BSE-Risk (GBR), i.e. the likelihood of

the presence of one or more cattle being infected with BSE, pre-clinically as well

as clinically, at a given point in time, in a number of Third Countries.

This opinion addresses the GBR of Poland.

THE BACKGROUND

In December 1997 the SSC expressed its first opinion on Specified Risk Materials

where it stated, inter alia, that the list of SRM could probably be modulated in the

light of the species, the age and the geographical origin of the animals in question.

In June 2000 the European Commission adopted a Decision on SRM

(2000/418/EC), prohibiting the import of SRM from all Third Countries that have

not been "satisfactorily" assessed with regard to their BSE-Risk.

In July 2000 the SSC adopted its final opinion on "the Geographical Risk of

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (GBR)". This opinion described a method and

a process for the assessment of the GBR and summarised the outcome of its

application to 23 countries. Detailed reports on the GBR-assessments were

published on the Internet for each of these countries.

In September 2000 the Commission invited 46 Third Countries, which are

authorised to export products to the EU that are listed in annex II to the above

mentioned SRM-Decision, to provide a dossier for the assessment of their GBR.

Until today 36 dossiers have been received, 6 are already assessed, and 30 are in

different state of assessment.

This opinion concerns only one country, Poland. The Commission requested this

opinion as essential input into its Decision concerning the treatment of SRM that

will be requested from Poland. It is recommended that this opinion on Poland is

read in the light of the GBR of the SSC of July 2000.

The SSC is concerned that the available information was not confirmed by

inspection missions as they are performed by the FVO in the Member States. It

recommends that BSE-related aspects are included in the program of future

inspection missions, as far as feasible.

THE ANALYSIS

Poland was exposed to a very low challenge between 1980-86, a very high

external challenge between 1987-90 and an extremely high external challenge

since 1991, mainly due to massive imports of MBM from BSE affected countries

(in the range of 1,700,000 tonnes in total, mainly from DE: around 1,000,000

tonnes in total). High imports of cattle are also recorded for the period since 1988.

The BSE/cattle system of Poland was and is very unstable since 1980.

Feeding MBM to cattle was legally possible until March 1997 and is likely to have

occurred, even if it was uncommon practice. The efficiency of the feed-ban cannot

be assessed, as feed controls were apparently not carried out. Rendering is and was

common practice in Poland. Material includes ruminant material, including SRM,

condemned material, and a limited proportion of fallen stock. The rendering

processes used were adequate for reducing BSE-infectivity since a long time.

There is no SRM ban. Cross contamination is most probable (no specified feed

lines, no controls described). BSE is notifiable since 1997 and surveillance was

nearly non existent until 1997. Since 1977, passive surveillance does not fulfil OIE

requirements. Active surveillance has started in 2001.

It is concluded that it is likely but not confirmed that one or several cattle that are

(pre-clinically or clinically) infected with the BSE agent are currently present in

the domestic herd of Poland (GBR III).

Given the very unstable system and the fact that the BSE-agent is likely to be

already present in the country, it is assumed that the GBR is increasing.

A summary of the reasons for the current assessment is given in annex 1 to this

opinion.

A detailed report on the assessment of the GBR of Poland is published separately

on the Internet. It was produced by the GBR-task force of the SSC-secretariat and

peer reviewed by the GBR-Peer group. The country had two opportunities to

comment on different drafts of the report before the SSC took both, the report and

the comments, into account for producing this opinion. The SSC appreciates the

good co-operation of the countryís authorities.

ANNEX 1

Poland - Summary of the GBR-Assessment, February 2001

EXTERNAL CHALLENGE STABILITY INTERACTION OF EXTERNAL

CHALLENGE AND STABILITY

80-86: very low; 87-90: very high; 91-

01: extremely high

1980-2001: Very unstable

GBRlevel

Live cattle

imports MBM imports Feeding Rendering SRM-removal Surveillance, crosscontamination

III

The very high to extremely high external

challenge met a very unstable system and

could have led to contamination of

domestic cattle in Poland from 1987

onwards.

This internal challenge again met the still

very unstable system and increased over

time.

The continuing very high external

challenge supported this development.

GBRtrend

INTERNAL CHALLENGE

increasing

UK : 0

Other BSE affected

countries:

Between 80-87:

737 animals

(mainly DE).

Since 1988 around

89,000 animals

and around 23,000

animals since

1994,

imports mainly from

DE, NL, FR and DK

UK:

176 tonnes (94-95)

Other BSE

affected countries:

86-90: around

41,000 t mainly

from FR and DK

Since 1991:

around 1.7 million

tonnes, mainly

from DE,DK, NL.

