Health

 

Feel Bad if Somone "Unlikes" You on Facebook? Watch this Video!

01/27/14

  • digg
  • Delicious
  • Furl
  • reddit
  • Technorati
  • stumbleupon

Get VegSource Alerts Get VegSource Alerts

First Name

Email

Email This Story to a Friend




Bestselling author and leading psychologist Guy Winch PhD gave a fascinating presentation at this year's Healthy Lifestyle Expo.

The title was" "How to Prevent Common Psychologic 'Injuries' -- Such as Rejection, Brooding, or Loneliness -- from Impacting Your Health"

In this segment he talks about rejection. Everyone feels it at some point or another.

Maybe you post a photo on Facebook and no one likes it? And you feel rejected?

Yes, there's plenty of rejection in social media.

Did you know that we experience the pain of rejection in the same area of our brain as we do when we experience physical pain? 

In fact, rejection is the only emotion which affects that area of the brain.

Why? 

Watch top psychologist Guy Winch PhD from our Expo in this short excerpt talking about a fascinating subject."

Video (10 minutes):

 

To get Dr. Winch's full talk, as well as a dozen other life-saving presentations, order the 2013 GET HEALTHY NOW WHITE DVD series, at this link: 

http://bit.ly/19W6TVs

2013DVD_Expo_300.jpg



FACEBOOK COMMENTS:


1 Comment | Leave a comment

user-pic

This is fascinating and its origins make sense. But now, how does this relate to those of us who decades ago went Vegan. At a time when Vegan was tantamount to a dirty word, we were in essence rejecting ourselves out of the mainstream for a cause, a higher calling. How many of us were ostracized and rejected outright for making this change? I surmise many of us who didn't have positive support around us.

Thankfully, this is no longer the case. As for Social Media, I've never gone onto Facebook and never will. The entire "like" thing is ridiculous. Besides, anti-social human animals are in huge supply and love to put down and ridicule others to make themselves feel good.

Does this mean that they themselves were rejected and therefore deeply hurt as children and have carried this with them? Does this apply to murderers and killers and those who live a criminal lifestyle? I'm reminded of the work "Clockwork Orange" and the tests and eventual implications thereof in that story.

Either way, this speaker is very good and the information very interesting. From my own personal experiences I can certainly testify that emotional pain is as intense as physical pain. Whereas many physical injuries heal, deep emotional pain leaves permanent scarring.

Leave a comment