Around 1 million

tonnes from DE

since 1990.

Not OK

MBM-ban

since 1997,

but no feed

controls.

Reasonably OK

Heat treatment

equivalent to

133įC / 20min / 3

bar standards, but

no evidence

provided on

compliance.

Not OK.

No SRM-ban,

SRM are

rendered and

included in

cattle feed.

BSE surveillance:

Not sufficient before

2001.

Cross-contamination:

Lines for ruminant

and non-ruminant

feed in feed-mills only

separated in time and

no analytical controls

carried out.

Likely present since 1987 and growing.

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

B. OIE LIST B DISEASES

International

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

BSE in Poland, May 2002 -- A nine year old cow tested positive for BSE in the village of Mochnaczka near Polandís southern border with Slovakia. Poland began routine testing for BSE in October 2001. Over 100,000 cattle have been tested under this program and this is the first case detected in Poland. Three other cows which had been kept together with the positive cow were tested and found negative.

Source: CEI Impact Worksheet, OIE, Agworldwide, AGAM

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/DiseaseSummary_files/disease_summary0602.htm

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Poland

Impact Worksheet, May 7, 2002


[ Impact Worksheets | CEI Home ]

Summary:

The first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Poland was confirmed on May 2, 2002. The affected nine-year old cow tested BSE positive at a slaughterhouse located in the village of Mochnaczka Wyzna, province of Little Poland (Malopolskie) near Polandís southern border with Slovakia. Poland began routine testing for BSE of all slaughtered cattle over 24 months of age in October 2001. In January 2002, testing was changed to all slaughtered cattle over the age of 30 months.

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe including Poland. In December 2000, import restrictions regarding BSE were expanded to prohibit all imports of rendered animal protein products, regardless of species, from Europe. Between 1998 and 2001, the US imported non-species specific animal products used in animal feeds and non-species specific sausage and offal products. Given US restrictions on ruminant product imports, these US imports should not have contained ruminant material.

Polandís stocks of cattle and sheep were less than 1 percent of world stocks in 2001. Poland is the worldís 5th largest exporter of live cattle exporting nearly 600,000 animals in 2000. Cattle exports go primarily to European countries although Israel imported significant numbers of Polish cattle in 2000 and 2001.

______________________________________________________________________________

How extensive is the outbreak of BSE in Poland?

The first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Poland was confirmed on May 2, 2002. The affected nine-year old cow tested BSE positive at a slaughterhouse located in the village of Mochnaczka Wyzna, province of Little Poland (Malopolskie), near Polandís southern border with Slovakia. Poland began routine BSE testing of all slaughtered cattle over the age of 24 months in October 2001. In January 2002, testing was changed to all slaughtered cattle over the age of 30 months. The affected cow was the first positive test result in over 100,000 cattle tested. Police and veterinary services are investigating the source of the disease.

Sources: OIE; Promed (ABC news); USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service GAIN Reports #PL1037 (October 11, 2001) and #PL2004 (February 1, 2002)

What actions has Poland taken to protect its livestock from BSE?

The Polish Veterinary Service banned imports of cattle from BSE countries in December 2000. A ban on imports of meat and bone meal was enacted in January 2001.

Source: USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service GAIN Report #PL1037, October 11, 2001

What is Polandís production and trade in affected animals and animal products?

Poland's stocks of cattle and sheep were less than 1 percent of world stocks in 2001 (Table 1). Cattle imports totaled nearly 7,000 animals in 2000 while sheep imports were less than 200 head. Cattle imports were from European countries. Poland is the 5th largest exporter of live cattle in the world, exporting nearly 600,000 animals in 2000 (6 percent of world trade). Polish farmers produce young fattening cattle for export as a side enterprise of their dairy herds. Cattle exports were sent primarily to Italy (over 50 percent of the total), the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Greece, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Slovenia. Israel received over 50,000 cattle from Poland in 2000. In addition to cattle, Poland exported over 200,000 sheep in 2000. The destination of these sheep exports was not available.

Table 1. Polandís live animal stocks and exports and imports of live animals.

Live Animal
2001 Stocks
Trade

2000 Exports
2000 Imports

Head
% World
Head
% World
Head
% World

Cattle 5,723,000 <1% 593,046 6.2% 6,874 <1%
Sheep1 337,000 <1% 212,214 1.3% 161 <1%


Polandís production of beef/veal and mutton/lamb in 2001 was small on a worldwide scale representing less than 1 percent of total world production (Table 2). Beef production within Poland has been decreasing since 1998. Polish consumers have been reducing their beef consumption due to BSE fears and switching to poultry. Polandís imports and exports of beef/veal and mutton/lamb were also small representing less than 1 percent of world imports and exports.

Table 2. Production and trade in relevant products by Poland.

Products
2001 Production
Trade

2000 Exports
2000 Imports

Metric Ton
% World
Metric Ton
% World
Metric Ton
% World

Beef and Veal 300,000 <1% 9,375 <1% 162 <1%
Mutton and Lamb1 1,300 <1% 96 <1% 24 <1%


1 Sheep were included in Table 1 and Table 2 as Ďaffectedí because USDA/APHIS includes all ruminants and ruminant products in its restrictions pertaining to BSE. Goat production and trade information was unavailable.

Source: United Nations FAO; USDA, Foreign Agricultural Service GAIN Reports #PL1022 (July 30, 2001) and #PL2004 (February 1, 2002)

What are the U.S. imports of affected animals or animal products from Poland?

The US imported no live ruminant animals or ruminant meat from Poland during 1998 to 2001. During the past four years (1998 - 2001), US imports from Poland included non-species specific animal products used in animal feeds and non-species specific sausage and offal products (Table 3). Given US restrictions on ruminant product imports, these US imports should not have contained ruminant material.

Mexico imported non-species specific preparations used in animal feed (HS code 23099099) from Poland during 1998 to 2001. Canada did not import any items of risk from Poland during 1998 to 2001.

Table 3. Relevant US imports from Poland in 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001

HS Code
Description
Unit
1998
1999
2000
2001

Feed - non species specific
Total
6,684
0
0
0

0511993000
Products Used as Food, For Animals
KG
6,684
0
0
0

Meat & offal- non species specific
Total
92,945
27,274
44,102
78,332

0504000040
Gut/Bladder/Stomach of Animals For Sausage Casing, Not Hog or Fish
KG
0
0
420
280

1601006060
Sausage/Similar Prdct Meat Etc NESOI Food Prep Cnd
KG
81,413
25,872
0
0

1602204000
Animal Livers Except Goose, Prepared or Preserved
KG
11,532
1,402
43,682
78,052


Source: World Trade Atlas


Did the US have restrictions on ruminant imports from Poland prior to this case?

In December 1997, APHIS prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe including Poland until a thorough assessment of the risks of introduction of BSE into the US could be made. Prior to December 1997, import restrictions were applied only to those countries which had reported cases of BSE in native animals. Also, importation of ruminant meat from BSE-affected countries was permitted if the meat was deboned and free of visually identifiable lymphatic and nervous tissue and if it met other restrictions. Import regulations enacted December 1997 extended the import restrictions to countries which had not had a declared BSE case, yet had risk factors for BSE occurrence.

These regulatory changes also removed provisions that allowed importation of ruminant meat from the restricted countries, and thereby prohibited importation of ruminant meat from all Europe. These import restrictions also applied to bone meal, blood meal, meat meal, offal, fat, glands, and serum from ruminants. In December 2000, APHIS expanded its import restrictions regarding BSE to prohibit all imports from Europe of rendered animal protein products, regardless of species.

Source: USDA, APHIS, VS

What is the level of passenger traffic arriving in the United States from Poland?

A total of 188,946 passengers arrived at US airports on direct flights from Poland in fiscal year 2000. An undetermined number of passengers arrived in the US from Poland via indirect flights.

Under APHIS-PPQís agricultural quarantine inspection monitoring, 451 air passengers from Poland were sampled for items of agricultural interest in fiscal year 2000. Thirteen (13) of these passengers, or 2.9 percent, carried a total of 26.2 kg of meat items that could potentially harbor the pathogen(s) that cause BSE. None of these passengers from whom meat items were confiscated reported plans to visit or work on a ranch or farm during their visit to the US.

Source: US Department of Transportation, and APHIS-PPQ Agricultural Quarantine Inspection data base

CEIís plans for follow up:

CEI has no plans to provide additional information on this situation.

If you need more information or wish to comment, you may contact Judy Akkina at (970) 490-7852 or Carol Tuszynski at (970) 490-7893.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ceah/cei/IW_2002_files/bse_poland0502.htm

What measures has USDA-APHIS taken to prevent the introduction of BSE?
To prevent BSE from entering the United States, APHIS has restricted the importation of live ruminants and certain ruminant products from countries where BSE is known to exist.

In 1989, APHIS banned the importation of all ruminants and restricted the importation of certain cattle products from the United Kingdom and other countries where BSE was diagnosed.

On December 6, 1991, APHIS restricted the importation of ruminant meat and edible products and banned most byproducts of ruminant origin from countries known to have BSE (56 Federal Register [FR] 63868 and 63869). Prior to this, the products were prohibited by not issuing permits.

Certain products cannot be imported into the United States, except under special permit for scientific, educational or research purposes, or under special conditions to be used in cosmetics. These products include serum, glands, collagen, etc.

As of December 12, 1997, APHIS has prohibited the importation of live ruminants and most ruminant products from all of Europe. The restrictions applied to Albania, Austria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the former Yugoslavian republic of Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden. These actions were in addition to those already in place regarding countries that had reported BSE in native cattle.

This action was taken in 1997 because the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg have reported their first cases of BSE in native-born cattle. There is evidence that European countries may have had high BSE risk factors for several years and less-than-adequate surveillance.

An interim rule was published and the comment period closed on March 9, 1998. Criteria to assess the risk factors were developed in accordance with the standards adopted by the Office of International Epizootics (OIE).

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse-overview.html

Docket: 02N-0276 - Bioterrorism Preparedness; Registration of Food Facilities, Section 305
Comment Number: EC -254
Accepted - Volume 11

Comment Record
Commentor Mr. Terry Singeltary Date/Time 2003-04-08 10:36:55


snip...

Subject: Re: POLAND FINDS 4TH MAD COW CASE/USA IMPORTS FROM POLAND/non-species coding system strikes again

References: 3DC198E3.8090704@wt.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1;

format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit X-Virus-Scanner: Found to be clean

Greetings again List Members, let me kick a madcow around here a bit. on the imports from Poland and the infamous USA 'non-species' coding system. the USDA/APHIS states;

> During the past four years (1998 - 2001), US imports from

> Poland included non-species specific animal products

> used in animal feeds and non-species specific sausage and offal

> products (Table 3). Given US restrictions on ruminant product

> imports, these US imports should not have contained ruminant

> material.

NOW, if you read Polands GBR risk assessment and opinion on BSE, especially _cross-contamination_, it states;

ANNEX 1 Poland - Summary of the GBR-Assessment, February 2001 EXTERNAL CHALLENGE STABILITY INTERACTION OF EXTERNAL CHALLENGE AND STABILITY The very high to extremely high external challenge met a very unstable system and could have led to contamination of domestic cattle in Poland from 1987 onwards. This internal challenge again met the still very unstable system and increased over time. The continuing very high external challenge supported this development. Not OK MBM-ban since 1997, but no feed controls. Reasonably OK Heat treatment equivalent to 133įC / 20min / 3 bar standards, but no evidence provided on compliance. Not OK. No SRM-ban, SRM are rendered and included in cattle feed. BSE surveillance: Not sufficient before 2001. Cross-contamination: Lines for ruminant and non-ruminant feed in feed-mills only separated in time and no analytical controls carried out. Likely present since 1987 and growing.

see full text and ANNEX 1 at;

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf

so in my humble opinion, the statement by the USDA/APHIS that ''these US imports _should_ not have contained ruminant materials, is a joke. a sad joke indeed.

* POLAND BSE GBR RISK ASSESSMENT

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/ssc/out185_en.pdf http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/9911936.html

BSE ISRAEL change in disease status, AND THE DAMN NON-SPECIES CODING SYSTEM $$$ http://www.vegsource.com/talk/madcow/messages/9911943.html

Terry S. Singeltary Sr. P.O. Box 42 Bacliff, Texas USA 77518

CJD WATCH

http://www.fortunecity.com/healthclub/cpr/349/part1cjd.htm

CJD Watch/NEWS

http://disc.server.com/Indices/167318.html

TSS

snip...

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/02n0276/02N-0276-EC-254.htm

TOTAL BSE CASES TO DATE POLAND 22 CASES WITH 2 CASES IN 2005;

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/bse/statistics/bse/worldwide.htm

Greetings,

> Polish Sausage that may have been under processed

HOW do you process polish sausage from prions i.e. TSEs?

GWs BSE MRR (MINIMAL RISK REGION) i.e. legal trading of all strains of TSEs aka mad cow diseases globally is alive and well.

gotta love those mad cow triple firewalls and sealed borders...

TSS




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